EE Student Information

Graduate

Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance and Stanford Sustainable Finance Initiative Open House for Students

Topic: 
STC | SFI Open House for Students
Abstract / Description: 

Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance and Stanford Sustainable Finance Initiative Open House for Students

 

Interested in tackling climate risk and opportunity through business and financial innovation? Want to work on decarbonization at the intersection of technology, policy and finance?


Then don't miss the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance and Stanford Sustainable Finance Initiative's annual student open house.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 5:00pm
Venue: 
Stanford Law School, Manning Faculty Lounge

US-ATMC: Smart City Infrastructure for Mobility

Topic: 
Smart City Infrastructure for Mobility
Abstract / Description: 

Join us for an introduction to the vision and activities of the major Toyota spin-out initiative Woven Planet Holdings and a discussion of how they are developing new value around the ways that people and goods will move, and also the things that individuals can do while on-the-move, as smart city architectures become reality. We will also discuss the Toyota Woven City testbed for smart city development located near Mt. Fuji, Japan.

Please visit asia.stanford.edu for more details.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 5:30pm

US-ATMC: Mobile Communications: The Future of Digital Transformation in India

Topic: 
Mobile Communications: The Future of Digital Transformation in India
Abstract / Description: 

This roundtable discussion examines how India has rapidly developed a remarkably advanced infrastructure for mobile communications and how this infrastructure is enabling a revolution in mobile applications for payments and banking, education, tele-health, and other areas.  How are these mobile approaches causing digital transformation of industry in India?  What are the challenges and paths forward for mobile communications in India and what lessons can India provide as a model for other economies regarding mobile communications?

 

Please visit asia.stanford.edu/course/topics-in-international-technology-management/2021-mobility-asia-moves-forward-in-the-4th-industrial-revolution for more details.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 11, 2021 - 5:30pm

Safe and Efficient Reinforcement Learning for Power System Control

Topic: 
Safe and Efficient Reinforcement Learning for Power System Control
Abstract / Description: 
Inverter-based resources such as solar and storage provide us with more flexibility in the control of power systems. Through their power electronic interfaces, complex control functions can be implemented to quickly respond to changes in the system. Recently, reinforcement learning has emerged as a popular method to find these nonlinear controllers. The key challenge with a learning-based approach is that stability and safety constraints are difficult to enforce on the learned controllers. Using a Lyapunov theory-based approach, we show how to explicitly engineer the structure of neural network controllers such that they guarantee system stability. The resulting controllers only use local information and outperform conventional droop as well as strategies learned purely by using reinforcement learning.
Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 11, 2021 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Smart Grid Seminar: Designing a 100% Renewable Energy System

Topic: 
Designing a 100% Renewable Energy System
Abstract / Description: 

Dr. Jens Madrian will outline NEOM Energy's strategy to develop the world's first 100% renewable energy system. The key focus areas will be system design goals, intermittency challenges, and key enablers for system stabilization and optimization.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 10:00am

AP/P Colloquium: “The Magic of Moiré Materials”

Topic: 
The Magic of Moiré Materials
Abstract / Description: 

Two-dimensional crystals that are overlaid with a difference in lattice constant or a relative twist form a moiré pattern. In semiconductors and semimetals, the low-energy electronic properties of these systems are described by Hamiltonians that have the periodicity of the moiré pattern, opening up a strategy to make artificial two-dimensional crystals with lattice constants on the ten nm scale. I refer to these artificial crystals as moiré materials. Because of their large lattice constants, the band filling factors of moiré materials can be tuned over large ranges without introducing chemical dopants simply by using electrical gates. Moiré materials, can be used to flexibly simulate the physics of real atomic scale crystals, and to create new states of matter. I will overview progress that has been made in understanding the low-temperature properties of the first moiré materials - twisted graphene in which electron velocities vanish at discrete magic angles and transition-metal dichalcogenides that simulate atomic scale Hubbard model physics - and provide a perspective on prospects for future room-temperature applications.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

ISL Colloquium: GLOM: Representing part-whole hierarchies in a neural network

Topic: 
GLOM: Representing part-whole hierarchies in a neural network
Abstract / Description: 

I will present a single idea about representation which allows advances made by several different groups to be combined into an imaginary system called GLOM. The advances include transformers, neural fields, contrastive representation learning, distillation and capsules. GLOM answers the question: How can a neural network with a fixed architecture parse an image into a part-whole hierarchy which has a different structure for each image? The idea is simply to use islands of identical vectors to represent the nodes in the parse tree. The talk will discuss the many ramifications of this idea. If GLOM can be made to work, it should significantly improve the interpretability of the representations produced by transformer-like systems when applied to vision or language.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 10:00am

IT-Forum: Estimating and optimizing Information Measures using neural networks and its application in communication

Topic: 
Estimating and optimizing Information Measures using neural networks and its application in communication
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk we will develop a principled framework for neural estimation and optimization of information measures, which is then leveraged to estimate the feedforward and feedback capacities of general channels. To that end we propose a novel Directed Information Neural Estimator (DINE) that complements the Mutual Information Neural Estimation (MINE), and then develop methods for optimizing DINE and MINE over the channel input distributions. More specifically, two optimization methods are proposed, one for continuous channel input spaces and the other for discrete. While capacity estimation is the main application considered in this talk, we will discuss how the developed estimation and optimization techniques are applicable in additional scenarios where (maximized) Directed Information is of interest such as probability density estimation for processes with memory, causality identification and machine learning in general.

The talk is based on a joint work with Dor Tzur, Ziv Aharoni and Ziv Goldfeld.

Date and Time: 
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 1:00pm
Venue: 
Linvil Room, Allen Bldg.

EE Gingerbread Contest '21 - Sign-up deadline

Topic: 
Gingerbread Contest - Sign-up deadline
Abstract / Description: 

Dear EE Community,

You are invited to EE's annual Gingerbread House Contest! Come together with your friends/labmates/colleagues to craft the best gingerbread house. This event is open to all EE faculty, students, and staff.

Event: EE Gingerbread Contest 2021
Date: Thursday, November 11, 2021
Location: Packard Atrium
Time: 12pm-2pm
Sign-up link: https://forms.gle/3Zu35G56goTsnXYe7
Sign-up deadline: Friday, November 5, 2021

Contest Rules:

  • Teams may have 3-4 members, and at least 2 members must be in the EE department.
  • Teams will have 45 minutes to complete their gingerbread house.
  • A team of judges will determine the winners based on originality/creativity, completeness and technical skill.
  • Graham crackers, assortment of candy, and frosting will be provided. You're welcome to bring additional props/decorations for your gingerbread house.
  • Be as creative and innovative as you want.
  • Most importantly, have fun!

 

Hosted by EE Student Services

Date and Time: 
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 12:00am to 11:55pm
Venue: 
Packard Atrium

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