EE Student Information

Graduate

SCIEN welcomes Prof Michelle Digman

Topic: 
Metabolic imaging using the phasor approach to FLIM and tracking phenotypic change in mitochondria in cancer cells with Mitometer
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk I will discuss the phasor approach technique in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) as a novel method to measure metabolic alteration as a function of extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics. To measure mitochondria contribution to metabolic switching, we developed a new algorithm called "mitometer" that is unbiased and allows for automated segmentation and tracking of mitochondria in live cell 2D and 3D time-lapse images. I will show how Mitometer measures mitochondria of triple-negative breast cancer cells. Results show they are faster, more directional, and more elongated than those in their receptor-positive counterparts. Furthermore, Mitometer shows that mitochondrial motility and morphology in breast cancer, but not in normal breast epithelia, correlate with fractions of the reduced form of NADH. Together, the automated segmentation and tracking algorithms and the innate user interface make Mitometer a broadly accessible tool.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 20, 2021 - 4:30pm

SCIEN presents "Polarized Computational Imaging and Beyond"

Topic: 
Polarized Computational Imaging and Beyond
Abstract / Description: 

Is computational imaging the next frontier in computer vision? As materials, lighting, and geometry become more complex an ordinary camera starts to be the limiting step in the vision pipeline. A case in point are transparent objects which cannot be seen by an ordinary camera (which mimics the human eye). However, a plenoptic camera that captures polarization spawns a unique texture to previously invisible objects. The polarized texture results from complex light-matter interactions in shape and refractive index. Such texture can be subsequently modeled and “baked” into neural pipelines to enable inference on transparent objects, a decades-open task in traditional computer vision. WIth polarization simply scratching the surface of what computational imaging can do, we end with a discussion of how broader forms of plenoptic data can be leveraged in future neural pipelines.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 13, 2021 - 4:30pm

ISL Colloquium: KO codes: Inventing Non-linear Encoding and Decoding for Reliable Wireless Communication via Deep-learning

Topic: 
KO codes: Inventing Non-linear Encoding and Decoding for Reliable Wireless Communication via Deep-learning
Abstract / Description: 

Landmark codes underpin reliable physical layer communication, e.g., Reed-Muller, BCH, Convolution, Turbo, LDPC and Polar codes: each is a linear code and represents a mathematical breakthrough. The impact on humanity is huge: each of these codes has been used in global wireless communication standards (satellite, WiFi, cellular). Traditionally, the design of codes has been driven by human-ingenuity and hence the progress is sporadic. Can we automate and accelerate this process of discovering codes?

In this talk, I will talk about KO codes, a new family of computationally efficient deep-learning driven codes that outperform the state-of-the-art reliability performance on the standardized AWGN channel. KO codes beat state-of-the-art Reed-Muller and Polar codes, under the low-complexity successive cancellation decoding, in the challenging short-to-medium block length regime on the AWGN channel. We show that the gains of KO codes are primarily due to the nonlinear mapping of information bits directly to transmit real symbols (bypassing modulation) and yet possess an efficient, high performance decoder. The key technical innovation that renders this possible is design of a novel family of neural architectures inspired by the computation tree of the Kronecker Operation (KO) central to Reed-Muller and Polar codes. These architectures pave way for the discovery of a much richer class of hitherto unexplored nonlinear algebraic structures. And more interestingly, despite having a lot of encoding and decoding structure, KO codes exhibit striking similarity to random Gaussian codes!


To avoid Zoom-bombing, we ask attendees to sign in via the above URL to receive the Zoom meeting details by email.

Please join us for a coffee half hour starting at 3:30pm at the Grove outside Packard.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 101 + Zoom (registration req'd)

SystemX Alliance presents "Scaling photonic quantum computers"

Topic: 
Scaling photonic quantum computers
Abstract / Description: 

Photonics is emerging as one of the leading contenders for building useful quantum computers. I will discuss our recent efforts in building and cloud-deploying photonic quantum computing devices, and our roadmap for scaling up and achieving fault tolerance.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018 + Zoom

Applied Physics/Physics colloquium: Weaving together theoretical physics, machine learning and neuroscience: a tale of neurons, atoms and photons in the service of computation

Topic: 
Weaving together theoretical physics, machine learning and neuroscience: a tale of neurons, atoms and photons in the service of computation
Abstract / Description: 

We are witnessing an exciting interplay between physics, computation and neurobiology that spans in multiple directions. In one direction we can use the power of complex systems analysis, developed in theoretical physics and applied mathematics, to elucidate design principles governing how neural networks, both biological and artificial, can learn and function. In another direction, we can exploit novel physics to instantiate and analyze new kinds of quantum neuromorphic computers built using atomic spins and photons. We will give several vignettes in both directions, including: (1) deriving the detailed structure of the primate retina from first principles by developing optimal neural networks for processing natural movies, (2) using dynamic mean field theory to understand and optimize the training of deep neural networks used in machine learning, (3) understanding the geometry and dynamics of high dimensional optimization in the classical limit of a dissipative many-body quantum optimizer comprised of interacting photons.

