EE Student Information

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 EE Student Information, Spring & Summer Quarters 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

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Graduate

Seminar in Condensed Matter Physics presents "Symmetry and topology of quasiparticles and their bound states in correlated insulators"

Topic: 
Symmetry and topology of quasiparticles and their bound states in correlated insulators
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, I explore two examples of how the symmetry of a microscopic lattice or topology of an underlying non-interacting band structure can be imprinted in the excitations of strongly-correlated insulators. First, I show that previously-unnoticed crystal symmetry constraints drastically alter the understanding of Ising quantum criticality in the quasi-1D magnetic insulator CoNb2O6, resolving decade-old puzzles related to the dispersion of confined 'kinks' in the ordered phase and the decay of spin-flip quasiparticles in the paramagnetic phase [1]. Turning next to the correlated quantum anomalous Hall insulator recently observed in twisted bilayer graphene near the magic angle, I show that this state supports stable, weakly-dispersing flat bands of neutral bosonic excitons with substantial Berry curvature [2], and argue that these can under certain conditions form a new hierarchy of bosonic fractional quantum Hall liquids [3].

References:
[1] M. Fava, R. Coldea, and S.A. Parameswaran, arXiv:2004.04169 (2020).
[2] Y.H. Kwan, Y. Hu, S.H. Simon, and S.A. Parameswaran, arXiv:2003.11560 (2020).
[3] Y.H. Kwan, Y. Hu, S.H. Simon, and S.A. Parameswaran, arXiv:2003.11559 (2020).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 7, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom (email vkhemani for link)

SystemX presents "Consciousness"

Topic: 
Consciousness
Abstract / Description: 

No question in cognitive science is more challenging, or more fascinating, than the nature of consciousness. Until recently, the study of consciousness was usually considered a matter for philosophy rather than science, but there has been an explosion in the past decade of theories and experiments concerning how consciousness works. This talk will examine the nature of human consciousness from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science. It will cover topics from the philosophy of mind, cognitive linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, and whether it may ever be possible for computers to be conscious, a topic studied in artificial intelligence.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 7, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: stanford.zoom.us/j/865305030

Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics presents "Void formation in operator growth, quantum chaos and black hole evaporation"

Topic: 
Void formation in operator growth, quantum chaos and black hole evaporation
Abstract / Description: 

I first introduce the concept of void formation in Heisenberg evolution of operators and provide support that it can be used to distinguish chaotic and integrable systems.

After a brief discussion of applications of void formation to entanglement growths and generation of multi-partite entanglement, I will explain how it can provide insights into evolution of black holes by considering some simple quantum mechanical toy models of black hole evaporation.

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 4, 2020 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom id: 165-492-015

Digital Memcomputing Webinar presents Digital Memcomputing: from logic to dynamics to topology

Topic: 
Digital Memcomputing: from logic to dynamics to topology
Abstract / Description: 

Memcomputing is a novel physics-based approach to computation that employs memory to both process and store information on the same physical location. Its digital version is designed to solve combinatorial optimization problems. A practical realization of digital memcomputing machines (DMMs) can be accomplished via circuits of non-linear, pointdissipative dynamical systems engineered so that periodic orbits and chaos can be avoided. A given logic problem is first mapped into this type of dynamical system whose point attractors represent the solutions of the original problem. A DMM then finds the solution via a succession of elementary instantons whose role is to eliminate solitonic configurations of logical inconsistency (??logical defects??) from the circuit. I will discuss the Physics behind memcomputing and show many examples of its applicability to various combinatorial optimization problems demonstrating its advantages over traditional approaches. Work supported in part by DARPA, MemComputing, Inc. (http://memcpu.com/), and CMRR.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 - 5:00pm
Venue: 
zoom link : https://stanford.zoom.us/j/7457272659

SystemX presents "Versal-ACAP Architecture, Programming, Machine Learning and 5G"

Topic: 
Versal-ACAP Architecture, Programming, Machine Learning and 5G
Abstract / Description: 

