EE Student Information

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 EE Student Information, Spring & Summer Quarters 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

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Graduate

Q-FARM presents "Many-body invariants from statistical correlations of randomized measurements"

Topic: 
Many-body invariants from statistical correlations of randomized measurements
Abstract / Description: 

With the advances of quantum simulators in implementing various quantum many-body states, it is important to find efficient ways to characterize and measure many-body states, without resorting to full quantum state tomography. Specifically, in contrast to electronic materials, where the measurements are mainly within the linear-response paradigm, quantum simulators offer unique access to the full wave function that inspires novel probing approaches. In this talk, I discuss how various quantities, such as entanglement spectrum, symmetry-protected topological invariants, and fractional many-body Chern number could be extracted. In the latter case, we show how such an invariant can be measured, using a single wave function, without the knowledge of the Hamiltonian. This should be contrasted to the conventional way, where on requires a family of many-body wave functions parameterized by twist angles in order to calculate the Berry curvature.

Science Advance 6, 3666 (2020)
arxiv 2005.13543
arxiv 2005.13677

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 987 676 025

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Coming Attractions: Death or Utopia in the Next Three Decades"

Topic: 
Coming Attractions: Death or Utopia in the Next Three Decades
Abstract / Description: 

Today the data suggests that we are near the beginning of a chaotic mess of global proportions. Things are fairly simple: a global pandemic with no tools to fight the virus. a global economy in disarray, climate change and other existential risks beginning to intrude into our daily lives, and a total lack of a plan as to what to do. On the other hand, we are at the pinnacle of human capabilities and have, if we choose to do so, the capability create a Utopian egalitarian world without conflict or want.

In this two hour program a group of experts will explore the future, focusing on 2030 and 2050. Where are we now? What is trending? What if anything can be done about it?


Sponsors: The invitational Asilomar Microcomputer Workshop is one of the iconic gatherings which supported the growth of computing. This is the first mini-conference which replaces the 46th Asilomar Microcomputer Workshop which was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. www.amw.org.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:00am
Venue: 
REGISTER to receive access

Student / Faculty Roundtable Discussion

Topic: 
Lunch and AMA conversation
Abstract / Description: 

These informal & informational lunches consist of several students and faculty. There is no set agenda during the discussion and it is completely informal. Students are encouraged to share their experience within the department, research, their plans, and feedback. 

Registration is required.

Sign up as soon as you can because the roundtable discussion session is very popular and fills up quickly! Space is limited; you will receive a confirmation email if you are confirmed to attend. Please contact Tiffany, Student Life Coordinator if you have any questions, tdtran@stanford.edu. Thank you!

The student/faculty roundtable discussions are organized by the Student Life Committee.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Statistics Department Seminar presents "A Bayesian approach to contamination removal in molecular microbial studies"

Topic: 
A Bayesian approach to contamination removal in molecular microbial studies
Abstract / Description: 

High-throughput sequencing (HTS) allows the quantification of non-culturable microbial organisms in human health and disease states, including infectious diseases. However, contaminating nucleic acids (DNA) from external sources may lead to misidentification of a taxon's provenance. Sequencing controls can help to identify most of these contaminants through the use of statistical mixture models. We propose a Bayesian reference analysis based on a hierarchical model for the observed data, that infers the true intensities of a specimen's microbial DNA in the presence of microbial DNA contamination. By using the partial information about contamination intensities available in negative controls, we define a marginal likelihood and reference prior for the true intensities. Then, we obtain a marginal posterior distribution for the true intensities.

In this talk, I will present the performance of the contamination removal method in the dilution series of the standard ZymoBIOMICS microbial community. I will also demonstrate our approach on two different low-biomass plasma specimens datasets. Our method is available as an open-source R package on Github. In addition, to identify contaminant sources, we provide a topic modeling approach to infer contaminant topics.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, June 2, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID 935 0733 5349 (locks at 4:40pm PST)

Probability Seminar presents "Shuffling ancestries"

Topic: 
Shuffling ancestries
Abstract / Description: 

Ranked tree shapes and ranked genealogies are binary tree structures commonly used in biological areas. These trees are used to model the ancestral history of a sample, typically a sample of DNA or RNA sequences. We will discuss two representations of ranked tree shapes as constrained matrices of integers and ordered matchings. We exploit these representations to define an ergodic Markov chain on the space of ranked tree shapes with uniform stationary distribution. We will study its mixing time and compare to other related work.

