Graduate

Three principles of data science: predictability, stability, and computability

Topic: 
Three principles of data science: predictability, stability, and computability
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk, I'd like to discuss the intertwining importance and connections of three principles of data science in the title.

They will be demonstrated in the context of two collaborative projects in neuroscience and genomics, respectively. The first project in neuroscience uses transfer learning to integrate fitted convolutional neural networks (CNNs) on ImageNet with regression methods to provide predictive and stable characterizations of neurons from the challenging primary visual cortex V4. The second project proposes iterative random forests (iRF) as a stablized RF to seek predictable and interpretable high-order interactions among biomolecules.


 

Lunch is provided and will be served at 12:45 pm.
Please RSVP here by Friday, April 13

Organizers: Guido Imbens, Susan Athey, Mohsen Bayati, and Stefan Wager
Sponsored by: Institute for Research in the Social Sciences and Graduate School of Business

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 16, 2018 - 1:10pm

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Reverse Engineering the Universe

Topic: 
Reverse Engineering the Universe
Abstract / Description: 

Prof. Andrei Linde of the Stanford Physics Department will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium on Tues., May 8, 2018 entitled "Reverse Engineering the Universe."

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Demonology: The Curious Role of Intelligence in Physics & Biology

Topic: 
Demonology: The Curious Role of Intelligence in Physics & Biology
Abstract / Description: 

For the lion's share of its history, physics analyzed the inanimate world. Or, that is the view it has of itself. Careful reflection, though, shows that physics regularly invoked an expressly extra-physical agency—intelligence—in its efforts to understand even the most basic physical phenomena. I will survey this curious proclivity, noting that similar appeals to intelligent "demons" go back to Laplace's theory of chance, Poincaré's discovery of deterministic chaos in the solar system, and Darwin's explanation of the origin of biological organisms in terms of natural selection. Today, we are on the verge of a new physics of information that will transform this bad "demonology" to a constructive, perhaps even an engineering, paradigm that explains information processing embedded in the natural world. In the process I will show how deterministic chaos arises in the operation of Maxwell's Demon and outline nanoscale experimental implementations ongoing at Caltech's Kavli Nanoscience Institute.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Top Quarks: The New Flavor

Topic: 
Top Quarks: The New Flavor
Abstract / Description: 

The Large Hadron Collider is providing an enormous dataset of proton-proton collisions at the highest energies ever achieved in a laboratory.

With our new ability to study the Higgs boson and the unprecedentedly large sample of top quarks, a new frontier has opened: the flavor physics of the top quark - at heart, the question of how the top quark interacts with the Higgs field. We can start to ask questions such as whether the Higgs field is the unique source of the top quark's mass and whether there are unexpected interactions between the top quark and the Higgs boson. The answers to these questions will shed light on what may lie beyond the particle physics Standard Model and have cosmological implications.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 10, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: The End of Privacy

Topic: 
The End of Privacy
Abstract / Description: 

A growing proportion of human activities such as social interactions, entertainment, shopping, and gathering information are now mediated by digital devices and services. Such digitally mediated activities can be easily recorded, offering an unprecedented opportunity to study and measure intimate psycho-demographic traits using actual--rather than self-reported--behavior. Our research shows that digital records of behavior, such as samples of text, Tweets, Facebook Likes, web-browsing logs, or even facial images can be used to accurately measure a wide range of traits including personality, intelligence, and political views. Such Big Data assessment has a number of advantages: it does not require participants' active involvement; it can be easily and inexpensively applied to large populations; and it is relatively immune to cheating or misrepresentation. If used ethically, it could revolutionize psychological assessment, marketing, recruitment, insurance, and many other industries. In the wrong hands, however, such methods pose significant privacy risks. In this talk, we will discuss how to reap the benefits of Big Data assessment while avoiding the pitfalls.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Optics & Electronics Seminar: The Physics and Applications of high Q optical microcavities: Cavity Quantum Optomechanics

Topic: 
The Physics and Applications of high Q optical microcavities: Cavity Quantum Optomechanics
Abstract / Description: 

TBA

Date and Time: 
Monday, May 14, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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