This presentation will provide an overview of one of the new generation of 7nm devices from Xilinx, the Versal ACAP multi-core vector processor. The overall device architecture together with a detailed description of the Vector processor datapath will be presented. The programming model for the device will be described along with some application use cases for machine learning inference and 4G/5G wireless radio will be covered.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 30, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Smart Grid Seminar presents "California Microgrids: Lessons Learned"

Topic: 
California Microgrids: Lessons Learned
Abstract / Description: 

There has been substantial discussion of the use of microgrids as a result of the recent wildfires and Public Safety Power Shutoffs. The ability of microgrids to be considered for these applications now, is in part a result of over a decade of research funded through the California Energy Commission's R&D programs. To date the CEC has issued over $100M in grants that have funded over 30 microgrids. These microgrids support a variety of applications, with a diversity of ownership models. This presentation will provide an overview of the microgrid research being funded by the CEC and future research areas of interest.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 23, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Smart Grid Seminar presents "Grid Resilience"

Topic: 
Grid Resilience
Abstract / Description: 

The term "resilience" refers to the ability to prepare for and adapt to changing conditions and withstand and recover rapidly from disruptions. The value of resilience to the electricity system is in enabling the function of other interdependent infrastructure systems and maintaining critical energy-based services. Many resilience approaches are being considered. This webinar will outline some of these perspectives and provide an overview of some of the related ongoing activities within the Department of Energy.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 21, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Smart Grid Seminar presents "Cyber Security Roadmap and Challenge"

Topic: 
Cyber Security Roadmap and Challenge
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber security has become a critical priority for electric utilities, which are increasingly dependent on information technology and telecommunication infrastructure to ensure the reliability and security of the electric grid. Additionally, rapid, disruptive changes are happening in electric grids around the world. In many states and countries, initiatives are underway to integrate small, renewable generation into the distribution grid, to meet the local demand for electricity, while reducing the dependency on large, central generation facilities and long-distance transmission. This transition requires new technologies, connectivity, and intelligence, which inherently changes the attack surface of the grid and introduces new stakeholders in the delivery and use of power. This talk provides an introduction to these new cyber security issues, discusses EPRI's approach to addressing the challenges, and presents future research opportunities.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Smart Grid Seminar presents "Dynamic Electricity Pricing"

Topic: 
Dynamic Electricity Pricing
Abstract / Description: 

With the rapid growth in residential smart meters across the United States in recent years, most homes will soon be capable of moving to time varying prices for electricity. We discuss a methodology for studying the welfare impacts of different pricing strategies on an electricity market when homes deploy smart, price responsive appliances with forward-looking capabilities, and understanding its effects on social welfare and consumer surplus. We show conditions under which asymptotically, as the number of homes increases, social welfare-maximizing price schedules in equilibrium are linear in load. Real data are used to calibrate a smart thermostat model to compare dynamic pricing strategy against flat and peak pricing strategies when smart thermostats are deployed across ComEd's service territory of 3.5 million residential homes.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom: register to receive ID

Probability Seminar presents "Speeding up Markov chains with deterministic jumps"

Topic: 
Speeding up Markov chains with deterministic jumps
Abstract / Description: 

A striking example of the phenomenon: Consider simple random walk on the integers mod n [X(k+1)] = X(k) + epsilon(k+1)(mod n) where epsilon takes values {0,1,-1} with probability 1/3 each. This walk takes order n2 steps to get random. Now make a slight modification: X(k+1) = 2X(k) + epsilon(k+1) (mod n). This has the same amount of randomness BUT, for almost all n, the walk gets random in order log(n) steps.

In joint work with Sourav Chatterjee we show this as quite a general phenomenon. For any doubly stochastic Markov chain on n states and any permutation f(x) on the state space, the walk that goes from x to f(x) to y, where y is one step of the chain, mixes in order log (n) states for almost all permutations f. Since it happens for most f, this raises the problem of finding specific f for real problems. Some progress will be reported.

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 27, 2020 - 4:00pm

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