This is based on joint work with Mackenzie Simper.

Date and Time: 
Monday, June 15, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Probability Seminar welcomes Yuriy Nemish

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

We consider general self-adjoint rational functions in several independent random matrices whose entries are centered and have constant variance. Under some numerically checkable conditions, we establish for these models the optimal local law, i.e., we show that the empirical spectral distribution on scales just above the eigenvalue spacing follows the global density of states which is determined by free probability theory. Moreover, in the framework of the developed theory, we study the density of transmission eigenvalues in the random matrix model for transport in quantum dots coupled to a chaotic environment.

This is a joint work with Laszlo Erdös and Torben Krüger.

Date and Time: 
Monday, June 8, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom

Probability Seminar presents "Optimal delocalization for generalized Wigner matrices"

Topic: 
Optimal delocalization for generalized Wigner matrices
Abstract / Description: 

We consider eigenvector statistics of large random matrices. When the matrix entries are sampled from independent Gaussian random variables, eigenvectors are uniformly distributed on the sphere and numerous properties can be computed exactly. In particular, it can be shown that extremal coordinates are no larger than $C\sqrt{\log N/N}$ with high probability.

There has been an extensive amount of work on generalizing such a result, known as delocalization, to a more general entry distribution. After giving a brief overview of the previous results going in this direction, we present an optimal delocalization result for matrices with sub-exponential entries for all eigenvectors. The proof is based on the dynamical method introduced by Erdös–Yau, the analysis of high moments as well as new level repulsion estimates which will be presented during the talk.

This is based on a joint work with P. Lopatto.

Date and Time: 
Monday, June 1, 2020 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID 959 3090 9831 (locks at 4:10pm PST)

VR / AR / XR Panel

Topic: 
New VR / AR / XR Trends
Abstract / Description: 

Join Stanford XR for an exciting panel of XR industry leaders on Monday, June 1 from 5:00-6:00 PM Pacific Time! We have 5 different speakers from across the VR/AR/XR landscape (3 of them are Stanford alums, and 2 of those helped found Rabbit Hole VR/Stanford XR), and we have a fantastic discussion and Q&A planned for you centered around new trends in XR, connecting a socially-distanced world, and the future of immersive tech.

You don't want to miss it (but if you have to please RSVP so we can send you the recording after)!
RSVP Form: bit.ly/SXRPanel20RSVP
Zoom Link: bit.ly/SXRPanel20Zoom
Google Calendar: bit.ly/SXRPanel20Cal

Date and Time: 
Monday, June 1, 2020 - 5:00pm
Venue: 
RSVP for link

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Workshop on Inverse Design using SPINS"

Topic: 
Workshop on Inverse Design using SPINS
Abstract / Description: 

The goal of this workshop is to provide attendees with a practitioner's perspective of the basic ingredients and tools of inverse design using SPINS [1], a photonic optimization framework developed at Jelena Vuckovic's Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab over the past decade.
SPINS is a flexible inverse-design platform that is compatible with a variety of device parametrizations, electromagnetic solvers, and objective functions. This has enabled SPINS to be used to design and experimentally demonstrate functional devices in a wide variety of different application areas including grating couplers [2-4], optical routing for LiDAR [5], and electron accelerators [6].
In this workshop, we will work through examples of using SPINS to design simple devices, including grating couplers and silicon photonics devices. We will emphasize how attendees can adapt these examples for their own applications and discuss some practical considerations for using inverse-design to produce functional devices. All example code will be available online after the workshop.

[1] Su, L. et al. Nanophotonic inverse design with SPINS: software architecture and practical considerations. Appl. Phys. Rev. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5131263 (2020).
[2] Su, L. et al. Fully-automated optimization of grating couplers. Optics Express, 26(4): 4023–4034, 2018.
[3] Sapra, N. V. et al. Inverse design and demonstration of broadband grating couplers. IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 25, 1–7 (2019).
[4] Dory, etl al. Inverse-designed diamond photonics. Nature Communications, 10(1):3309, 2019.
[5] Yang, K. Skarda, J. et al., Inverse-designed non-reciprocal pulse router for chip-based LiDAR, Nature Photonics DOI: 10.1038/s41566-020-0606-0 (2020)
[6] Sapra, N. V. et al., On-chip integrated laser-driven particle accelerator. Science 367, 79-83 (2020).

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 945 5728 7546 (password required)

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