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Optics and Electronics Seminar

AP 483 Seminar presents "Organic small molecule integrated photonics"

Topic: 
Organic small molecule integrated photonics
Abstract / Description: 

The initial, landmark integrated photonic devices relied on silicon and III-V materials, and recent advances in material fabrication and deposition methods have enabled a plethora of new technologies based on materials with higher optical nonlinearities, including 2D materials and organic polymers. However, nonlinear optical (NLO) organic small molecules have not experienced similar growth due to a perceived environmental instability and to challenges related to intra and intermolecular interactions. Because NLO small molecules have NLO coefficients that are orders of magnitude larger than conventional optical materials, developing strategies to fabricate optical devices could enable significant performance improvements. In recent work, we combined conventional top-down fabrication methods with bottom-up techniques to develop on-chip devices that incorporated NLO optical small molecules. These hybrid systems provide access to optical behavior and performance not attainable with conventional material systems. In this seminar, I will discuss a couple examples of NLO small molecule integrated resonators, including Raman lasers and all optically-switchable devices.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 4:15pm

AP 483 seminar presents "Sensing beyond the conventional limits: vortices, viscosity and molecular vibrations"

Topic: 
Sensing beyond the conventional limits: vortices, viscosity and molecular vibrations
Abstract / Description: 

It has been known for over a century that, in quantum physics, even the act of looking can have dramatic consequences. For instance, it kills the cat in Schrödinger’s famous thought experiment. However, it has proved extremely difficult to reach regimes where such effects play a role, let alone to use them as a tool to enhance measurement technologies. 

 

Over the past decade, however, advances in photonics and nanotechnology have allowed us to engineer both devices and states of light which exhibit this distinctive quantum behavior [1]. These “quantum optomechanical devices” consist of a nanoscale mechanical object – for example, a nanoparticle, molecule or cantilever – coupled to light via radiation pressure, often concentrated in a tiny optical cavity. In essence, they are miniature versions of the kilometer-scale interferometers that have enabled the extraordinary detection of gravitational waves from distant black hole collisions. Quite remarkably, they can allow measurements of motion at the sub-attometre level – more than a thousand times below the width of an atomic nucleus. At a fundamental level, this allows us to ask new questions of quantum physics for macroscopic systems consisting of trillions of atoms. It also provides a way to build precision optical sensors that far outperform the current state-of-the-art. 

 

In this talk, I will provide an overview of optomechanical sensors developed in my laboratory, with a particular focus on applications in the bioscience and in studying superfluid helium, a strongly interacting quantum liquid. This includes the observation of coherent vortex dynamics in two-dimensional superfluid helium [2]; the engineering of extreme Brillouin nonlinearities in superfluid thin-films [3]; a quantum-light microscope that provides absolute quantum advantage, allowing the observation of molecular vibrations of nanoscale biological structures that would otherwise be unresolvable [4]; and optical tweezers that allow tracking of the instantaneous

velocity of trapped particles, and through this orders-of-magnitude faster measurements of cell properties reaching microsecond timescales [5].

 
  1. Bowen and Milburn, Quantum Optomechanics, CRC Press (2016).
  2. Science 366 1480 (2019).
  3. Nature Physics 16 417 (2020); also Nature Physics 12 788 (2016).
  4. arXiv:2004.00178 (2020).
  5. arXiv:2007.03066 (2020); also Nature Photonics 11, 477-481 (2017); 9, 669-673 (2015); 7, 229-233 (2013)

This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Organized by Prof. Amir Safavi-Naeini

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 21, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom

AP 483 seminar presents "Quantum computing over the rainbow: the quantum optical frequency comb as a platform for measurement-based universal quantum computing"

Topic: 
Quantum computing over the rainbow: the quantum optical frequency comb as a platform for measurement-based universal quantum computing
Abstract / Description: 

An ultrafast laser emits vastly multimode light over a broad spectral band, a.k.a. the optical frequency comb (OFC), but the emission happens but one photon at a time, if in a stimulated manner, and no entanglement is created in the light. Changing the gain medium from linear (one-photon) to nonlinear (two-photon) yields an optical parametric oscillator which features massively multipartite entanglement of the OFC modes, as demonstrated experimentally by our group and others. This entanglement can then be exquisitely tailored to cluster states with specific graphs, in particular the two-dimensional ones that are universal for measurement-based, one-way quantum computing. It is worth noting that this requires only sparse experimental resources that are highly compatible with integrated optics, thereby paving the way to the realization of practical, fault-tolerant quantum computers.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Organized by Prof. Amir Safavi-Naeini

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom

OSA Color Technical Group presents "Modeling the Initial Steps of Human Vision"

Topic: 
Modeling the Initial Steps of Human Vision
Abstract / Description: 

Vision guides thought and action. To do so usefully it must inform us about critical features of the world around us. What we can learn about the world is limited by the initial stages of visual processing. Physicists, biologists and psychologists have created quantitative models of these stages, and these models enable us to quantify the encoded information. We have integrated these models as image computable software: the Image Systems Engineering Toolbox for Biology (ISETBio). The software is an extensible set of open-source modules that model the three-dimensional scene spectral radiance, retinal image formation (physiological optics), spatial sampling by the cone photoreceptor mosaic, fixational eye movements, and phototransduction. This webinar, hosted by the OSA Color Technical Group, will provide an overview of the ISETBio modules as well as examples of how to use the software to understand and model human visual performance.

