Optics and Electronics Seminar

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series

Topic: 
When quantum-information scrambling met quasiprobabilities
Abstract / Description: 

 


Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series

Topic: 
New opportunities with old photonic materials
Abstract / Description: 

 


 

Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 22, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series presents Dynamic photonic structures

Topic: 
Dynamic photonic structures: non-reciprocity, gauge potential, and synthetic dimensions.
Abstract / Description: 

 

We show that dynamic photonic structures, where refractive index of the structure is modulated as a function of time, offers a wide ranges of possibilities for exploration of physics and applications of light. In particular, dynamic photonic structures naturally break reciprocity. With proper design such photonic structure can then be used to achieve complete optical isolation and to completely reproduce magneto-optical effects without the use of gyrotropic materials. Moreover, the phase of the modulation corresponds to an effective magnetic gauge potential for photons, through which one can explore a wide variety of fundamental physics effects of synthetic magnetic field using photons. Finally, such dynamic photonic structure can be used to explore physics, especially topological physics, in dimensions that are higher than the physical dimension of the structure, leading to intriguing possibilities in manipulation of the frequencies of light in non-trivial ways.


 

Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 15, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE Seminar: New Forms of Microscopy Enabled by Nanostructured Surfaces

Topic: 
New Forms of Microscopy Enabled by Nanostructured Surfaces
Abstract / Description: 

Since the advent of optical microscopy, a flat glass microscope slide has been the standard surface upon which tissues, cells, and biomolecules are attached for observation. Recently, we have utilized the optically resonant properties of nanostructured photonic crystal (PC) surfaces to enable several new microscopy modalities where the nanostructure provides new forms of contrast for a wide variety of compelling applications. By designing PC surfaces with resonances that match the excitation and emission spectra of photon emitters such as fluorophores and quantum dots, PC enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy reduces the detection limits of any surface-based fluorescence assay. By generating spatial images of the PC resonant reflection intensity, we can selectively and dynamically visualize the cell-extracellular matrix interface during processes that include stem cell differentiation, cancer cell response to drugs, and chemotaxis – including the ability to observe the formation and evolution of cell membrane focal adhesion sites. We call this approach Photonic Resonator Outcoupler Microscopy (PROM), as we observe highly localized outcoupling of light from the PC that occurs due to scattering by dense regions in the cell membrane. By utilizing metallic nanoparticle tags with plasmon resonances that match the PC resonance, we obtain highly efficient coupling of light into nanometer-scale electromagnetic hotspots, that is accompanied by highly localized "quenching" of the PC reflection efficiency, which we are using for digital-resolution detection of miRNA biomarkers for cancer with 100 aM limits of detection, using an approach called Photonic Resonator Absorption Microscopy (PRAM). The seminar will describe the physical principles, nanostructure design/fabrication, instrumentation, and applications for nanostructure-enabled microscopy for disease diagnostics, personalized medicine, and life science research.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE Seminar: Tunable and nonlinear metasurfaces: fundamentals and applications

Topic: 
Tunable and nonlinear metasurfaces: fundamentals and applications
Abstract / Description: 

Metasurfaces are artificial quasi-planar structures that can tailor light fields on demand. Their optical properties, however, are fixed upon fabrication, and a challenge is to find how to tune them externally. In the first part of the talk, I will review different approaches to tune optical properties of metasurfaces, including thermo-optic, electro-optic and all-optical ones, with applications in high-speed polarimetric devices and controllable ultrathin lens. In the second part, we will explore resonant semiconductor nanoparticles and metasurfaces as nonlinear frequency converters that have a potential to serve as ultrafast, nanoscale all-optical logic elements.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE Seminar: Glassification of the telecom/datacom world

Topic: 
Glassification of the telecom/datacom world
Abstract / Description: 

Emerging trends in applications of communication and data management are driving exciting challenges in the telecom/datacom industry. From 5G driving optical-wireless convergence all the way to hyperscale datacenters bringing the optical signal closer to the switch ASIC, breakthroughs in the technology enabling optical connectivity are becoming critical for the future. In this discussion, we will provide a quick overview of recent evolution and some emerging challenges in advanced optical connectivity, as well as insight on how Corning is embracing the opportunity to solve those challenges with glass.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, August 8, 2018 - 12:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 108

OSA/SPIE Seminar: Computational Optics for Multidimensional Nanoscale Imaging of Single Fluorescent Molecules

Topic: 
Computational Optics for Multidimensional Nanoscale Imaging of Single Fluorescent Molecules
Abstract / Description: 

Visualizing the dynamic movements and interactions between biomolecules remains a challenge, motivating the development of new optical technology and computational algorithms for imaging at the nanoscale. We have built two technologies for multidimensional imaging of single molecules (SMs): the Tri-spot point spread function (PSF) and the Robust Statistical Estimation (RoSE) algorithm. The Tri-spot PSF measures each second moment of SM orientation with near-uniform sensitivity, thereby capturing the orientation and rotational diffusion of SMs using just one camera frame. For 3D imaging, we developed RoSE to minimize the vectorial localization errors in super-resolution microscopy that result from both the structure of the sample and the PSF itself. By estimating the likelihood of a blinking event to be present in each imaging frame, RoSE localizes molecules accurately and minimizes false localizations even when images overlap.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 7, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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