Graduate

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

Topic: 
QED and Symbolic QED: Dramatic Improvements in SoC Validation and Debug
Abstract / Description: 

Ensuring the correctness of integrated circuits (ICs) is essential for ensuring correctness, safety and security of electronic systems we rely on. As ICs continue to grow in size and complexity, the cost and effort required to validate them are growing at an unsustainable rate. To make matters worse, difficult bugs escape into post-silicon and even production systems.

We present the Quick Error Detection (QED) technique which targets post-silicon validation and debug challenges. QED drastically reduces error detection latency, the time elapsed between the occurrence of an error caused by a bug and its manifestation as an observable failure. Inspired by QED, we also present Symbolic QED which uses a formal engine to detect and localize bugs during both pre- and post-silicon validation.

Experimental results collected using several state-of-the-art commercial hardware platforms, as well as results obtained from from simulations of various difficult bug scenarios that occurred in commercial multi-core System-on-Chips (SoCs), demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of QED and Symbolic QED:

Reduction in error detection latencies of up to 9 orders of magnitude, from billions of clock cycles to very few clock cycles.
Up to 4-fold improvement in bug coverage.
For an open-source industrial multi-core SoC consisting of approximately half-a-billion transistors, difficult logic bugs can be localized in only a few hours. In contrast, it might take days or weeks (or even months) of manual work (per bug) when traditional techniques are used.


 

The Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium (EE380) meets on Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 throughout the academic year. Talks are given before a live audience in Room B03 in the basement of the Gates Computer Science Building on the Stanford Campus. The live talks (and the videos hosted at Stanford and on YouTube) are open to the public.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

Topic: 
Quantum Computing as a Service
Abstract / Description: 

QC Ware will present a business-oriented overview of quantum computing, from the perspective of a start-up that is developing software and tools to address real-world QC use cases. The presentation will cover the strategic and practical considerations of launching a QC software company.


 

The Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium (EE380) meets on Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 throughout the academic year. Talks are given before a live audience in Room B03 in the basement of the Gates Computer Science Building on the Stanford Campus. The live talks (and the videos hosted at Stanford and on YouTube) are open to the public.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 10, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SmartGrid Seminar

Topic: 
Security Trends and Challenges for the Smart Grid
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber and physical security are critical priorities for electric power utilities. The increasing complexity of the electrical grid and the growing sophistication of attackers drive the need for strong cyber security in all domains of the electric sector. It is a threat that is global in nature and affects every utility, from large state-owned utilities down to small co-ops. This seminar will review ongoing research in protective measures, threat and incident management, and situational awareness for the electric sector. It will also identify current research gaps that must be addressed to support the resiliency of the next-generation grid.


 

SmartGrid Seminar Winter 2016: Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1:00 pm or 1:15 pm approximately every Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

SmartGrid Seminar

Topic: 
Transient Stability Analysis of an all Converter Interfaced Generation WECC system
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, a transient stability analysis of an 18205 bus Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system has been carried out when all conventional sources have been replaced with converter interfaced generation (CIG). A novel positive sequence model of the converter based sources has been developed in commercial transient stability analysis software. A simple and computationally economical model of the converter has been developed while ensuring a reliable representation of the detailed converter behavior. This model has been implemented as a user defined model in commercial positive sequence software such as PSLF. The behavior of the proposed model in positive sequence has the same form as the behavior obtained from detailed point on wave simulation. In this 100% CIG system, the only rotating machines directly connected to the network are wound rotor induction generator wind turbines and induction motor loads. The inertia contribution of these rotating devices is small. With close to zero inertia in the system, the dynamic performance of the system under different contingencies is examined and discussed. The analysis conducted demonstrates that while such a futuristic system can survive certain contingencies, well designed coordinated wide-area converter control action may have to be incorporated to enhance the reliability of the system. The examination of the importance of modeling the source behind the inverter due to practical limitations on the size of the dc bus capacitor is also considered emphasized.


