EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Graduate

SmartGrid Seminar

Topic: 
Phase Boundary Computation for Marginally Stable Nonlinear Systems
Abstract / Description: 

In the study of nonlinear dynamical systems, it is useful to determine the (parameter space) phase boundary that separates stable from unstable behaviour. This presentation will consider algorithms which achieve that goal through the use of shooting methods and Euler homotopy continuation. Firstly, the trajectory is forced to remain in the proximity of an unstable equilibrium point (UEP) for a specified time. That time is then progressively increased, ensuring the trajectory approaches the UEP arbitrarily closely. This process can be used to explore trade-offs between parameters. It also forms the basis for robustness assessment by establishing the minimum distance (in parameter space) from a given operating point to the phase boundary. The various concepts will be illustrated through examples that consider "fault induced delayed voltage recovery" (FIDVR), a vulnerability of distribution networks where residential air-conditioning is prevalent.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2-300

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

Topic: 
Rethinking Memory System Design for Data-Intensive Computing
Abstract / Description: 

The memory system is a fundamental performance and energy bottleneck in almost all computing systems. Recent system design, application, and technology trends that require more capacity, bandwidth, efficiency, and predictability out of the memory system make it an even more important system bottleneck. At the same time, DRAM and flash technologies are experiencing difficult technology scaling challenges that make the maintenance and enhancement of their capacity, energy-efficiency, and reliability significantly more costly with conventional techniques.

In this talk, we examine some promising research and design directions to overcome challenges posed by memory scaling. Specifically, we discuss three key solution directions: 1) enabling new memory architectures, functions, interfaces, and better integration of the memory and the rest of the system, 2) designing a memory system that intelligently employs multiple memory technologies and coordinates memory and storage management using non-volatile memory technologies, 3) providing predictable performance and QoS to applications sharing the memory/storage system. If time permits, we might also briefly touch upon our ongoing related work in combating scaling challenges of NAND flash memory.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

OSA Seminar

Topic: 
Leveraging Advances in Computational Electrodynamics to Enable New Kinds of Nanophotonic Device Design
Abstract / Description: 

Advances in computational electrodynamics have the potential to enable fundamentally new kinds of designs in nanophotonic devices which are based principally on complex, non-analytical wave-interference effects. Powerful, flexible, open-source software tools have now been made available for use in large-scale, parallel computations to model the interaction of light with practically any kind of material in any arbitrary geometry. These recent developments in computational capability now make possible the investigation of various emergent structures and physical phenomena that were previously beyond the reach of pencil-and-paper analytical methods as well as less versatile and even less accessible commercial software tools. Here, I demonstrate how such advances in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods for computational electromagnetism via an open-source software package known as MEEP can lead to entirely new designs for light trapping in nanostructured thin-film silicon solar cells as well as light extraction from nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs).

In the last part of this seminar, I will provide a live demonstration of launching MEEP simulations on an on-demand high-performance computing (HPC) cluster in the cloud through our startup, Simpetus. Simpetus provides a holistic solution to the three main challenges of using simulations for research and development: 1) no software licenses or installation, 2) no hardware acquisition or maintenance and 3) technical support from the experts. The mission of Simpetus is to propel computational simulations to the forefront of photonics research and development.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 1:45pm to 3:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Special ISL-SystemX Seminar: Architecting Tb/s Wireless

Topic: 
Architecting Tb/s Wireless
Abstract / Description: 

Wireless communications along with the Internet has been the most transformative technology in the past 50 years. We expect that wireless growth driven by the need to connect all humankind (not just 1/3) as well as Billions of things to the Internet will require Terabit/s shared links for ground based local area and wide area wireless access, for wireless backhaul as well as access via unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and satellites. We present a new scalable radio architecture that we refer to multi-comm-core (MCC) to enable low-cost Terabit/s wireless using both traditional and millimeter wave spectrum.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

SystemX: The Transistor and the Floating-Gate Memory

Topic: 
The Transistor and the Floating-Gate Memory
Abstract / Description: 

Bell Laboratories (also known as Bell Labs) was established in 1925 as a research and development organization of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T). At its peak (from mid 1940s to late 1980s) Bell Labs was considered the most prominent research institution in the world, having 30,000 staff with 4,000 Ph.Ds and an annual budget of US$3 billion. There have been seven Nobel Prizes awarded for work completed at Bell Labs.