References:
Y. Bahri, J. Kadmon, J. Pennington, S. Schoenholz, J. Sohl-Dickstein, and S. Ganguli, Statistical mechanics of deep learning, Annual Reviews of Condensed Matter Physics, 2020.
M. Advani, S. Lahiri and S. Ganguli, Statistical mechanics of complex neural systems and high dimensional data, Journal of Statistical Mechanics Theory and Experiment (2013), P03014.
S. Deny, J. Lindsey, S. Ganguli, S. Ocko, The emergence of multiple retinal cell types through efficient coding of natural movies, Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS) 2018.
B. Poole, S. Lahiri, M. Raghu, J. Sohl-Dickstein, and S. Ganguli, Exponential expressivity in deep neural networks through transient chaos, Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) 2016.
J. Pennington, S. Schloenholz, and S. Ganguli, Resurrecting the sigmoid in deep learning through dynamical isometry: theory and practice, Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) 2017.
Y. Yamamoto, T. Leleu, S. Ganguli and H. Mabuchi, Coherent Ising Machines: quantum optics and neural network perspectives, Applied Physics Letters 2020.
B.P. Marsh, Y, Guo, R.M. Kroeze, S. Gopalakrishnan, S. Ganguli, J. Keeling, B.L. Lev, Enhancing associative memory recall and storage capacity using confocal cavity QED, Physical Review X, 2020.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 4:30pm

SystemX Alliance presents "Aluminum Scandium Nitride Microdevices for Next Generation Nonvolatile Memory and Microelectromechanical Systems"

Topic: 
Aluminum Scandium Nitride Microdevices for Next Generation Nonvolatile Memory and Microelectromechanical Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Aluminum Nitride (AlN) is a well-established thin film piezoelectric material. AlN bulk acoustic wave (BAW) radio frequency (RF) filters were one of the key innovations that enabled the 3G and 4G smart phone revolution. Recently, the substitutional doping of scandium (Sc) for aluminum (Al) to form aluminum scandium nitride (AlScN) has been studied to significantly enhance the piezoelectric properties and to introduce ferroelectric properties into AlN based material systems. The properties achieved have profound implications for the performance of future 5G and 6G RF filters, piezoelectric sensors, piezoelectric energy harvesters, and for scaling the bit density of ferroelectric nonvolatile memories. This talk will present on the synthesis of highly Sc doped AlScN materials of the thickness and quality needed for applications in memory and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The material properties achieved will be reported and placed in the context of device specific figures-of-merit and competing material systems. Ferroelectric and electromechanical devices that utilize the unique properties of AlScN to achieve state-of-the-art (SOA) performance will be shown.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 2:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 202 + Zoom

SCIEN Colloquium and EE 292E presents "Human vision at a glance"

Topic: 
Human vision at a glance
Abstract / Description: 

Recent advances in human vision research have pointed toward a theory that unifies many aspects of vision that are relevant to applications. According to this theory, loss of information in peripheral vision determines performance on many visual tasks. This theory subsumes old concepts such as visual saliency, selective attention, and change blindness. It predicts the rich details we have access to at a glance. Furthermore, it provides insight into tasks not commonly studied in human vision, such as the ability to comprehend connections in a graph, or to compare information across space.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 6, 2021 - 4:30pm

lab64's Winter Break PCB Assembly Party

Topic: 
Winter Break PCB Assembly Party
Abstract / Description: 

This is one of lab64's traditional build-a-board workshops. Custom boards are welcome but *not* required; we'll have some cute kits to build so everyone leaves with a super-excellent holiday gizmo!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064 (lab64)

Lab64's Winter Holiday PCB Design Workshop

Topic: 
Winter Holiday PCB Design Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

Winter Holiday PCB Design Workshop 

... snowflakes, snowpeople, reindeer, gingerbread house shapes... anything you can imagine!

 

This is a workshop where we provide the schematic and you provide the board SHAPE. Once we have your PCB shape in the layout software, we'll help you place the components, check for manufacturability, and send it out for fabrication! In a few days you'll have your very own custom PCB ready for assembly!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064 (lab64)

Lab64: Halloween PCB Assembly Party

Topic: 
Halloween PCB Assembly Party
Abstract / Description: 

Halloween Soldering / PCB Assembly Workshop

This is one of lab64's traditional build-a-board workshops. Custom boards are welcome but *not* required; we'll have some cute kits to build so everyone leaves with a super-excellent Halloween gizmo!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 27, 2021 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064 (Lab64)

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Graduate