Hosted By: Color Technical Group

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 - 9:00am

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Workshop on Inverse Design using SPINS"

Topic: 
Workshop on Inverse Design using SPINS
Abstract / Description: 

The goal of this workshop is to provide attendees with a practitioner's perspective of the basic ingredients and tools of inverse design using SPINS [1], a photonic optimization framework developed at Jelena Vuckovic's Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab over the past decade.
SPINS is a flexible inverse-design platform that is compatible with a variety of device parametrizations, electromagnetic solvers, and objective functions. This has enabled SPINS to be used to design and experimentally demonstrate functional devices in a wide variety of different application areas including grating couplers [2-4], optical routing for LiDAR [5], and electron accelerators [6].
In this workshop, we will work through examples of using SPINS to design simple devices, including grating couplers and silicon photonics devices. We will emphasize how attendees can adapt these examples for their own applications and discuss some practical considerations for using inverse-design to produce functional devices. All example code will be available online after the workshop.

[1] Su, L. et al. Nanophotonic inverse design with SPINS: software architecture and practical considerations. Appl. Phys. Rev. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5131263 (2020).
[2] Su, L. et al. Fully-automated optimization of grating couplers. Optics Express, 26(4): 4023–4034, 2018.
[3] Sapra, N. V. et al. Inverse design and demonstration of broadband grating couplers. IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 25, 1–7 (2019).
[4] Dory, etl al. Inverse-designed diamond photonics. Nature Communications, 10(1):3309, 2019.
[5] Yang, K. Skarda, J. et al., Inverse-designed non-reciprocal pulse router for chip-based LiDAR, Nature Photonics DOI: 10.1038/s41566-020-0606-0 (2020)
[6] Sapra, N. V. et al., On-chip integrated laser-driven particle accelerator. Science 367, 79-83 (2020).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 945 5728 7546 (password required)

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Next Generation Photonics"

Topic: 
Next Generation Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past few decades, silicon photonics has revolutionized photonic integrated circuits by leveraging the semiconductor CMOS manufacturing infrastructure for low cost, high performance devices and systems. However, key fundamental challenges of the field remain unsolved: packaging the devices with optical fibers and generating light on chip.

We developed a novel approach for fiber packaging based on fusing the fiber and chip together. Connecting a silicon photonic chip across long distances requires attaching optical fibers to the chip. In practice, the packaging of optical fibers to photonic devices is time consuming, lossy, and expensive. This process is usually done by gluing the fiber and chip together using optical adhesives. By fusion splicing the chip and fiber together we have demonstrated losses as low as 1dB for single fibers and 2.5dB for an array of four fibers.

Imagine a laser as thick as an atom that is compatible with silicon photonics. Silicon based materials are passive. Since silicon is an indirect band gap material it is a poor light emitter. To generate light on a silicon photonic integrated circuit, you need to integrate active materials, which are usually not compatible with CMOS, with the device. Two-dimensional materials are excellent candidates for light sources, modulators, and detectors; and they are compatible with CMOS electronic manufacturing in the back end. We recently demonstrated the first fully on-chip 2D laser. Due to their thickness and transfer process, we envision electronic-photonic devices with many optical layers, each with their own lasers, modulators, and detectors based on 2D materials. Our recent demonstration completes the set of active devices completely based on 2D materials.


Password: 017994

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 - 1:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 991 2584 9377

OSA/SPIE with SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Next Generation Photonics"

Topic: 
Next Generation Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past few decades, silicon photonics has revolutionized photonic integrated circuits by leveraging the semiconductor CMOS manufacturing infrastructure for low cost, high performance devices and systems. However, key fundamental challenges of the field remain unsolved: packaging the devices with optical fibers and generating light on chip.

We developed a novel approach for fiber packaging based on fusing the fiber and chip together. Connecting a silicon photonic chip across long distances requires attaching optical fibers to the chip. In practice, the packaging of optical fibers to photonic devices is time consuming, lossy, and expensive. This process is usually done by gluing the fiber and chip together using optical adhesives. By fusion splicing the chip and fiber together we have demonstrated losses as low as 1dB for single fibers and 2.5dB for an array of four fibers.

Imagine a laser as thick as an atom that is compatible with silicon photonics. Silicon based materials are passive. Since silicon is an indirect band gap material it is a poor light emitter. To generate light on a silicon photonic integrated circuit, you need to integrate active materials, which are usually not compatible with CMOS, with the device. Two-dimensional materials are excellent candidates for light sources, modulators, and detectors; and they are compatible with CMOS electronic manufacturing in the back end. We recently demonstrated the first fully on-chip 2D laser. Due to their thickness and transfer process, we envision electronic-photonic devices with many optical layers, each with their own lasers, modulators, and detectors based on 2D materials. Our recent demonstration completes the set of active devices completely based on 2D materials.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 4, 2020 - 12:05pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 991 2584 9377 (contact organizers for password)

Stanford Photonics Research Center (SPRC) SPECIAL SEMINAR on Global Environmental Measurement and Monitoring Technologies

Topic: 
The Source and Fate of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions
Abstract / Description: 

Fossil fuel burning is the primary driver of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), which recently passed the landmark 400 parts per million mark. Most nations have committed to reducing their emissions under the Paris Agreement and many sub-national entities have made similar commitments. To ensure that the promised emission reductions are achieved, an understanding of emission rates from fossil fuel point sources, cities, regions and countries, and of uptake of carbon into the land and oceans, is critical.

Traditionally, "bottom-up" economic information has been used to determine fossil fuel emission rates, and biomass estimates are used to evaluate the land carbon sink. In this presentation, I will discuss the use of a "top-down" approach that uses atmospheric measurements and modelling that complements the bottom-up method. In particular, I will focus on the use of radiocarbon (14C) in CO2 as a tracer for the fossil fuel component of atmospheric CO2. I will showcase how the method can be used to quantify fossil fuel CO2 emissions and land carbon uptake, giving examples from USA and New Zealand.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Refreshments at 4:00

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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