EE Student Information

Graduate

Lab64: Halloween PCB Design Workshop

Topic: 
Halloween PCB Design Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

Halloween themed PCB DESIGN Workshop

This is a workshop where we provide the schematic and you provide the board SHAPE. We're talking pumpkins, ghosts, etc. Once we have your PCB shape in the layout software, we'll help you place the components, check for manufacturability, and send it out for fabrication! In a few days you'll have your very own custom PCB ready for assembly!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064 (Lab64)

Q-FARM welcomes Norman Yao, "Time Crystals in Open Systems"

Topic: 
Time Crystals in Open Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Periodically driven (Floquet) systems provide an intriguing landscape for studying novel phases of non-equilibrium matter. In this talk, I will describe recent advances, surrounding the idea of time translation symmetry breaking --- the resulting discrete time crystal exhibits collective subharmonic oscillations. Particular care will be taken to contextualize modern results on discrete time crystals with related phenomena in non-linear dynamical systems. The focus of the talk will be on showing that locally-interacting, Floquet Hamiltonian dynamics coupled to a Langevin bath support finite-temperature discrete time crystals with an infinite auto-correlation time. Our approach utilizes a general mapping from probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) to open classical Floquet systems. Applying this mapping to a variant of the Toom cellular automata leads to a 2D Floquet Hamiltonian with a finite-temperature period-doubling phase transition. Finally, I will discuss how general results from the field of probabilistic cellular automata imply the existence of discrete time crystals in all dimensions, d > 0.


Boxed lunches will be served at 11:15am - 12:00pm outdoors in the Varian courtyard. No food is allowed inside the seminar room. RSVP required.

 

Meeting ID: 914 8268 2357; Password available after registration.

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Physics & Astrophysics Building, Room 102/103 + Zoom

Probability Seminar: Hit and run algorithms and Mallows permutation models with L1 and L2 distances

Topic: 
Hit and run algorithms and Mallows permutation models with L1 and L2 distances
Abstract / Description: 

Introduced by Mallows in statistical ranking theory, Mallows permutation model is a class of non-uniform probability measures on the symmetric group that are biased towards the identity. The general model depends on a distance metric that can be chosen from a host of metrics on permutations. In this talk, I will focus on Mallows permutation models with L1 and L2 distances — respectively known as Spearman's footrule and Spearman's rank correlation in the statistics literature. The models have been widely applied in statistics and physics, but have mostly resisted analysis because the normalizing constants are "uncomputable". In the first part of the talk, I will explain how we can sample from both the L1 and L2 models using hit and run algorithms, which are a unifying class of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms that include the celebrated Swendsen–Wang algorithm. A natural question from probabilistic combinatorics is: pick a random permutation from either of the models, what does it "look like"? This may involve various features of the permutation, such as the band structure and the length of the longest increasing subsequence. In the second part of the talk, I will explain how multi-scale analysis and hit and run algorithms can be used to prove theorems regarding such questions.

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Sequoia 200

ISL Colloquium: Sequential Decision Making: How Much Adaptivity Is Needed Anyways?

Topic: 
Sequential Decision Making: How Much Adaptivity Is Needed Anyways?
Abstract / Description: 

Adaptive stochastic optimization under partial observability is one of the fundamental challenges in artificial intelligence and machine learning with a wide range of applications, including active learning, optimal experimental design, interactive recommendations, viral marketing, Wikipedia link prediction, and perception in robotics, to name a few. In such problems, one needs to adaptively make a sequence of decisions while taking into account the stochastic observations collected in previous rounds. For instance, in active learning, the goal is to learn a classifier by carefully requesting as few labels as possible from a set of unlabeled data points. Similarly, in experimental design, a practitioner may conduct a series of tests in order to reach a conclusion. Even though it is possible to determine all the selections ahead of time before any observations take place (e.g., select all the data points at once or conduct all the medical tests simultaneously), so-called a priori selection, it is more efficient to consider a fully adaptive procedure that exploits the information obtained from past selections in order to make a new selection. In this talk, we introduce semi-adaptive policies, for a wide range of decision-making problems, that enjoy the power of fully sequential procedures while performing exponentially fewer adaptive rounds.

 

Note: This talk will be held in person in Packard 101, and has been pushed back to 4:45pm to accommodate the new class schedule.

The talk will be streamed on Zoom for those who cannot attend (registration required).


