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Optics and Electronics Seminar

OSA Color Technical Group presents "Modeling the Initial Steps of Human Vision"

Topic: 
Modeling the Initial Steps of Human Vision
Abstract / Description: 

Vision guides thought and action. To do so usefully it must inform us about critical features of the world around us. What we can learn about the world is limited by the initial stages of visual processing. Physicists, biologists and psychologists have created quantitative models of these stages, and these models enable us to quantify the encoded information. We have integrated these models as image computable software: the Image Systems Engineering Toolbox for Biology (ISETBio). The software is an extensible set of open-source modules that model the three-dimensional scene spectral radiance, retinal image formation (physiological optics), spatial sampling by the cone photoreceptor mosaic, fixational eye movements, and phototransduction. This webinar, hosted by the OSA Color Technical Group, will provide an overview of the ISETBio modules as well as examples of how to use the software to understand and model human visual performance.

Hosted By: Color Technical Group

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 - 9:00am

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Workshop on Inverse Design using SPINS"

Topic: 
Workshop on Inverse Design using SPINS
Abstract / Description: 

The goal of this workshop is to provide attendees with a practitioner's perspective of the basic ingredients and tools of inverse design using SPINS [1], a photonic optimization framework developed at Jelena Vuckovic's Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab over the past decade.
SPINS is a flexible inverse-design platform that is compatible with a variety of device parametrizations, electromagnetic solvers, and objective functions. This has enabled SPINS to be used to design and experimentally demonstrate functional devices in a wide variety of different application areas including grating couplers [2-4], optical routing for LiDAR [5], and electron accelerators [6].
In this workshop, we will work through examples of using SPINS to design simple devices, including grating couplers and silicon photonics devices. We will emphasize how attendees can adapt these examples for their own applications and discuss some practical considerations for using inverse-design to produce functional devices. All example code will be available online after the workshop.

[1] Su, L. et al. Nanophotonic inverse design with SPINS: software architecture and practical considerations. Appl. Phys. Rev. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5131263 (2020).
[2] Su, L. et al. Fully-automated optimization of grating couplers. Optics Express, 26(4): 4023–4034, 2018.
[3] Sapra, N. V. et al. Inverse design and demonstration of broadband grating couplers. IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 25, 1–7 (2019).
[4] Dory, etl al. Inverse-designed diamond photonics. Nature Communications, 10(1):3309, 2019.
[5] Yang, K. Skarda, J. et al., Inverse-designed non-reciprocal pulse router for chip-based LiDAR, Nature Photonics DOI: 10.1038/s41566-020-0606-0 (2020)
[6] Sapra, N. V. et al., On-chip integrated laser-driven particle accelerator. Science 367, 79-83 (2020).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 945 5728 7546 (password required)

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Next Generation Photonics"

Topic: 
Next Generation Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past few decades, silicon photonics has revolutionized photonic integrated circuits by leveraging the semiconductor CMOS manufacturing infrastructure for low cost, high performance devices and systems. However, key fundamental challenges of the field remain unsolved: packaging the devices with optical fibers and generating light on chip.

We developed a novel approach for fiber packaging based on fusing the fiber and chip together. Connecting a silicon photonic chip across long distances requires attaching optical fibers to the chip. In practice, the packaging of optical fibers to photonic devices is time consuming, lossy, and expensive. This process is usually done by gluing the fiber and chip together using optical adhesives. By fusion splicing the chip and fiber together we have demonstrated losses as low as 1dB for single fibers and 2.5dB for an array of four fibers.

Imagine a laser as thick as an atom that is compatible with silicon photonics. Silicon based materials are passive. Since silicon is an indirect band gap material it is a poor light emitter. To generate light on a silicon photonic integrated circuit, you need to integrate active materials, which are usually not compatible with CMOS, with the device. Two-dimensional materials are excellent candidates for light sources, modulators, and detectors; and they are compatible with CMOS electronic manufacturing in the back end. We recently demonstrated the first fully on-chip 2D laser. Due to their thickness and transfer process, we envision electronic-photonic devices with many optical layers, each with their own lasers, modulators, and detectors based on 2D materials. Our recent demonstration completes the set of active devices completely based on 2D materials.


