Optics and Electronics Seminar

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "How the Intersection of Photonic Integrated Circuits, DSP, and Coherent Optics is Transforming Fiber Optic Networks"

Topic: 
How the Intersection of Photonic Integrated Circuits, DSP, and Coherent Optics is Transforming Fiber Optic Networks
Abstract / Description: 

Almost every decade there is a technological transformation of the communications network that results in a major step in scale and economic efficiency. Historically these disruptive forces include the EDFA, DWDM, Photonic Integration, First Generation of coherent technology in the optical realm and packet processing in the digital realm. It is my belief that we are on the cusp of a new revolution in optical networks fueled by the intersection of PICs, DSPs and Coherent optics. I will discuss the advancements to date and the revolution that is building.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 12, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Stanford Optical Society presents "The Connected World – A Vision"

Topic: 
The Connected World – A Vision
Abstract / Description: 

We are living a highly creative era in which digital consumer electronics will drive much of high-technology research and products for the betterment of people, society, and the environment. In particular the integration of photonics and electronics, with the utilization of micromechanics and bio devices, will allow us to develop sophisticated systems not achievable before to improve lives, clean our environment, speed and spread diagnostic technologies, and leapfrog traditional hurdles. It is important for the R&D community to create programs to innovate and solve problems that matter.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Workshop on Inverse Design and Automatic Differentiation for Optical Devices

Topic: 
Workshop on Inverse Design and Automatic Differentiation for Optical Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Do you want to learn how to use algorithms to automatically design and optimize optical devices? This approach is called "inverse design," and has become a very active area of research in recent years. Interestingly, the way that inverse design algorithms are able to efficiently compute gradients (through the adjoint variable method) is mathematically equivalent to the backpropagation algorithm used the machine learning community for training neural networks. Both approaches are instances of automatic differentiation! In this interactive workshop, we will explore these connections from a practical point of view by showing you how to optimize your very own nanophotonic devices by leveraging machine learning libraries. First, we will provide a brief crash course in optical device simulation. We will then spend most of the time discussing concepts in optimization and inverse design by walking through examples in a notebook format. All code will be made available publicly in advance of the workshop so attendees may follow along as we progress. The goal of this workshop will be to provide attendees with a broad understanding of the concepts involved in inverse design and automatic differentiation, while getting a hands-on feel for code and libraries that they can immediately adapt to their own research projects.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 21, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker

OSA/SPIE present "Engineering Sustainable Innovation Ecosystems"

Topic: 
Engineering Sustainable Innovation Ecosystems
Abstract / Description: 

Dr. Baer will discuss different approaches to creating sustainable financial ecosystems to support innovation in startups, SMEs, and academic environments. 


PLEASE RSVP

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 4, 2019 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 101

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics"

Topic: 
Hyperscale Data Center Applications of Optoelectronics
Abstract / Description: 

From subsea fiber cables to short-reach switch interconnects, opto-electronics is a key technology for hyperscale data center networks. As performance requirements increase, photonics moves deeper into the network replacing copper for shorter distances. The next move for photonics is to distances of less than 3m for in-rack applications. This talk will describe how the scale of data-bandwidth growth has challenged what is possible with traditional networks and where the next opportunities for innovation lie.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases"

Topic: 
Non-Equilibrium Dynamics and Townes Solitons Formation in Two-Dimensional Bose Gases
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 2, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Accelerated Scaling to Rapid Open-Air Fabrication of Durable Perovskite Solar Modules"

Topic: 
Accelerated Scaling to Rapid Open-Air Fabrication of Durable Perovskite Solar Modules
Abstract / Description: 

Organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites have seen a resurgence in interest due to unprecedented gains in power conversion efficiency (PCE). Perovskite solar cells, however, suffer from several stability challenges including thermomechanical reliability and moisture sensitivity, which are not competitive with the stability of c-Si modules that exhibit 25-service lifetimes.

We first review results from extensive studies involving an international collaboration on the inherent thermomechanical challenges for reliability of a wide range of planar and mesoporous perovskite solar cells including the role of perovskite and charge transport layer compositions. Trade-offs between efficiency and reliability, meaning maximal conversion efficiencies often come at the expense of mechanical reliability and long-term stability, are discussed.

We next consider accelerated scaling strategies to rapid open-air fabrication of durable perovskite solar modules with improved inherent perovskite and charge transport layer performance and thermal stability. We consider strategies to improve charge transport layers with a concomitant increase in device efficiency. Importantly, we demonstrate that mechanically robust perovskite films can be cured with an open-air atmospheric plasma discharge on large-scale substrates, and at linear deposition rates exceeding 4 cm/s with improved power conversion efficiency and open-circuit voltages.

Finally, we conclude by reporting on a new concept in solar cell design, the scaffold-reinforced compound solar cell (CSC) with integrated low cost optics which addresses the intrinsic fragility of these materials with mechanically reinforcing internal scaffolds. These developments mitigate the foremost barriers to wide-scale commercial deployment, namely perovskite module manufacturing and reliability, providing momentum towards the goal of 0.02 $/kWhr that exceeds even the most aggressive predictions for new silicon PV production and a pathway to tandems.


 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 11, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "A glimpse into the dark world of excitons in 2D semiconductors Via time--resolved µ-ARPES"

Topic: 
A glimpse into the dark world of excitons in 2D semiconductors Via time--resolved µ-ARPES
Abstract / Description: 

About a decade ago, the discovery of monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides opened a new frontier in the study of optically excited states in semiconductors, and related opto-electronic technologies. These materials exhibit a plethora of robust excitonic states, such as bright excitons at the K & K' valleys, momentum- and spin-forbidden dark excitons, and hot excitons. Optics-based experiments have revealed much about the bright excitonic states, but they remain largely unable to access their valley character, their scattering channels into other valleys within the Brilloin Zone, and the nature of the dark states in these valleys. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) based techniques would be ideal to access the valley character, and momentum-resolved scattering channels of photoexcited states in 2D semiconductors. But these are very challenging experiments to perform on the typically-available, micron-scale, 2D semiconductors. In today's talk, I will discuss the challenges involved, and progress made in my lab to date towards this aim. Any maybe – if time permits – we will end with an entertaining peek into the 'quantum psychology of dark excitons'!


 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 28, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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