Graduate

SystemX Seminar: Smart Internet Connections: Your internet connection’s use of artificial intelligence and machine learning

Topic: 
Smart Internet Connections: Your internet connection’s use of artificial intelligence and machine learning
Abstract / Description: 

The next generation of internet communication has many uses for machine learning. This talk will review some of the applications for and types of 5th-generation converged software-defined communication networks, including the important access links to all users/consumers and devices/things, upon which humanity increasing and crucially depends. The general problem well addressed by communications theory is the inference from a large set of data (sometimes called a "channel" output) of a desired/intended conclusion (sometimes called the "channel input" or data "transmitted"); this is sometimes also known as "decoding." Many learning systems like search engines, detection of diseases, facial recognition, etc are all forms of this "decoding." Many of the methods for "machine learning" can be recast in this more general setting, and as well then re-used to advance further the art of next-generation communication. The talk will encourage further investigation into both the "learning" and advancement of the future networks that will increasingly connect us all. Some of these topics will be further examined in EE392AA (spring quarter), which can be used for EE MS Communications Depth sequence.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 11, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Quantum vs. Classical optimization: A Status Update on the Arms Race

Topic: 
Quantum vs. Classical optimization: A Status Update on the Arms Race
Abstract / Description: 

Can quantum computers meet the tantalizing promise of solving complex calculations - such as optimization problems or database queries - faster than classical computers based on transistor technologies? Although IBM recently opened up their five-qubit programmable quantum computer to the public to tinker with, the holy grail of a useful large-scale programmable universal quantum computer is decades away. While working mid-scale programmable special-purpose quantum optimization machines exist, a conclusive detection of quantum speedup remains controversial despite recent promising results. In this talk, a head-to-head comparison between quantum and classical optimization approaches is given. Current quantum annealing technologies must outperform classical devices to claim the crown in the race for quantum speedup.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

EE Distinguished Lecture: Lars Blackmore, SpaceX

Topic: 
Landing SpaceX's Reusable Rockets
Abstract / Description: 

SpaceX's reusable rocket program aims to reduce the cost of space travel by making rockets that can land, refuel and refly, instead of being thrown away after every flight. Autonomous precision landing of a rocket is a unique problem, which has been likened to balancing a rubber broomstick on your hand in a windstorm. Rockets do not have wings (unlike airplanes) and they cannot rely on a high ballistic coefficient to fly in a straight line (unlike missiles). In the past two years, SpaceX has successfully landed nineteen rockets, some of which were on dry land at Cape Canaveral, and some of which were on floating platforms in the ocean. This talk will discuss the challenges involved, how these challenges were overcome, and next steps towards rapid reusability.

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 12, 2018 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
NEW LOCATION: 420-040, Jordan Hall

SystemX Seminar: Materials and device innovations in the scaling and post-scaling eras

Topic: 
Materials and device innovations in the scaling and post-scaling eras
Abstract / Description: 

With creative innovations and significant technical effort, semiconductor technology scaling is now continuing deeper into nm dimensions. The ultimate lateral dimensions, or ultimate number of layers in 3D stacking may be under debate, but not the fact that there are fundamental or practical (technical and economic) limits to exponential improvements. The industry is already transitioning towards an era in which innovations are enabling advantages for just one or two generations. This talk presents an overview of scaling showing examples of how innovations in materials, devices and design-technology co-optimization enabled scaling and continue to do so towards the 5nm and 3 nm nodes. We also discuss some of the fundamental limits of pitch scaling as well as perspectives on beyond pitch scaling approaches, 3D stacking and heterogeneous and system level integration that will allow to continue to enhance system capabilities, and how emerging applications such as neuromorphic computing impact and drive hardware requirements and development, and open new growth opportunities.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018

IEEE-EDS Distinguished Lecture: 2D Electronics – Opportunities and Challenges

Topic: 
2D Electronics – Opportunities and Challenges
Abstract / Description: 

During the past decade, 2D (two-dimensional) materials have attracted enormous attention from various scientific communities ranging from chemists and physicists to material scientists and device engineers. The rise of the 2D materials began in 2004 with the work on graphene done at Manchester University and Georgia Tech. Particularly the observed high carrier mobilities raised early expectations that graphene could be a perfect electronic material. It soon became clear, however, that due its zero bandgap graphene is not suitable for most electronic devices, in particular transistors. On the other hand, researchers have extended their work to 2D materials beyond graphene and the number of 2D materials under investigation is continuously rising. Many of them possess sizeable bandgaps and therefore are considered to be useful for transistors. Indeed, the progress in the field of 2D transistors has been rapid and experimental MOSFETs using semiconducting 2D channel materials have been reported by many groups. A recent achievement was the demonstration of a well-performing 1-nm gate MoS2 MOSFET in 2016. On the other hand, and in spite of the progress in the field, the debate on the real prospects of the 2D materials for future electronics is still controversial.