Password: 017994

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 - 1:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 991 2584 9377

OSA/SPIE with SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Next Generation Photonics"

Topic: 
Next Generation Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Over the past few decades, silicon photonics has revolutionized photonic integrated circuits by leveraging the semiconductor CMOS manufacturing infrastructure for low cost, high performance devices and systems. However, key fundamental challenges of the field remain unsolved: packaging the devices with optical fibers and generating light on chip.

We developed a novel approach for fiber packaging based on fusing the fiber and chip together. Connecting a silicon photonic chip across long distances requires attaching optical fibers to the chip. In practice, the packaging of optical fibers to photonic devices is time consuming, lossy, and expensive. This process is usually done by gluing the fiber and chip together using optical adhesives. By fusion splicing the chip and fiber together we have demonstrated losses as low as 1dB for single fibers and 2.5dB for an array of four fibers.

Imagine a laser as thick as an atom that is compatible with silicon photonics. Silicon based materials are passive. Since silicon is an indirect band gap material it is a poor light emitter. To generate light on a silicon photonic integrated circuit, you need to integrate active materials, which are usually not compatible with CMOS, with the device. Two-dimensional materials are excellent candidates for light sources, modulators, and detectors; and they are compatible with CMOS electronic manufacturing in the back end. We recently demonstrated the first fully on-chip 2D laser. Due to their thickness and transfer process, we envision electronic-photonic devices with many optical layers, each with their own lasers, modulators, and detectors based on 2D materials. Our recent demonstration completes the set of active devices completely based on 2D materials.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 4, 2020 - 12:05pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 991 2584 9377 (contact organizers for password)

Stanford Photonics Research Center (SPRC) SPECIAL SEMINAR on Global Environmental Measurement and Monitoring Technologies

Topic: 
The Source and Fate of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions
Abstract / Description: 

Fossil fuel burning is the primary driver of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), which recently passed the landmark 400 parts per million mark. Most nations have committed to reducing their emissions under the Paris Agreement and many sub-national entities have made similar commitments. To ensure that the promised emission reductions are achieved, an understanding of emission rates from fossil fuel point sources, cities, regions and countries, and of uptake of carbon into the land and oceans, is critical.

Traditionally, "bottom-up" economic information has been used to determine fossil fuel emission rates, and biomass estimates are used to evaluate the land carbon sink. In this presentation, I will discuss the use of a "top-down" approach that uses atmospheric measurements and modelling that complements the bottom-up method. In particular, I will focus on the use of radiocarbon (14C) in CO2 as a tracer for the fossil fuel component of atmospheric CO2. I will showcase how the method can be used to quantify fossil fuel CO2 emissions and land carbon uptake, giving examples from USA and New Zealand.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 12, 2020 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 3, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry"

Topic: 
Applications of Precision Motion Control in the Optics and Photonics Industry
Abstract / Description: 

Refreshments at 4:00

Precision Automation has become a rapidly growing industry as manufacturers must develop ways to achieve ever-tightening tolerances. Likewise, research must push the envelope in order to maintain the increasingly advancing pace of technology. Aerotech has been providing assistance and solutions to researchers within academia and laboratories worldwide for 50 years and continues to empower students and technicians to complete and publish their research. In this seminar, we will discuss why automation and motion control is important as well as the various methods by which Aerotech has helped expand the boundaries of research in the field of optics and photonics. The topics we will cover in this session include:

  • What Precision Motion Control is and why it is important
  • How to choose the right set of motion control
  • How Aerotech has helped further research in:
    • Optics design and manufacturing
    • Light sources and beamlines
    • Optical positioning and ultra-fast spectroscopy
    • Fiber alignment
    • Laser Processing
    • Additive Manufacturing

