Optics and Electronics Seminar

OSA/SPIE Seminar: Imaging at the Nanoscale Within Live Brain Tissues

Topic: 
Imaging at the Nanoscale Within Live Brain Tissues
Abstract / Description: 

Single molecule microscopy allows nanometer localization of the detected emitters and subtle probing of their spatio-temporal nano-environment including in living neuronal cells [1]. I will present several single molecule strategies using different nano-emitters to probe complex and confined neuronal environments.

These include the development of a new probe delivery method in the live animal brain to perform the first single quantum dot tracking in acute brain slices [2] and an original strategy based on phase imaging aiming towards 3D single particle tracking and 3D super-resolution microscopy in thick cellular environments [3].

For deep tissue imaging, single walled carbon nanotubes, which bear optical resonances in the near infrared and nanoscale dimensions, are particularly promising [4]. I will show that, long trajectories (>10 min) of nanotubes diffusing in the brain extracellular space can be recorded at the single nanotube level. Analysis their movements provides super-resolved maps of tissue structuration which can be modulated upon biochemical digestion of the brain extracellular matrix in live animals [5].

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

High Precision Motion Control 101: Tools for Emerging Applications [Stanford Optical Society]

Topic: 
High Precision Motion Control 101: Tools for Emerging Applications
Abstract / Description: 

Precision motion control is an important subset of automation, which encompasses a diverse array of applications. Many aspects of optical engineering research and development depend on the appropriate selection and use of sensors, actuators, and controllers. In precision motion projects, the actual needs may vary widely from the originally intended specifications.

Some of the most difficult tasks in optics research require complex multi-axis motion control methods. Some popular examples include Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing), Sample Positioning for Crystallography, and Alignment with Silicon Photonics. In this seminar we will address concepts and challenges in selecting actuator and sensing technologies, as well as the appropriate controller techniques. We will provide researchers with an ability to understand and apply the fundamental concepts for R&D precision motion projects and automation systems.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 1:25pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Scientific Visualization with Blender [Stanford Optical Society Workshop]

Topic: 
Scientific Visualization with Blender
Abstract / Description: 

Have you ever said to yourself: "I'm sure this paper would have been accepted if I had just included a pretty picture..."? The pretty pictures you often see gracing the cover of Nature can be made in a number of ways, from simple sketching in Powerpoint to full-blown 3D modeling. Among the numerous software packages available for 3D computer graphics is Blender, a free and open-source package that can be used for modeling, sculpting, animating, rendering, and more. In this hands-on workshop, I will introduce basic principles of operation for the modeling and rendering of objects in Blender. Together, we will create some simple models before diving into some advanced techniques that are necessary to make images like the one seen below. Are you the type of person that prefers working from the command line? Blender is built on Python, and can be directly manipulated from a Python console or script. I will show you how to perform some unique operations using a simple Python script, with an eye towards visualizing your own data in Blender. Are you simply looking for a method of converting a 2D image into a shiny 3D model? I will also show you how to take an SVG file and turn it into a 3D model in Blender that can be manipulated. This workshop is intended for people that are entirely unfamiliar with Blender software, but the concepts covered can easily be applied to any rendering software of your choice.

This is a hands-on workshop: bring your laptops, a keyboard with a numpad, and a mouse!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
-Venue information will be provided to registered attendees-

Supercontinuum Fiber lasers: Technology and Applications [Stanford Optical Society Seminar]

Topic: 
Supercontinuum Fiber lasers: Technology and Applications
Abstract / Description: 

In the 1970s, wide spectral broadening of intense laser light in a non-linear material, or supercontinuum generation, was first demonstrated in the laboratory. With the development of recent fiber and fiber laser technology, namely compact high power picosecond lasers and micro-structured Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) commercial supercontinuum lasers have become a reality. With a typical spectral bandwidth covering over 2000 nm and output powers exceeding 20W, these sources have proved an invaluable tool. In this talk, we will cover:

  • Fundamentals of how supercontinuum lasers work and the importance on the PCF design in tailoring the spectrum.
  • The properties of supercontinuum laser light and what make them unique sources.
  • The main applications today for supercontinuum laser in imaging, spectroscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and illumination.
  • Supercontinuum technology roadmap and future applications
Date and Time: 
Monday, May 22, 2017 - 11:00am
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Always-On Vision Becomes a Reality [OSA Seminar]

Topic: 
Always-On Vision Becomes a Reality
Abstract / Description: 

Intelligent devices equipped with human-like senses such as always-on touch, audio and motion detection have enabled a variety of new use cases and applications, transforming the way we interact with each other and our surroundings. While the vast majority (>80%) of human insight comes through the eyes, enabling always-on vision (defined as < 1 mA power) for devices is challenging due to power-hungry hardware and the high complexity of inference algorithms. Qualcomm Research has pioneered an Always-on Computer Vision Module (CVM) combining innovations in the system architecture, ultra-low power design and dedicated hardware for vision algorithms running at the "edge." With low end-to-end power consumption, a tiny form factor and low cost, the CVM can be integrated into a wide range of battery- and line-powered devices (IoT, mobile, VR/AR, automotive, etc.), performing object detection, feature recognition, change/motion detection, and other tasks. Its processor performs all computation within the module itself and outputs metadata.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab

Topic: 
New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab
Abstract / Description: 