This talk is hosted by the ISL Colloquium. To receive talk announcements, subscribe to the mailing list isl-colloq@lists.stanford.edu.


Please join us for a coffee half hour starting at 4:15pm at the Bytes outdoor tables outside of Packard.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 4:45pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SystemX Alliance presents "Digital Wireless in an Analog World"

Topic: 
Digital Wireless in an Analog World
Abstract / Description: 

With plenty of work left to do to realize the vision of 5G, global research community is already working on 6G. Visions of how this system will move us beyond the aggressive objectives of 5G are also accompanied by a list of significant technical challenges. And as 5G and 6G will drive mobile communications deeper into our societal fabric, the technology required spans not only all disciplines within electrical and computer engineering, but also disciplines like social psychology, cognitive and sensory function, and even political science. Coming from the perspective of what it takes to make tools to design and measure such systems, this talk will explore the breadth of opportunity for innovation and contribution.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018 + Zoom

Applied Physics/Physics colloquium present "Seeing to the Event Horizons of Supermassive Black Holes"

Topic: 
Seeing to the Event Horizons of Supermassive Black Holes
Abstract / Description: 

Supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies power some of the brightest objects we see in the Universe; active galactic nuclei (AGN). Much remains unknown, however, about exactly how energy is released from the material falling in through the accretion disk, and from the black hole itself, to power these extreme systems, form a luminous X-ray emitting corona, and launch jets at almost the speed of light.

The X-rays emitted from the corona illuminate the material falling into the black hole and by measuring its reflection, we obtain a unique insight into the processes occurring just outside the event horizon. Most recently, measuring the echoes of X-ray flares emitted by the corona, we have been able to obtain the most detailed map of the structure of the inner accretion disk and corona, and have been able to detect the reverberation of the X-ray flare from material that should classically be hidden behind the shadow of the black hole.

The reverberation of X-ray flares is letting us see the corona evolve in real time and witness the effects of strong gravity and general relativity as the X-rays are bent around the black hole. This gives us important insight into the small-scale processes close to the event horizon that allow black holes to power these extreme objects and play their important feedback role in the formation of structure in the Universe.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, September 28, 2021 - 4:30pm

Brown Institute for Media Innovation virtual reception

Topic: 
2020-21 Magic Grant program reception
Abstract / Description: 

Maneesh Agrawala and Mark Hansen cordially invite you to the 2021 Magic Grant Showcase, highlighting projects from the Brown Institute for Media Innovation!

The event features a unique mix of journalists and technologists, all funded through the 2020-21 Magic Grant program. The projects this year are incredibly strong.

* One team has built an audio storytelling platform that uses geolocation to connect participants to stories of people, places, and things that they walk by.
* Another has assembled a repository of email chains from officials in local and state governments, capturing how they addressed the COVID-19 pandemic - this database has led to almost 100 publications.
* One Magic Grant has built high-level abstractions for understanding and describing sports videos, specifically providing a better viewing experience for tennis matches and powerful game analysis for the athletes.
* And still another group examined the economic consequences of COVID-19, focusing on Atlanta.


From examining the media's role in the mass incarceration movement in the US to a new tool to support online deliberation the 2020-2021 Magic Grants are a great mix of journalism and technology. Read about our 2020-2021 cohort of projects presenting at the showcase event.

We hope you can join us! RSVP required

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 14, 2021 - 4:00pm

SCIEN and EE292E presents "Entrepreneurship, AI, and Agriculture: How ML is Changing Industries"

Topic: 
Entrepreneurship, AI, and Agriculture: How ML is Changing Industries
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, Lee will go through 3 parts:

  1. His entrepreneurship journey and the formation of Blue River Technology from a class at Stanford to an idea worth working on, to a company operating on 10% of the lettuce in the US.
  2. The computer vision technology and journey behind the see and spray system up until acquisition
  3. Advances in control systems
Date and Time: 
Wednesday, September 29, 2021 - 4:30pm

EE Degree Progress Officer - open office hours

Topic: 
Degree Progress Office Hours
Abstract / Description: 

This is a reminder that I am holding office hours on Monday and Wednesday during the first 2 weeks of class.

If you have any questions or have difficulties in course registration, please feel free to meet me virtually via the Zoom link below - password required.

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 27, 2021 - 11:00am to 12:00pm

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Graduate