EE Student Information

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 EE Student Information, Spring & Summer Quarters 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

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Graduate

Probability Seminar presents "Distribution of descents (and other permutation statistics) in conjugacy classes of S_n"

Topic: 
Distribution of descents (and other permutation statistics) in conjugacy classes of S_n
Abstract / Description: 

The distribution of descents in Sn, the symmetric group, have been previously studied. This talk starts with a bijective proof (using tableaux) of the symmetry of the descents and major indices in matchings (fixed point free involutions) and uses a generating function approach to prove a central theorem for descents in matchings. This approach will be extended to prove central limit theorems for descents in all conjugacy classes of Sn, and to other permutation statistics, such as peaks and major indices.

This is joint work with Sangchul Lee (UCLA) and should be accessible to all graduate students.

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 20, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Meeting ID 98027417672

Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics presents "Continuum Quantum Field Theories for Fractons"

Topic: 
Continuum Quantum Field Theories for Fractons
Abstract / Description: 

Starting with a lattice system at short distances, its long-distance behavior is captured by a continuum Quantum Field Theory (QFT). This description is universal, i.e. it is independent of most of the details of the microscopic system. Surprisingly, certain recently discovered lattice systems, and in particular models of fractons, seem to violate this general dogma. Motivated by this apparent contradiction, we will present exotic continuum QFTs that describe these systems.

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 27, 2020 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 165 492 015

Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics presents "Replica wormhole and information retrieval in the SYK model coupled to Majorana chains"

Topic: 
Replica wormhole and information retrieval in the SYK model coupled to Majorana chains
Abstract / Description: 

Motivated by recent studies of the information paradox in (1+1)-D anti-de Sitter spacetime with a bath described by a (1+1)-D conformal field theory, we study the dynamics of second Rényi entropy of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model (χ) coupled to a Majorana chain bath (ψ). The system is prepared in the thermofield double (TFD) state and then evolved by HL+HR. For small system-bath coupling, we find that the second Rényi entropy S(2)χL,χR of the SYK model undergoes a first order transition during the evolution. In the sense of holographic duality, the long-time solution corresponds to a "replica wormhole". The transition time corresponds to the Page time of a black hole coupled to a thermal bath. We further study the information scrambling and retrieval by introducing a classical control bit, which controls whether or not we add a perturbation in the SYK system. The mutual information between the bath and the control bit shows a positive jump at the Page time, indicating that the entanglement wedge of the bath includes an island in the holographic bulk.

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 20, 2020 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom id: 165-492-015

SystemX presents "Astrobee ISS Free Flyers: Overview and Enabling Technologies"

Topic: 
Astrobee ISS Free Flyers: Overview and Enabling Technologies
Abstract / Description: 

The Astrobee robots began operations on the International Space Station (ISS) in April of 2019. These 32-cm-wide, 9-kg, cube-shaped free flyers are capable of autonomously traversing the US Orbital Segment of ISS and performing tasks to assist astronauts in their day-to-day activities. The Astrobee Facility also provides an on-orbit testbed for guest scientists desiring to try new technologies in zero-g. This presentation will provide an overview of the Astrobee system and some of its key enabling technologies, including propulsion, navigation, and human interfaces. Additional information and publications can be found on the Astrobee website: nasa.gov/astrobee.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 23, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

SystemX presents "On-chip LIDAR with inverse design"

Topic: 
On-chip LIDAR with inverse design
Abstract / Description: 

LIDAR can provide detailed spatial maps of an environment, a capability that is essential for applica- tions such as autonomous driving, robotics, building modeling, or augmented reality. Bulky optical elements and moving parts in current LIDAR systems have unfortunately made these systems heavy, expensive, and vibration-sensitive. Solid-state optical devices for the functionalities required for a LIDAR system have therefore driven much integrated photonics research in recent years. For on-chip beam-steering, optical phased arrays (OPAs) have emerged as a promising solution; however, the size and efficiency specifications for an effective LIDAR-OPA design have remained challenging for classical photonics design methods. In this talk, I will present how photonic inverse design methods can improve OPA design. Unlike classical photonic design, inverse design allows for arbitrary device geometries through the use of advanced elec- tromagnetic optimization methods. The extra degrees of freedom these methods provide has resulted in numerous new photonic devices with improved efficiency, reduced on-chip footprint or novel functionali- ties. Leveraging these new capabilities, we demonstrate an OPA design with a larger scanning cone and a smaller operating bandwidth as compared to the classical photonic design solutions.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 16, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics presents "On the Entropy of an Einstein-Rosen Bridge"

