Graduate

SmartGrid Seminar welcomes Saurabh Amin

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The seminars are scheduled for 1:30 pm on the dates listed above. The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions
to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.


Yours sincerely,

Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Optimization, Inference and Learning for District-Energy Systems

Topic: 
Optimization, Inference and Learning for District-Energy Systems
Abstract / Description: 

We discuss how Optimization, Inference and Learning (OIL) methodology is expected to re-shape future demand-response technologies acting across interdependent energy, i.e. power, natural gas andheating/cooling, infrastructures at the district/metropolitan/distribution level. We describe hierarchy ofdeterministic and stochastic planning and operational problems emerging in the context of physical flows over networks associated with the laws of electricity, gas-, fluid- and heat-mechanics. We proceed to illustratedevelopment and challenges of the physics-informed OIL methodology on examples of: a) Graphical Models approach applied to a broad spectrum of the energy flow problems, including online reconstruction of the grid(s) topology from measurements; b) Direct and inverse dynamical problems for timely delivery of services in the district heating/cooling systems; c) Ensemble Control of the phase-space cycling energy loads via Markov Decision Process (MDP) and related reinforcement learning approaches.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Emerging Technologies and Their Impact on the Grid

Topic: 
Emerging Technologies and Their Impact on the Grid
Abstract / Description: 

As rooftop solar, electric vehicles, and residential battery storage continue to become more and more commonplace, they can have significant impacts in the way the Energy Grid operates. By embracing these new technologies, PG&E is helping to create a vision for what a next generation energy company will look like and seeking to answer key questions such as: Is energy storage changing the way in which utilities operate the grid? What is needed for new technologies, such as residential battery energy storage, to go mainstream? What are some of the key factors driving the inevitable transition from a one-way grid to a two-way grid?

This presentation will focus on both the technology changes happening to the energy space as well as some of the technology advancements helping to reshape how the energy grid engages with these changes. It will cover these topics while exploring a case study of a recent pilot projects where PG&E, Tesla, GE & Green Charge teamed up on a project in San Jose to demonstrate how battery storage and rooftop solar connected to smart inverters can be used to support the electric grid during periods of high demand while providing participating residents and businesses with backup power and bill reduction. The project is a microcosm of what the grid will look like in the near future with the rapid adoption of distributed energy resources such as solar, battery storage & EVs.


 

The seminars are scheduled for 1:30 pm on the dates listed above. The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions
to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

 

Yours sincerely,


Smart Grid Seminar Organization Team,

Ram Rajagopal, Assistant Professor, Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Electrical Engineering
Chin-Woo Tan, Director, Stanford Smart Grid Lab
Yuting Ji, Postdoctoral Scholar, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Emre Kara, Associate Staff Scientist, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SCIEN Talk: Mapping molecular orientation using polarized light microscopy

Topic: 
Mapping molecular orientation using polarized light microscopy
Abstract / Description: 

Polarization is a basic property of light, but the human eye is not sensitive to it. Therefore, we don't have an intuitive understanding of polarization and of optical phenomena that are based on it. They either elude us, like the polarization of the blue sky or the rainbow, or they puzzle us, like the effect of Polaroid sunglasses. Meanwhile, polarized light plays an important role in nature and can be used to manipulate and analyze molecular order in materials, including living cells, tissues, and whole organisms, by observation with the polarized light microscope.

In this seminar, Rudolf Oldenbourg will first illustrate the nature of polarized light and its interaction with aligned materials using hands-on demonstrations. He will then introduce a modern version of the polarized light microscope, the LC-PolScope, created at the MBL. Enhanced by liquid crystal devices, electronic imaging, and digital image processing techniques, the LC-PolScope reveals and measures the orientation of molecules in every resolved specimen point at once. In recent years, his lab expanded the LC-PolScope technique to include the measurement of polarized fluorescence of GFP and other fluorescent molecules, and applied it to record the remarkable choreography of septin proteins during cell division, displayed in yeast to mammalian cells.

Talon Chandler will then discuss extending polarized light techniques to multi-view microscopes, including light sheet and light field microscopes. In contrast to traditional, single-view microscopy, the recording of specimen images along two or more viewing directions allows us to unambiguously measure the three dimensional orientation of molecules and their aggregates. Chandler will discuss ongoing work on optimizing the design and reconstruction algorithms for multi-view polarized light microscopy.


The SCIEN Colloquia are open to the public. The talks are also videotaped and posted the following week on talks.stanford.edu.

There will a reception following the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SystemX Seminar: Efficient Machine Learning Hardware Design: From High-Throughput Computer Vision to Ultra-Low-Power Biomedical Applications

Topic: 
Efficient Machine Learning Hardware Design: From High-Throughput Computer Vision to Ultra-Low-Power Biomedical Applications
Abstract / Description: 

In recent years, deep learning algorithms have been widespread across many practical applications. Algorithms trained by offline back propagation using pre-defined datasets show impressive performance, but state-of-the-art algorithms are compute-/memory-intensive, making it difficult to perform low-power real-time classification, especially on area-/power-constrained embedded hardware platforms.

In this talk, we present our recent research on how hardware designs of machine learning algorithms are efficiently customized for two divergent applications. These include deep convolutional neural networks (VGG, ResNet) for high-throughput image/video applications (e.g. autonomous driving), and compressed neural networks for ECG-based ultra-low-power biomedical applications (e.g. wearable devices). Our FPGA and ASIC prototype designs are presented that improve the energy-efficiency by optimizing computation, memory, and communication for representative neural networks.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018

VR/AR Community presents 'Privacy and VR'

Topic: 
Privacy and VR
Abstract / Description: 

With widespread adoption of VR, what data could we collect about users, and what can we then extrapolate from that data? Where's the line between reasonable and unreasonable knowledge? This talk will cover potential risks and concerns about Privacy and VR and offer suggestions for developers and users.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 16, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

VR/AR Community presents 'Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences'

Topic: 
Designing Multi-Person Immersive Experiences
Abstract / Description: 

Immersive interfaces have the potential to enable powerful human-to-human interactions by creating shared spaces. Learn best practices for designing VR and AR experiences around communal interactions to enable collaboration, communication and co-presence. By also considering asymmetric experiences that take place across heterogeneous devices like a headset and a mobile phone, designers can open up new opportunities for participation. Mechanics built around asynchronous interactions can make small communities feel bigger.

This session will discuss findings from dozens of social interaction tests and highlight best practices towards designing fantastic multi-person immersive experiences.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 7:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 103

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 12, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

lab64 - open lab / office hours

Topic: 
Office Hours - get help with projects
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Tutorials and instructional office hours will be held during Fall quarter for students who are interested in XR but don't have much experience. There will be weekly office hours (Sundays 5 - 6 p.m., lab64) with an experienced core member who will help with weekly assignments starting week 3. The content covered, courtesy of Udacity, is listed below:

Introduction to Virtual Reality
VR Scenes and Objects
VR Software Development

​The pacing of the content will be about 2-3 hours per week. The timeline for these unofficial assignments are listed below.

By week 3: Finish Introduction to Virtual Reality
By week 4: Finish Animations in Scenes and Objects
By week 5: Finish Scenes and Objects
By week 6: Finish Controlling Objects Using Code in Software Development
By week 7: Finish Programming Animations in Software Development
By week 8: Finish Software Development

Basic programming experience is highly recommended. An experience level of having completed CS 106A will suffice for most of the topics covered, and an experience level of having completed CS 106B/X is ideal

Date and Time: 
Sunday, November 5, 2017 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 064

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