Lab experiments have long played an important role in behavioral science, in part because they allow for carefully designed tests of theory, and in part because randomized assignment facilitates identification of causal effects. At the same time, lab experiments have traditionally suffered from numerous constraints (e.g. short duration, small-scale, unrepresentative subjects, simplistic design, etc.) that limit their external validity. In this talk I describe how the web in general—and crowdsourcing sites like Amazon's Mechanical Turk in particular—allow researchers to create "virtual labs" in which they can conduct behavioral experiments of a scale, duration, and realism that far exceed what is possible in physical labs. To illustrate, I describe some recent experiments that showcase the advantages of virtual labs, as well as some of the limitations. I then discuss how this relatively new experimental capability may unfold in the future, along with some implications for social and behavioral science.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Insensitivity of Loss Systems under Randomized SQ(d) Algorithms [ISL Colloquium]

Topic: 
Insensitivity of Loss Systems under Randomized SQ(d) Algorithms
Abstract / Description: 

In many applications such as cloud computing, managing server farm resources etc. an incoming task or job has to be matched with an appropriate server in order to minimise the latency or blocking associated with the processing. Ideally the best choice would be to match a job to the fastest available server. However when there are thousands of servers requiring the information on all server tasks is an overkill.

Pioneered in the 1990's the idea of randomised sampling of a few servers was proposed by Vvedenskaya and Dobrushin in Russia and Mitzmenmacher in the US and popularised as the "power of two" schemes which basically means that sampling two servers randomly and sending the job to the "better" server (i.e. with the shortest queue, or most resources) provides most of the benefits of sampling all the servers.

In the talk I will discuss multi-server loss models under power-of-d routing scheme when service time distributions are general with finite mean. Previous works on these models assume that the service times are exponentially distributed and insensitivity was suggested through simulations. Showing insensitivity to service time distributions has remained an open problem. We address this problem by considering service time distributions as Mixed-Erlang distributions that are dense in the class of general distributions on (0, ∞). We derive the mean field equations (MFE) of the empirical distributions for the system and establish the existence and uniqueness of the fixed point of the MFE. Furthermore we show that the fixed point of the MFE corresponds to the fixed point obtained from the MFE corresponding to a system with exponential service times showing that the fixed point is insensitive to the distribution. Due to lack of uniformity of the mixed-Erlang convergence the true general case needs to be handled differently. I will conclude the case of the MFE with general service times showing that the MFE is now characterized by a pde whose stationary point coincides with the fixed point in the case with exponential service times.The techniques developed in this paper are applicable to study mean field limits for Markov processes on general state spaces and insensitivity properties of other queueing models.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 20, 2017 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Quest for Energy Efficiency in Computing Technologies [Applied Physics 483 Optics & Electronics]

Topic: 
Quest for Energy Efficiency in Computing Technologies
Abstract / Description: 

As computing becomes increasingly pervasive in our daily life, it is generally recognized that energy efficiency will be one of the key design considerations for any future computing scheme. Consequently, significant research is currently ongoing on exploring new physics, material systems and system level designs to improve energy efficiency. In this talk, I shall discuss some of our recent progresses in this regard. Specifically, the physics of ordered and correlated systems allow for fundamental improvement of the energy efficiency when a transition happens between two distinguishable states. Our recent experiments show that this theoretical promise can indeed be realized in electronic devices. The resulting gain in energy efficiency could exceed orders of magnitude.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 13, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Synopsys LightTools Hands-On Training [Optical Society Workshop]

Topic: 
Synopsys LightTools Hands-On Training
Abstract / Description: 

Capacity: 18 people

LightTools is a 3D optical engineering and design software product that supports virtual prototyping, simulation, optimization, and photorealistic renderings of illumination applications. Its unique design and analysis capabilities, combined with ease of use, support for rapid design iterations, and automatic system optimization, help to ensure the delivery of illumination designs according to specifications and schedule.

LightTools is used by industry leaders for engineering applications such as LEDs, displays, lighting, solar, automotive, head-mounted displays, projectors, etc.

Please read:

  • This is a hands-on interactive training session; you will need to actively participate.
  • The software runs on Windows. Therefore, you will need a computer that runs Windows for the training.
  • You should register only if you are absolutely sure that you can commit for the full 4-hours.
  • Since it is a hands-on session, the capacity is limited to 18 people. The first 18 people to RSVP will receive the download link, license information, and event location.
  • Please RSPV using the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DSHDMD5
Date and Time: 
Monday, February 27, 2017 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Data-driven, Interactive Scientific Articles in a Collaborative Environment with Authorea [OSA; WEE]

Topic: 
Data-driven, Interactive Scientific Articles in a Collaborative Environment with Authorea
Abstract / Description: 

Most tools that scientists use for the preparation of scholarly manuscripts, such as Microsoft Word and LaTeX, function offline and don't account for the digital-born nature of research objects. Further, most authoring tools in use today are not designed for collaboration. As scientific collaborations grow in size, research transparency and the attribution of scholarly credit are at stake. I will show how Authorea allows scientists to write rich data-driven manuscripts on the web; articles that natively offer readers a dynamic, interactive experience with an article's full text, images, data, and code, paving the way to increased data sharing, research reproducibility, and Open Science. I will also demonstrate how Authorea differs from Overleaf and ShareLaTeX.

 

Please bring your laptop to actively participate in the demo (suggested; not mandatory)

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 12:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 143

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