Topic: 
On the Entropy of an Einstein-Rosen Bridge
Abstract / Description: 

We propose a new link between entropy and area: an eternal black hole with an ER bridge with cross-section A can carry quantum information, or be in a mixed state, with entropy S ≤ A/4GN . We provide evidence for our proposal in the context of AdS3 and JT gravity, by using the Island prescription and replica wormhole method for computing the Renyi entropy. We argue that a typical two sided black hole is described by a 'thermo-mixed double' state with only classical correlations between the two sides. Our reasoning suggests that an ER wormhole acts like a topological quantum memory, similar to the toric code.

Zoom id: 165-492-015 (Please note that this is a recurring id, valid till May 11.)

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 13, 2020 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Opportunities in Solar Research and Entrepreneurship

Topic: 
Opportunities in Solar Research and Entrepreneurship
Abstract / Description: 

Renewable energy generation, storage and energy efficiency are being rapidly integrated into our digitized buildings, transportation system and electric grid. Exponentially expanding opportunities for entrepreneurs to commercialize new products are blossoming. This talk will highlight examples of the wide-ranging resources available to help start-up initiatives accelerate cycles of learning and bring innovations to market. Some specific resources to be reviewed include:

  • Stanford's TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy Innovation Transfer
  • The NSF I-Corps Program adapted from Steve Blank's Stanford Lean LaunchPad class
  • The Elemental Accelerator in East Palo Alto
  • Emily Kirsch's PowerHouse Incubator and PowerHouse Ventures in Oakland
  • Cyclotron Road at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Industry Growth Forum and Innovation Incubator
  • The Department of Energy Solar Prize
  • Dorothy Jones-Davis' Nation of Makers
  • The American-Made Partner Network
Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 23, 2020 - 2:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

QFarm Quantum Seminar Series presents "Generalized amplitude damping channel: The single greatest qubit mystery in quantum Shannon theory"

Topic: 
Generalized amplitude damping channel: The single greatest qubit mystery in quantum Shannon theory
Abstract / Description: 

The generalized amplitude damping channel (GADC) is one of the sources of noise in superconducting-circuit-based quantum computing. It can be viewed as the qubit analogue of the bosonic thermal channel, and it thus can be used to model lossy processes in the presence of background noise for low-temperature systems. In this work, we provide an information-theoretic study of the GADC. We first determine the parameter range for which the GADC is entanglement breaking and the range for which it is anti-degradable. We then establish several upper bounds on its classical, quantum, and private capacities. These bounds are based on data-processing inequalities and the uniform continuity of information-theoretic quantities, as well as other techniques. Our upper bounds on the quantum capacity of the GADC are tighter than the known upper bound reported recently in [Rosati et al., Nat. Commun. 9, 4339 (2018)] for the entire parameter range of the GADC, thus reducing the gap between the lower and upper bounds. We also establish upper bounds on the two-way assisted quantum and private capacities of the GADC. These bounds are based on the squashed entanglement, and they are established by constructing particular squashing channels. We compare these bounds with the max-Rains information bound, the mutual information bound, and another bound based on approximate covariance. For all capacities considered, we find that a large variety of techniques are useful in establishing bounds.

Joint work with Sumeet Khatri and Kunal Sharma

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom link: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/987676025

ISL Coffee Hour

Topic: 
Virtual Coffee Hour
Abstract / Description: 

Since ISL coffee hour cannot happen in person this quarter, let's try having a virtual coffee hour at 4pm on Thursdays. These will start with a student giving a 5 minute (hard limit!) lightning talk on their work or something else exciting, and then we'll just chat and hang out, with personal coffee and cookies. If you would like to speak, please send us an email.

We look forward to seeing you all there, 4pm, on Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/183002887

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom: stanford.zoom.us/j/183002887
Tags: 

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