Graduate

OSA/SPIE Seminar: Imaging at the Nanoscale Within Live Brain Tissues

Topic: 
Imaging at the Nanoscale Within Live Brain Tissues
Abstract / Description: 

Single molecule microscopy allows nanometer localization of the detected emitters and subtle probing of their spatio-temporal nano-environment including in living neuronal cells [1]. I will present several single molecule strategies using different nano-emitters to probe complex and confined neuronal environments.

These include the development of a new probe delivery method in the live animal brain to perform the first single quantum dot tracking in acute brain slices [2] and an original strategy based on phase imaging aiming towards 3D single particle tracking and 3D super-resolution microscopy in thick cellular environments [3].

For deep tissue imaging, single walled carbon nanotubes, which bear optical resonances in the near infrared and nanoscale dimensions, are particularly promising [4]. I will show that, long trajectories (>10 min) of nanotubes diffusing in the brain extracellular space can be recorded at the single nanotube level. Analysis their movements provides super-resolved maps of tissue structuration which can be modulated upon biochemical digestion of the brain extracellular matrix in live animals [5].

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

The ATLAS Reverse-GPS System: High-Throughput Wildlife Tracking

Topic: 
The ATLAS Reverse-GPS System: High-Throughput Wildlife Tracking
Abstract / Description: 

ATLAS is a reverse-GPS system that localizes radio transmitters (tags) attached to wild animals. The tags are lightweight (down to less than 1g), inexpensive, and energy-efficient. These properties have allowed us to track animals at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution, leading to a big-data/high-throughput revolution in movement ecology. One ATLAS system with up to 11 receivers has been deployed for over 3 years in Northern Israel, last summer two more were deployed (in the Netherlands and in England), and one more is currently being deployed.

The talk will describe the multifaceted challenges that the system has posed, innovations and engineering efforts that were necessary to meet the challenges, and the impact of the system on wildlife ecology. In particular, I will describe work on localization and clock synchronization, on tag development and production, on receiver hardware and software (base stations), on data collection and visualization, and on system configuration and monitoring. I will also clearly list key remaining challenges and our own future plans.

The talk will also briefly explain the overall context: what other options exist for GPS-quality wildlife tracking and why no other technique can approach the throughput and cost of ATLAS.

This is joint work with Ran Nathan, Yotam Orchan, Tony Weiss, and many other collaborators.

http://www.tau.ac.il/~stoledo/tags/

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 22, 2018 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Gates 219

Intro to Unity Workshop

Topic: 
Intro to Unity Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

From Rabbit Hole VR Club: Come build your own game from the ground up using Unity, the main game engine used for VR development in the industry. We will go over most aspects necessary for using Unity, including use of the Asset Store, basic programming structures of Unity scripts, creating user interfaces, and building a publishable exe.

The workshop will be lead by Khoi Le, a Rabbit Hole member who has been working with Unity for 2 years. The event will be held Saturday, 1/20 in Lab64 from 6-8 pm. Bring your laptop and make sure to download Unity before coming.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, January 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
lab64 (Packard 064)

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: Combining Physical and Statistical Models in Order to Narrow Uncertainty in Projected of Global Warming

Topic: 
Combining Physical and Statistical Models in Order to Narrow Uncertainty in Projected of Global Warming
Abstract / Description: 

A key question in climate science is How much global warming should we expect for a given increase in the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gasses like carbon dioxide? One strategy for addressing this question is to run physical models of the global climate system but these models vary in their estimates of future warming by about a factor of two. Our research has attempted to narrow this range of uncertainty around model-projected future warming and to assess whether the upper or lower end of the model range is more likely. We showed that there are strong statistical relationships between how models simulate fundamental features of the Earth's energy budget over the recent past, and how much warming models simulate in the future. Importantly, we find that models that match observations the best over the recent past, tend to simulate more warming in the future than the average model. Thus, statistically combining information from physical models and observations tells us that we should expect more warming (with smaller uncertainty ranges) than we would expect if we were just looking at physical models in isolation and ignoring observations.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SmartGrid Seminar: Johanna Mathieu

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Daniel Kirschen

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Anthony Rowe

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 8, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Deepak Divan

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

SmartGrid Seminar: Adam Wierman

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

The speakers are renowned scholars or industry experts in power and energy systems. We believe they will bring novel insights and fruitful discussions to Stanford. This seminar is offered as a 1 unit seminar course, CEE 272T/EE292T. Interested students can take this seminar course for credit by completing a project based on the topics presented in this course.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

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