In the present lecture, the most important classes of 2D materials are introduced and the potential of 2D transistors is assessed as realistically as possible. To this end, two material properties – bandgap and mobility – are examined in detail and the mobility-bandgap tradeoff is discussed. The state of the art of 2D transistors is reviewed by summarizing relevant results of leading groups in the field, presenting examples of the lecturer's own work on 2D electronics, and comparing the performance of 2D transistors to that of competing conventional transistors. Based on these considerations, a balanced view of both the pros and cons of 2D transistors is provided and their potential in both the More Moore (digital CMOS) and the More Than Moore domains of semiconductor electronics is discussed. It is shown that due to the rather conservative CMOS scaling scenario of the 2015 ITRS (compared to the more aggressive scenarios of the previous ITRS editions) it will be difficult for 2D materials to make inroads into mainstream CMOS. However, due to their specific properties (for example, 2D materials are bendable and stretchable) they may enable entirely new applications in the More Than Moore domain.

Date and Time: 
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN & EE 292E: Compressed Ultrafast Photography and Microscopy: Redefining the Limit of Passive Ultrafast Imaging

Topic: 
Compressed Ultrafast Photography and Microscopy: Redefining the Limit of Passive Ultrafast Imaging
Abstract / Description: 

High-speed imaging is an indispensable technology for blur-free observation of fast transient dynamics in virtually all areas including science, industry, defense, energy, and medicine. Unfortunately, the frame rates of conventional cameras are significantly constrained by their data transfer bandwidth and onboard storage. We demonstrate a two-dimensional dynamic imaging technique, compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), which can capture non-repetitive time-evolving events at up to 100 billion fps. Compared with existing ultrafast imaging techniques, CUP has a prominent advantage of measuring an x, y, t (x, y, spatial coordinates; t, time) scene with a single camera snapshot, thereby allowing observation of transient events occurring on a time scale down to tens of picoseconds. Thanks to the CUP technology, for the first time, the human can see light pulses on the fly. Because this technology advances the imaging frame rate by orders of magnitude, we now enter a new regime and open new visions.

In this talk, I will discuss our recent effort to develop a second-generation CUP system and demonstrate its applications at scales from macroscopic to microscopic. For the first time, we imaged photonic Mach cones and captured "Sonic Boom" of light in action. Moreover, by adapting CUP for microscopy, we enabled two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime imaging at an unprecedented speed. The advantage of CUP recording is that even visually simple systems can be scientifically interesting when they are captured at such a high speed. Given CUP's capability, we expect it to find widespread applications in both fundamental and applied sciences including biomedical research.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Special Seminar: Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design

Topic: 
Formal Methods meets Machine Learning: Explorations in Cyber-Physical Systems Design
Abstract / Description: 

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are computational systems tightly integrated with physical processes. Examples include modern automobiles, fly-by-wire aircraft, software-controlled medical devices, robots, and many more. In recent times, these systems have exploded in complexity due to the growing amount of software and networking integrated into physical environments via real-time control loops, as well as the growing use of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. At the same time, these systems must be designed with strong verifiable guarantees.

In this talk, I will describe our research explorations at the intersection of machine learning and formal methods that address some of the challenges in CPS design. First, I will describe how machine learning techniques can be blended with formal methods to address challenges in specification, design, and verification of industrial CPS. In particular, I will discuss the use of formal inductive synthesis --- algorithmic synthesis from examples with formal guarantees — for CPS design. Next, I will discuss how formal methods can be used to improve the level of assurance in systems that rely heavily on machine learning, such as autonomous vehicles using deep learning for perception. Both theory and industrial case studies will be discussed, with a special focus on the automotive domain. I will conclude with a brief discussion of the major remaining challenges posed by the use of machine learning and AI in CPS.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 4, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 463A

SystemX Special Seminar: THz Wireless Communications: New Opportunities and Challenges

Topic: 
THz Wireless Communications: New Opportunities and Challenges
Abstract / Description: 

Ultra-broadband Millimeter (mm) and Terahertz (THz) wireless communication systems are expected to help satisfy the ever-growing need for smaller devices that can offer higher speed wireless communication anywhere and anytime. The large bandwidth paired with higher speed wireless links opens up the door to a large number of novel applications such as 1) ultra-high-speed cellular links, 2) wireless short range communications for ultra-high-speed data transfer, 3) secure wireless communication for military and defense applications, 4) on-body sensors for health monitoring systems. To enable future mm- and THz-range wireless communications for these different applications, it is imperative to understand propagation mechanisms and develop good channel models.

This talk compares propagation characteristics of three frequency bands: 30 GHz (26-40 GHz), 140 GHz (110-170 GHz) and 300 GHz (300-316 GHz), discusses propagation mechanisms that are prevalent at these frequencies and proposes techniques for modeling THz wireless channels.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 1:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

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