For 90 years, Bell Labs has discovered or invented a wide range of revolutionary technologies in communication and computing. The most important discovery at Bell Labs is the transistor effect discovered by Bardeen, Brattain and Shockley in 1947. Transistors replaced vacuum tubes and ushered in the Modern Electronics Age. Bell Labs also invented many important semiconductor devices including the thyristor, HBT, JFET, silicon solar cell, MOSFET, IMPATT diode, and CCD. In addition, Bell Labs developed most of the basic semiconductor processing technologies including the zone refining, ion implantation, growth of single-crystal silicon, diffusion, oxide masking and molecular-beam epitaxy.

Dr. Sze was very lucky because his years at Bell Labs (1963-1989) were in the Golden Era of the company. Bell Labs provided a stimulating and challenging environment in which I was welcomed, inspired and abundantly assisted. My main contribution at Bell Labs was the discovery of the floating-gate memory effect with Dawon Kahng in 1967. This seminal discovery has given rise to a large family of memory devices including EEPROM and Flash memory. The floating-gate memory effect is probably the 2nd most important discovery in Bell Labs' history, because it has revolutionized the information-storage technology, ushered in the Digital Age, and brought unprecedented benefits to humankind.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, August 12, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

New EE Graduate Student Orientation

Topic: 
EE graduate student orientation
Abstract / Description: 

An annual event for new EE PhD and MS students. Check in is in Sequoia Plaza between the Hewlett and Packard buildings.

Activities include research-area breakout sessions, student/faculty lunches, an overview of academic requirements, a scavenger hunt and many more fun events!

Date and Time: 
Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 8:00am to Friday, September 18, 2015 - 1:00pm
Venue: 
Sequoia Plaza (between Packard and Hewlett Buildings)
Tags: 

IT-Forum

Topic: 
Recursive Estimation and Application of Multivariate Markov Processes
Abstract / Description: 

A multivariate Markov process is a vector of random processes which are jointly, but not necessarily individually, Markov. Multivariate Markov processes form a rich family of mathematically tractable models, which have been found useful in numerous applications. Examples include the hidden Markov process in discrete-time, and the Markov modulated Poisson process in continuous-time. Multivariate Markov processes lend themselves to the mathematical tractability of Markov processes while allowing nonMarkovian features for the individual process components. For example, while the distribution of the sojourn time of a multivariate Markov chain in each of its states is geometric or exponential, the distribution of the sojourn time of an individual process component in each of its states is phase-type. In this talk we present forward recursions for some statistics of discrete and continuous-time multivariate Markov processes, which are relevant to their parameter estimation. We shall also briefly review applications in cognitive radio and network tomography.

This presentation is based on joint work with Brian L. Mark. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant CCF- 0916568.

Date and Time: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Information Session: Electrical Engineering Graduate Admissions, Washington D.C area

Topic: 
Multi-Disciplinary Opportunities for Graduate Study in EE
Abstract / Description: 

Find out more about Stanford Electrical Engineering multi-disciplinary opportunities for graduate study.

Interested applicants in the Washington, DC area are encouraged to attend this information session. 

Full details and registration are available online at https://www.cvent.com/events/stanford-graduate-study-opportunities/registration-75f4ddc233c14f40b33e362c9501fab6.aspx.

 

Please note: Event time is Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Date and Time: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
Venue: 
Washington, DC. Please register for details
Tags: 

X-Ray Imaging Seminar

Topic: 
X-ray Imaging System with the Stanford Medical Center
Abstract / Description: 

A team from Konica Minolta is on campus this week to discuss a new x-ray imaging system with the Stanford Medical Center. The new system exploits the Talbot effect to create much higher-resolution images of the skeletal system than previous x-ray devices. The team has graciously offered to give a technical presentation about the new system for the engineering community. Please attend if you are interested!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 382

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