Graduate

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents Optional Static Typing for Python

Topic: 
Optional Static Typing for Python
Abstract / Description: 

Python is a dynamically typed language, and some of its appeal derives from this. Nevertheless, especially for large code bases, it would be nice if a compiler could find type errors before the code is even run. Optional static type checking promises exactly this, and over the past four years we have successfully introduced this feature into Python 3. This talk introduces the type system we've adopted and the syntax used for type annotations, some tips on how to get started with a large existing code base, and our experience using the 'mypy' type checker at Dropbox. The entire system is open source, and has also been adopted by other companies such as Lyft, Quora and Facebook.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Final EE267: VR project demos & posters

Topic: 
VR project demos & posters
Abstract / Description: 

You are cordially invited to come see the demos and posters presented by the EE267 students!

Spring quarter at Stanford is coming to an end and with that our latest offering of EE267 "Virtual Reality" (more info). The students have been working hard on their course projects for the last few weeks and will present demos and posters of innovative VR technology and applications they have been working on to the public – come check them out!

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 001

Special Seminar: Automating Customizable Computing — From DSLs to FPGAs for Deep Learning and Beyond

Topic: 
Automating Customizable Computing — From DSLs to FPGAs for Deep Learning and Beyond
Abstract / Description: 

In the past decade, CDSC has been exploring customizable computing, which emphasizes extensive use of customized accelerators on programmable fabrics for much greater performance and energy efficiency. With Intel's $17B acquisition of Altera in 2015 and Amazon's introduction of FPGAs in its AWS public cloud in 2017, customizable computing is going from advanced research into mainstream computing.

Although the performance and energy efficiency benefits have been clearly demonstrated, a significant challenges, however, is the efficient design and implementation of various acceleration on FPGAs, which is a barrier to many software programmers. In this talk, I shall talk about our effort on developing an automated compilation flow from high-level programming languages to FPGAs. I start with a quick review of our early work on high-level synthesis. Then, I shall present our recent effort on source-code level transformation and optimization for customizable computing, including support of high-level domain-specific languages (DSL) for deep learning (with Caffe or TensorFlow), imaging processing (with Halide), and big-data processing (with Spark), and support automated compilation to customized microarchitecture templates, such as systolic arrays, stencils, and CPP (composable parallel and pipelined).

Date and Time: 
Monday, June 11, 2018 - 2:30pm
Venue: 
Gates 304

SmartGrid Seminar: Future Power System Control Functions: An Industry Perspective

Topic: 
Future Power System Control Functions: An Industry Perspective
Abstract / Description: 

This talk provides an overview of Siemens Corporate Technology's recent research on new control functions for future power systems. Three different topics are discussed: (a) adaptive power oscillation damping optimization to increase the stability reserve of power systems, (b) robust power flow optimization to increase power system resilience to volatile generation, and (c) new research challenges for autonomous microgrids that provide autonomous operation and plug-and-produce capabilities.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

OSA/SPIE Seminar: Computational Optics for Multidimensional Nanoscale Imaging of Single Fluorescent Molecules

Topic: 
Computational Optics for Multidimensional Nanoscale Imaging of Single Fluorescent Molecules
Abstract / Description: 

Visualizing the dynamic movements and interactions between biomolecules remains a challenge, motivating the development of new optical technology and computational algorithms for imaging at the nanoscale. We have built two technologies for multidimensional imaging of single molecules (SMs): the Tri-spot point spread function (PSF) and the Robust Statistical Estimation (RoSE) algorithm. The Tri-spot PSF measures each second moment of SM orientation with near-uniform sensitivity, thereby capturing the orientation and rotational diffusion of SMs using just one camera frame. For 3D imaging, we developed RoSE to minimize the vectorial localization errors in super-resolution microscopy that result from both the structure of the sample and the PSF itself. By estimating the likelihood of a blinking event to be present in each imaging frame, RoSE localizes molecules accurately and minimizes false localizations even when images overlap.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 7, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

ISL Colloquium: A Differential View of Reliable Communications

Topic: 
A Differential View of Reliable Communications
Abstract / Description: 

This talk introduces a "differential" approach to information theory. In contrast to the more traditional "elemental" approach, in which we work to understand communication networks by studying the behavior of their elements in isolation, the differential approach works to understand the impact components can have on the larger networks in which they are employed. Results achieved through this differential viewpoint highlight some startling facts about network communications -- including both opportunities where even very small changes to a communication network can have a big impact on network performance and vulnerabilities where small failures can cause big harm.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN Talk, eWear seminar: 'Immersive Technology and AI' with focus on mobile AR research

Topic: 
'Immersive Technology and AI' with focus on mobile AR research
Abstract / Description: 

Talk Title: Saliency in VR: How Do People Explore Virtual Environments,presented by Vincent Sitzmann

Understanding how people explore immersive virtual environments is crucial for many applications, such as designing virtual reality (VR) content, developing new compression algorithms, or learning computational models of saliency or visual attention. Whereas a body of recent work has focused on modeling saliency in desktop viewing conditions, VR is very different from these conditions in that viewing behavior is governed by stereoscopic vision and by the complex interaction of head orientation, gaze, and other kinematic constraints. To further our understanding of viewing behavior and saliency in VR, we capture and analyze gaze and head orientation data of 169 users exploring stereoscopic, static omni-directional panoramas, for a total of 1980 head and gaze trajectories for three different viewing conditions. We provide a thorough analysis of our data, which leads to several important insights, such as the existence of a particular fixation bias, which we then use to adapt existing saliency predictors to immersive VR conditions. In addition, we explore other applications of our data and analysis, including automatic alignment of VR video cuts, panorama thumbnails, panorama video synopsis, and saliency-based compression.

Talk Title: "Immersive Technology and AI" with focus on mobile AR research

Abstract: not available

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: GW170817: Hearing and Seeing a Binary Neutron Star Merger

Topic: 
GW170817: Hearing and Seeing a Binary Neutron Star Merger
Abstract / Description: 

With the discovery of GW170817 in gravitational waves, and the discovery of an associated short gamma-ray burst, and the discovery of an associated optical afterglow, we have finally entered the era of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We will discuss LIGO/Virgo's detection of this binary coalescence and focus on some of the scientific implications, including insight into the origin of gold and platinum in the universe, tests of black holes and general relativity, elucidation of the formation mechanisms for black holes and neutron stars, and the first standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: Artificial Intelligence: Current and Future Paradigms and Implications

Topic: 
Artificial Intelligence: Current and Future Paradigms and Implications
Abstract / Description: 

Artificial intelligence has advanced rapidly in the last five years. This talk intends to provide high level answers to questions like:

  • What can the evolution of intelligence in the animal kingdom teach us about the evolution of AI?
  • How should people who are not AI researchers view the societal transformation that is now underway? What are some of the social, economic, and political implications of this technology as it exists now?
  • What will future AI systems likely be capable of, and what are the largest expected impacts of these systems?

The talk will be understandable for non-computer scientists.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 30, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

US-ATMC (EE402) Seminar: New Trends Among Asia-focused Accelerators — Incubating at a Distance

Topic: 
New Trends Among Asia-focused Accelerators — Incubating at a Distance
Abstract / Description: 

New Trends Among Asia-focused Accelerators — Incubating at a Distance

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Skilling Auditorium, 494 Lomita Mall

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