 

SmartGrid Seminar Winter 2016: Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1:00 pm or 1:15 pm approximately every Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 3, 2016 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

SmartGrid Seminar

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

SmartGrid Seminar Winter 2016: Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1:00 pm or 1:15 pm approximately every Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 18, 2016 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

SmartGrid Seminar

Topic: 
Enabling the Grid of the Future
Abstract / Description: 

Electrical power distribution system of the future requires innovations. Some of its key technological and economic challenges lie in the attempt to: make electricity affordable throughout the world, allow local/distributed and time-varying generation, allow storage and load to be seamlessly integrated independent of utility, utilize modern power electronics, use networked distributed computing to provide the dynamic load-supply balance and stability, provide pay-as-you-go payment system for real-time market transactions.

I will present one perspective that touches upon different pieces of the overall solution stack: hardware design, safety, firmware, distributed intelligence, stability and control, economically optimized power distribution and trading mechanisms, systems architecture and communication, etc. Then, I will concentrate on our optimization framework for general AC/DC smart grids, based on the sequential convex programming, and its connection to the "faster" controls that ensure the grid's robustness to noise and unpredicted changes. This will include a discussion on distributed solutions that are based on the proximal message passing, and the properties of our implementation: physical stability, economic optimality of the resulting operating regime, robustness, and scalability with respect to the system size (number of devices attached to a grid), etc.


 

SmartGrid Seminar Winter 2016: Our speakers will discuss exciting new ideas and technologies that are changing the electricity industry. The theme of the seminar series is on smart grids and energy systems, with speakers from academic institutions and industry. The hour-long seminars, including ample time for discussion, are held at 1:00 pm or 1:15 pm approximately every Thursday.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 300

IT-Forum

Topic: 
Asymptotically tight bounds on the depth of estimated context trees
Abstract / Description: 

We study the maximum depth of context tree estimates, i.e., the maximum Markov order attainable by an estimated tree model given an input sequence of length n. We consider two classes of estimators:

1) Penalized maximum likelihood (PML) estimators where a context tree T is obtained by minimizing a cost of the form -log P_T(x^n) + f(n)|S_T|, where P_T(x^n) is the ML probability of the input sequence x^n under a tree model T, S_T is the set of states defined by T, and f(n) is an increasing (penalization) function of n (the popular BIC estimator corresponds to f(n)= (A-1)/2 log n, where A is the size of the input alphabet).

2) MDL estimators based on the KT probability assignment. In each case we derive an asymptotic upper bound, n^{1/2 + o(1)}, and we exhibit explicit input sequences that show that this bound is asymptotically tight up to the term o(1) in the exponent.

It is based on joint work with Gadiel Seroussi.


 

The Information Theory Forum (IT-Forum) at Stanford ISL is an interdisciplinary academic forum which focuses on mathematical aspects of information processing. With a primary emphasis on information theory, we also welcome researchers from signal processing, learning and statistical inference, control and optimization to deliver talks at our forum. We also warmly welcome industrial affiliates in the above fields. The forum is typically held in Packard 202 every Friday at 1:00 pm during the academic year.

The Information Theory Forum is organized by graduate students Jiantao Jiao and Kartik Venkat. To suggest speakers, please contact any of the students.

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Mentoring Moments: Group Mock Interviews with Stanford Engineering Alumni

Topic: 
Mentoring Moments: Group Mock Interviews with Stanford Engineering Alumni
Abstract / Description: 

Improve your interviewing skills and gain more confidence about securing a position!

Engineering and SE3 alumni, representing a variety of industries and backgrounds, will conduct mock non-technical interviews with groups of 4-5 students. You'll benefit from the feedback from your peers and alumni while making new connections at the same time. You are also invited to attend our informal networking dinner from 6:00-6:30 pm to connect with alums and hear their success stories prior to your mock interview. Please be sure to arrive to your mock interview by 6:30 pm.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 6:00pm to 8:30pm
Venue: 
BEAM, 563 Salvatierra Walk, Second Floor Conference Room

Technical Interviewing Lab for Software Engineering

Topic: 
Technical Interviewing Lab for Software Engineering
Abstract / Description: 

In this interactive lab led by software engineers at companies that recruit on campus, we'll discuss technical interviewing strategies and tips. We'll share best practices and techniques to help you succeed in interviews. Walk away feeling well-prepared, as you'll also have the opportunity to ask questions and address concerns.

Please RSVP: https://stanford.joinhandshake.com/events/11253

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2016 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
BEAM, 563 Salvatierra Walk, Second Floor Conference Room

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