Graduate

SystemX Seminar: Brain-machine Interfaces: From basic science and engineering to clinical trials

Topic: 
Brain-machine Interfaces: From basic science and engineering to clinical trials
Abstract / Description: 

Millions of people worldwide suffer from neurological disease and injury leading to paralysis, which is often so severe that people are unable to feed themselves or communicate. Cortically-controlled brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to restore some of this lost function by converting neural activity from the brain into control signals for prosthetic devices. I will describe some of our group's recent investigations into basic motor neurophysiology focused on understanding neural population dynamics, pre-clinical BMIs focused on high-performance control algorithm design, and translational BMI development and pilot clinical trial results focused on helping establish clinical viability.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SystemX Seminar: Design verification for unsupervised learning systems

Topic: 
Design verification for unsupervised learning systems
Abstract / Description: 

The deployment of artificial intelligence (AI), particularly of systems that learn from data and experience, is rapidly expanding in our society. Verified artificial intelligence (AI) is the goal of designing AI-based systems that have strong, verified assurances of correctness with respect to mathematically-specified requirements. In this talk, I will consider Verified AI from a formal methods perspective. I will describe five challenges for achieving Verified AI, and five corresponding principles for addressing these challenges. I will illustrate these challenges and principles with examples and sample results from the domain of intelligent cyber-physical systems, with a particular focus on autonomous vehicles.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SystemX Seminar: On the role of interaction in future mobility systems, from vehicle-centric to system-wide control

Topic: 
On the role of interaction in future mobility systems, from vehicle-centric to system-wide control
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk I will discuss my work on self-driving vehicles, with an emphasis on accounting for interactions with external counterparts at both the vehicle- and system-levels. Specifically, I will first discuss a decision-making framework that enables a self-driving vehicle to proactively interact with humans to infer their intents, and to use such information for safe and efficient driving. I will then turn the discussion to the operational and economic aspects of autonomous mobility-on-demand (AMoD) systems, with an emphasis on the interaction between AMoD and the electric power network.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SystemX Seminar: Power Electronics for the Future: Research Trends and Challenges

Topic: 
Power Electronics for the Future: Research Trends and Challenges
Abstract / Description: 

Power electronics can be found in everything from cellphones and laptops to gasoline/electric vehicles, industrial motors and inverters that connect solar panels to the electric grid. With close to 80% of electrical energy consumption in the US expected to flow through a power converter by 2030, innovative solutions are required to tackle key issues related to conversion efficiency, power density and cost. This talk will look at the trends in power electronics across different application spaces, describe the ongoing research efforts and highlight the challenges ahead.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 19, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SystemX Seminar: Computational Near-Eye Displays (for VR/AR Applications)

Topic: 
Computational Near-Eye Displays (for VR/AR Applications)
Abstract / Description: 

Immersive visual and experiential computing systems, i.e. virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR), are entering the consumer market and have the potential to profoundly impact our society. Applications of these systems range from communication, entertainment, education, collaborative work, simulation and training to telesurgery, phobia treatment, and basic vision research. In every immersive experience, the primary interface between the user and the digital world is the near-eye display. Thus, developing near-eye display systems that provide a high-quality user experience is of the utmost importance. Many characteristics of near-eye displays that define the quality of an experience, such as resolution, refresh rate, contrast, and field of view, have been significantly improved over the last years. However, a significant source of visual discomfort prevails: the vergence-accommodation conflict (VAC). Further, natural focus cues are not supported by any existing near-eye display. In this talk, we discuss frontiers of engineering next-generation opto-computational near-eye display systems to increase visual comfort and provide realistic and effective visual experiences.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Three principles of data science: predictability, stability, and computability

Topic: 
Three principles of data science: predictability, stability, and computability
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, I'd like to discuss the intertwining importance and connections of three principles of data science in the title.

They will be demonstrated in the context of two collaborative projects in neuroscience and genomics, respectively. The first project in neuroscience uses transfer learning to integrate fitted convolutional neural networks (CNNs) on ImageNet with regression methods to provide predictive and stable characterizations of neurons from the challenging primary visual cortex V4. The second project proposes iterative random forests (iRF) as a stablized RF to seek predictable and interpretable high-order interactions among biomolecules.


 

Lunch is provided and will be served at 12:45 pm.
Please RSVP here by Friday, April 13

Organizers: Guido Imbens, Susan Athey, Mohsen Bayati, and Stefan Wager
Sponsored by: Institute for Research in the Social Sciences and Graduate School of Business

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 16, 2018 - 1:10pm

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Reverse Engineering the Universe

Topic: 
Reverse Engineering the Universe
Abstract / Description: 

Prof. Andrei Linde of the Stanford Physics Department will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium on Tues., May 8, 2018 entitled "Reverse Engineering the Universe."

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Demonology: The Curious Role of Intelligence in Physics & Biology

Topic: 
Demonology: The Curious Role of Intelligence in Physics & Biology
Abstract / Description: 

For the lion's share of its history, physics analyzed the inanimate world. Or, that is the view it has of itself. Careful reflection, though, shows that physics regularly invoked an expressly extra-physical agency—intelligence—in its efforts to understand even the most basic physical phenomena. I will survey this curious proclivity, noting that similar appeals to intelligent "demons" go back to Laplace's theory of chance, Poincaré's discovery of deterministic chaos in the solar system, and Darwin's explanation of the origin of biological organisms in terms of natural selection. Today, we are on the verge of a new physics of information that will transform this bad "demonology" to a constructive, perhaps even an engineering, paradigm that explains information processing embedded in the natural world. In the process I will show how deterministic chaos arises in the operation of Maxwell's Demon and outline nanoscale experimental implementations ongoing at Caltech's Kavli Nanoscience Institute.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Top Quarks: The New Flavor

Topic: 
Top Quarks: The New Flavor
Abstract / Description: 

The Large Hadron Collider is providing an enormous dataset of proton-proton collisions at the highest energies ever achieved in a laboratory.

With our new ability to study the Higgs boson and the unprecedentedly large sample of top quarks, a new frontier has opened: the flavor physics of the top quark - at heart, the question of how the top quark interacts with the Higgs field. We can start to ask questions such as whether the Higgs field is the unique source of the top quark's mass and whether there are unexpected interactions between the top quark and the Higgs boson. The answers to these questions will shed light on what may lie beyond the particle physics Standard Model and have cosmological implications.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 10, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

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