After the presentation, a round-table discussion will be held during which we'd like to hear from you! Please bring with you any topics and - more importantly - any tough issues that you'd like to pose pertaining to automated motion control within your specific research field.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Innovation in the Laser Industry"

Topic: 
Innovation in the Laser Industry
Abstract / Description: 
Spectra-Physics was a startup when Prof. Byer was a summer student in 1964.  By the time Alan Petersen and Jim Kafka joined in the early 1980s, the company had matured and aspired to be all things in lasers.  We will discuss the changes in the laser industry since that time and the role of innovation within the company to drive growth and broaden the product offerings from scientific lasers to industrial laser systems.
 
PLEASE RVP TO GUARANTEE A SPOT.
Date and Time: 
Monday, March 9, 2020 - 12:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 299

OSA/SPIE present "A revolution in high-performance computing driven by CMOS-integrated photonics"

Topic: 
A revolution in high-performance computing driven by CMOS-integrated photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Recent years have seen an explosive growth in bandwidth requirements at all levels of computing, from consumer-grade GPUs to datacenters and supercomputers. Consensus is growing that traditional interconnect development is reaching its limits. Electrical I/O is limited to line data rates of around 112 Gbps, given physical limits of copper and dielectrics losses, and noise. Proposed approaches to surpass this limit increasingly offer higher rates without providing any real benefit; bandwidth comes with degradation of power consumption, complexity, and cost. Furthermore, the 112 Gbps limit is achievable only over very short distances, constraining the architecture of computer systems.

Photonic I/O is the only viable, near-term path to increasing data rates, and to solving the problems of power consumption, bandwidth, and latency faced by electrical I/O. Its low latency and low propagation loss can enable new "disaggregated" computer architectures, with separate chips of memory and logic linked over larger distances for more efficient utilization.

Ayar labs is pursuing a photonic interconnect solution that involves an external multi-wavelength laser source, an integrated transceiver chip with photonics densely integrated along with CMOS circuits, along with advanced chip packaging and optical-fiber connectivity. The transceiver chip integrates electro-optic modulators and detectors with analog drivers, control logic, and SERDES, taking advantage of dense integration to reduce parasitics, power consumption, latency, and packaging costs. Micro-rings provide wavelength-division multiplexing of many channels needed to achieve high capacity per chip edge at low power consumption. This development comes at an exciting time: the emergence of a large-scale process for CMOS-compatible photonics along with and advanced packaging ecosystem is converging with an acute market need for bandwidth density.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 11, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Special MSE Colloquium presents "Spatiotemporal Metaphotonics"

Topic: 
Spatiotemporal Metaphotonics
Abstract / Description: 

Materials are often used to manipulate waves. Metamaterials have provided far-reaching possibilities in achieving "extremes" in such wave-matter interaction. Various exciting functionalities have been achieved in exploiting metamaterials and metasurfaces in nanophotonics and nano-optics. We have been exploring how spatiotemporal metamaterials can give us new platforms in metaphotonics for exploiting waves to do certain useful functions for us. Several scenarios are being investigated in my group. As one scenario, we have been developing metastructure platforms that can perform analog computation such as solving integral and differential equations and inverting matrices with waves as waves interact with them. Such "metamaterial machines" can function as wave-based analog computing machines, suitable for micro- and nanoscale integration. Another scenario deals with 4-dimensional metamaterials, in which temporal variation of material parameters is added to the tools of spatial inhomogeneities for manipulating light-matter interaction with spatiotemporal platforms. The third category for metaphotonics is the concept of near-zero-index materials, structures and associated photonic doping that exhibit unique features in light-matter interaction, opening doors to exciting new wave-based and quantum optical features. In this talk, I will present some of our ongoing work on extreme and spatiotemporal material platforms for metaphotonics, and will forecast possible future research directions in these paradigms.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 4, 2020 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Durand 450

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