EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Graduate

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Discovering the Highest Energy Neutrinos"

Topic: 
Discovering the Highest Energy Neutrinos
Abstract / Description: 

The detection of high energy astrophysical neutrinos is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators. IceCube, a large optical detector at the South Pole, has observed the first astrophysical neutrinos and identified at least one potential source. However, the best sensitivity at the highest energies comes from detectors that look for coherent radio Cherenkov emission from neutrino interactions. I will give an overview of the state of current experimental efforts, including recent results, and then discuss a suite of new experiments designed to discover neutrinos at the highest energies and push the energy threshold for radio detection down to overlap with the energy range probed by IceCube, thus covering the full astrophysical energy range out to the highest energies, and opening up new phase space for discovery. These include ground-based experiments such as RNO-G and IceCube-Gen2, as well as the balloon-borne experiment PUEO.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 946 67 170 862; +passcode

US-Asia Technology Mgmt Ctr panel discussion "Pinktober: Save More Than A Life"

Topic: 
Pinktober: Save More Than A Life
Abstract / Description: 

October 27 Pinktober: Save More Than A Life

Join for a panel discussion launching a campaign to accelerate screening of women in under-served communities in India and Africa.

Presented by: Aaroogya Foundation and Silicon Valley Global Health in cooperation with the Indian National Women's Hockey Team, Pinga Healthtech, and the US-Asia Technology Management Center at Stanford University

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 8:30am

US-Asia Technology Management Center presents "Autonomous Vehicles and the Digital Transformation of the Automotive Industry in Asia"

Topic: 
Autonomous Vehicles and the Digital Transformation of the Automotive Industry in Asia
Abstract / Description: 

Join US-ATMC for a seminar with Dr. James Peng which will focus on how autonomous vehicles are impacting and transforming the automotive industry and possibly other areas around ground transportation industries. With autonomous vehicles, there are a new set of industry players that may be poised to disrupt the existing old guard. The evolution of self-driving vehicles is also revealing major shifts in the global center of gravity of the automotive industry — toward Asia. This seminar will share perspectives on how these trends appear at present and how they may evolve in the future.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 4:30pm

SCIEN and EE292E present "Quanta Image Sensors: Concept, Progress and Commercialization"

Topic: 
Quanta Image Sensors: Concept, Progress and Commercialization
Abstract / Description: 

The Quanta Image Sensor (QIS), a photon-counting image sensor, counts each electron generated in the sensor chip and then applies computational imaging to create a gray scale image or extract other information. First proposed in 2005, the QIS has been implemented starting around 2015 by using a CMOS image sensor (CIS) based approach, CIS-QIS, and by using a single-photon avalanche detector (SPAD) approach, SPAD-QIS. Both are visible-light devices based on silicon. This talk will focus on the CIS-QIS developed at Dartmouth and being commercialized by Gigajot with computational imaging development at Purdue and Gigajot. The CIS-QIS device has been demonstrated with up to 20Mpixels per chip and does not use avalanche multiplication which allows for small pixels with low power dissipation.

The talk will start with the QIS concept including strategies for high dynamic range and photon-number resolution, as well as a review of the work at Dartmouth. A brief comparison with SPAD-QIS that permits fast timing resolution but with larger pixels and lower resolution will be made. Next, computational imaging approaches and results including high dynamic range and low-light neural-net image classification will be presented. Work underway at Gigajot including color imaging and potential commercial applications will then be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 - 4:30pm

Stanford Biotechnology Symposium

Topic: 
Stanford Biotechnology Symposium
Abstract / Description: 

Stanford Biotechnology Symposium 2020


You are cordially invited to attend a special 2-hour symposium, hosted by the Stanford-NIH Biotechnology Predoctoral Training Grant program.
The goal of this annual symposium is to highlight exciting cutting-edge research at Stanford, and to also facilitate broader connections and community building around biotechnology at Stanford and the Bay Area. We hope you will join us!

When: Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Where: Virtual (via Zoom, registration required)

Time: 2 pm to 4 pm (PST)

 

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 2:00pm

2020 Brown Institute Showcase

Topic: 
2020 Brown Institute Showcase
Abstract / Description: 

Maneesh Agrawala and Mark Hansen cordially invite you to the

Brown Institute for Media Innovation's Annual Showcase!

