EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Graduate

StanfordXR welcomes Snap Inc.

Topic: 
Senior SWE Manager (Snap, Inc.)
Abstract / Description: 

Learn about augmented reality with a Senior SWE Manager from Snap! The talk is welcome to all students, just be sure to RSVP.

AR technologies at Snap include face and full-body tracking, cats & dogs tracking, marker tracking, 6DoF world tracking & surface tracking, as well as sky segmentation, object classification, and so much more.

Our speakers will spend the first 30 minutes going over face tracking and the unique aspects of AR at Snap, with some time left at the end for live Q&A.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Registration required

US-Asia Technology Management Center presents "Crowdfunding and the Global Transformation of Consumer Product Makers in Asia"

Topic: 
Crowdfunding and the Global Transformation of Consumer Product Makers in Asia
Abstract / Description: 

Fall 2020 Public Seminar Series: Digital Transformation Among New and Traditional Industries in Asia - (Weekly: September 17 – November 19)

To view past sessions and see upcoming scheduled speakers in the series, please visit Asia.Stanford.edu

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Registration required

SCIEN and EE292E present "Functional imaging and control of retinal ganglion cells in the living primate eye"

Topic: 
Functional imaging and control of retinal ganglion cells in the living primate eye
Abstract / Description: 

The encapsulation of the retina inside the eye has always challenged our ability to study the anatomy and physiology of retinal neurons in their native state. Our group is developing new tools using adaptive optics that allow not only structural imaging but also functional recording and control of retinal neurons at a cellular spatial scale. By combining adaptive optics with calcium imaging, we can optically record from hundreds of ganglion cells in the nonhuman primate eye over periods as along as years. This approach is especially well-suited for recording from cells serving the central fovea, which has been difficult to access with microelectrodes. Using optogenetics, we can also directly excite these same ganglion cells with light in the living animal. These capabilities together establish a two-way communication link with retinal ganglion cells. I will discuss the advantages and the current limitations of these approaches, as well as speculate about possible future applications for vision restoration and understanding the role of the retina in perception.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Registration required

IT Forum presents "Towards Model Agnostic Robustness"

Topic: 
Towards Model Agnostic Robustness
Abstract / Description: 

It is now common practice to try and solve machine learning problems by starting with a complex existing model or architecture, and fine-tuning/adapting it to the task at hand. However, outliers, errors or even just sloppiness in training data often lead to drastic drops in performance.

We investigate a simple generic approach to correct for this, motivated by a classic statistical idea: trimmed loss. This advocates jointly (a) selecting which training samples to ignore, and (b) fitting a model on the remaining samples. As such this is computationally infeasible even for linear regression. We propose and study the natural iterative variant that alternates between these two steps (a) and (b) - each of which individually can be easily accomplished in pretty much any statistical setting. We also study the batch-SGD variant of this idea. We demonstrate both theoretically (for generalized linear models) and empirically (for moderate-sized neural network models) that this effectively recovers accuracy in the presence of bad training data.

This work is joint with Yanyao Shen and Vatsal Shah and appears in NeurIPS 2019, ICML 2019 and AISTATS 2020.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Registration required

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Advances in our understanding of the airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2"

Topic: 
Advances in our understanding of the airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2
Abstract / Description: 

This talk will focus on the latest research on the transmission of SARS-CoV-2.

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 93508828137; +Password

QFARM Quantum Seminar Series presents "Millimeter-wave photons for quantum science"

Topic: 
Millimeter-wave photons for quantum science
Abstract / Description: 

Millimeter-wave frequencies (30-300GHz) provide a promising platform for quantum information technology at less explored but potentially beneficial length and energy scales. In this talk, I will discuss the advantages of the mm-wave band and describe our hybrid quantum system for entangling and inter-converting single mm-wave and optical photons using Rydberg atoms as mediators. I will go over our experimental progress and potential applications of our system for frequency transduction and quantum nonlinear photonics. To conclude, I will describe some applications of mm-wave photons we have explored for 2D nonlinear devices, photonic crystals, and twisted mm-wave Fabry-Perot cavities.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom meeting ID: 987 676 025; password required

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Discovering the Highest Energy Neutrinos"

Topic: 
Discovering the Highest Energy Neutrinos
Abstract / Description: 

The detection of high energy astrophysical neutrinos is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators. IceCube, a large optical detector at the South Pole, has observed the first astrophysical neutrinos and identified at least one potential source. However, the best sensitivity at the highest energies comes from detectors that look for coherent radio Cherenkov emission from neutrino interactions. I will give an overview of the state of current experimental efforts, including recent results, and then discuss a suite of new experiments designed to discover neutrinos at the highest energies and push the energy threshold for radio detection down to overlap with the energy range probed by IceCube, thus covering the full astrophysical energy range out to the highest energies, and opening up new phase space for discovery. These include ground-based experiments such as RNO-G and IceCube-Gen2, as well as the balloon-borne experiment PUEO.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 946 67 170 862; +passcode

US-Asia Technology Mgmt Ctr panel discussion "Pinktober: Save More Than A Life"

Topic: 
Pinktober: Save More Than A Life
Abstract / Description: 

October 27 Pinktober: Save More Than A Life

Join for a panel discussion launching a campaign to accelerate screening of women in under-served communities in India and Africa.

Presented by: Aaroogya Foundation and Silicon Valley Global Health in cooperation with the Indian National Women's Hockey Team, Pinga Healthtech, and the US-Asia Technology Management Center at Stanford University

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 8:30am

US-Asia Technology Management Center presents "Autonomous Vehicles and the Digital Transformation of the Automotive Industry in Asia"

Topic: 
Autonomous Vehicles and the Digital Transformation of the Automotive Industry in Asia
Abstract / Description: 

Join US-ATMC for a seminar with Dr. James Peng which will focus on how autonomous vehicles are impacting and transforming the automotive industry and possibly other areas around ground transportation industries. With autonomous vehicles, there are a new set of industry players that may be poised to disrupt the existing old guard. The evolution of self-driving vehicles is also revealing major shifts in the global center of gravity of the automotive industry — toward Asia. This seminar will share perspectives on how these trends appear at present and how they may evolve in the future.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 4:30pm

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