Join us for a reception starting at 4pm PT / 7pm ET on October 15, 2020

The event features a unique mix of journalists and technologists, all funded through the 2019-20 Magic Grant program — this is their moment to show off a year's worth of work. The event will take place on a unique virtual platform allowing visitors to mingle with directors and staff, and meet individually with grantees while they demo their projects.

The projects this year are incredibly strong. Each one addresses an important contemporary question, be it political, cultural or technical — from a tool that can assist in analyzing the last ten years of 24/7 TV news coverage; to a solutions journalism approach to tracking and reporting on maternal mortality in Nigeria; to a new tool that securely transforms a smartphone into a socially-minded diagnostic device offering insights into digital behavior; to the first comprehensive database of human rights violations in Pakistan.

Register here and stay tuned for more information about the event! Learn more about the projects showcasing on the Brown Institute site.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 4:00pm

ISL colloquium presents "Computational Barriers to Estimation from Low-Degree Polynomials"

Topic: 
Computational Barriers to Estimation from Low-Degree Polynomials
Abstract / Description: 

One fundamental goal of high-dimensional statistics is to detect or recover planted structure (such as a low-rank matrix) hidden in noisy data. A growing body of work studies low-degree polynomials as a restricted model of computation for such problems. Many leading algorithmic paradigms (such as spectral methods and approximate message passing) can be captured by low-degree polynomials, and thus, lower bounds against low-degree polynomials serve as evidence for computational hardness of statistical problems.

Prior work has studied the power of low-degree polynomials for the detection (i.e. hypothesis testing) task. In this work, we extend these methods to address problems of estimating (i.e. recovering) the planted signal instead of merely detecting its presence. For a large class of "signal plus noise" problems, we give a user-friendly lower bound for the best possible mean squared error achievable by any degree-D polynomial. These are the first results to establish low-degree hardness of recovery problems for which the associated detection problem is easy. As applications, we study the planted submatrix and planted dense subgraph problems, resolving (in the low-degree framework) open problems about the computational complexity of recovery in both cases.

Joint work with Tselil Schramm, available at: https://arxiv.org/abs/2008.02269

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom registration required

AP/Physics colloquium presents "Frontiers in Cosmic Magnetism and in Many-Body Physics"

Topic: 
Frontiers in Cosmic Magnetism and in Many-Body Physics
Abstract / Description: 

Galaxies like our Milky Way host large-scale, weak magnetic fields. The interstellar magnetic field affects a wide range of physics, from cosmic ray propagation to star formation. The magnetic interstellar medium is also a formidable foreground for experimental cosmology, particularly for the quest to find signatures of inflation in the polarized cosmic microwave background. Despite its importance, the Galactic magnetic field and its role in interstellar processes remain poorly understood. Susan Clark will discuss a few of the big questions that drive her research on cosmic magnetism.

Many-body physics is concerned with the emergent properties - those that characterize the collectivity but not the individual constituents - of macroscopic systems with large numbers of strongly interacting particles. Ensembles of many interacting particles can support qualitatively new phenomena, with the same system able to exist in different universal phases of matter with sharply distinct properties. Due to a variety of conceptual and experimentally motivated reasons, the modern theory of quantum many body systems is largely built around the study of low-temperature and near-equilibrium properties of time independent Hamiltonians. However, such systems represent a small subset of the possible quantum mechanical descriptions of a physical system - which allow for more general unitary evolutions interrupted by non-unitary measurements. Vedika Khemani will describe some highlights of an active research program to advance many-body theory beyond the regime of near-equilibrium time-independent Hamiltonians, with a view towards uncovering complex emergent phenomena in new non-equilibrium regimes. These theoretical efforts are synergistic with recent advances in building controllable quantum devices that naturally implement more general time evolutions generated by circuits of unitary gates, starting from initial states that are not "low energy" in any useful sense.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 6, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 96054036699; +password

Celebrate Stanford on the Moon (SOM) 20th Anniversary

Topic: 
Celebrate Stanford on the Moon (SOM) 20th Anniversary
Abstract / Description: 

Virtual: Celebrate Stanford on the Moon (SOM) 20th Anniversary


The celebration will feature:

  • Two Stanford Women Astronauts on First Woman on the Moon – will she be from Stanford?
  • Stanford alum working on NASA Returns to the Moon – Artemis Project
  • Panel to discuss education for the generations that will work on the Moon
  • SOM Award recipients will be announced

Via [Zoom] – RSVP by Wednesday, October 14 – please email: stanfordonthemoon@spaceagepub.com