EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Graduate

Electronics Meets Pharmaceuticals: Getting the Most out of Every Pill

Topic: 
Electronics Meets Pharmaceuticals: Getting the Most out of Every Pill
Abstract / Description: 

The practice of medicine didn't evolve for thousands of years. Starting about 100 years ago during the great influenza pandemic, the optical microscope ushered in a century of technological innovation in medicine that continues to cure disease and improve and extend the lives of millions of people. Better microscopes, such as CAT, MRI & PET scanners, enabled accurate diagnosis; pharmaceuticals tested using the scientific method gave doctors therapies to treat formerly incurable disease. Today, the study of genomics continues to revolutionize biochemistry, while mobile technology will bring these miracles to everyone, everywhere.

This presentation will first review a framework of innovation within the intersection of healthcare and mobile technology. Examples will show how mobile devices are reducing the cost and improving the performance of healthcare in the developed world while bringing modern miracles to underdeveloped regions. Proteus Digital Health® has combined electronics and pharmaceuticals to create digital medicines and wearable physiologic sensors.

The Proteus method can provide insights into medication taking behaviors and a patient's physiological response that will enable clinicians to make more informed therapeutic decisions and have evidence-based discussions with their patients on how best to approach management of their condition. By providing information to differentiate between non-response and nonadherence, the Proteus technique optimizes therapy costs (i.e. avoid unnecessary therapy changes and escalation to higher cost drugs) and use of medical resources (i.e. prevent unnecessary specialist referrals and costly complications), facilitating efficient progression through the recommended treatment pathway, and advancing patients towards their treatment goals. In the developing world, digital medicines will target the scourge of counterfeit medicines, which contaminate roughly half of Africa's supply chain.

The Proteus Patch, Ingestible Sensor, and related software will be presented. The Proteus Patch is a wearable data-logger for ambulatory recording of physiological metrics such as heart rate, activity, body angle relative to gravity, and time-stamped events, including events signaled by swallowing the Ingestible Sensor. Data from eleven clinical studies involving 492 subjects and ingestion of 20,993 ingestible sensors will be summarized.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: HALO: Hop-by-hop Adaptive Link-State Optimal Routing

Topic: 
HALO: Hop-by-hop Adaptive Link-State Optimal Routing
Abstract / Description: 

We present HALO (Hop-by-hop Adaptive Link-state Optimal routing), the first link-state routing solution with hop-by-hop packet forwarding that minimizes the cost of routing traffic through packet-switched networks. For stationary input traffic, we prove that HALO converges to the routing assignment that minimizes the cost of the network. Furthermore, our solution does not require traffic matrix as an explicit input and can adapt to changing traffic demand. We also report numerical and experimental evaluations that are used to confirm our theoretical predictions, explore additional aspects of the algorithm, and outline a proof-of-concept implementation of HALO.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm

HappEE Hour and DiscoverEE Day

Topic: 
Socializing and EE Research Areas
Abstract / Description: 

Join us for HappEE Hour and DiscoverEE Days 2015

EE Grad Students,

Join us for another HappEE Hour--We will be having Mediterranean and American hors d'ouevres this week, as well as an assortment of beverages. Please bring proof of age (21+) if you plan on drinking alcohol.

This HappEE Hour is organized by the EE Department. It coincides with the DiscoverEE days poster session for the newly admitted PhD students, who are visiting campus this week.

Posters from all EE research areas will be presented by EE graduate students. Masters students and early Ph.D. students are welcome to attend after 4pm to learn more about the EE research groups and their activities.

EE Research Areas:

Date and Time: 
Friday, March 13, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX Patio

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: Pam Samuelson

Topic: 
Please see description
Abstract / Description: 

For the past 20 years, it has been widely believed that application program interfaces (APIs) were not protectable by copyright law because they were necessary to enable interoperability among programs, a kind of functionality that copyright law does not protect. In the Oracle v Google case, a trial judge ruled that the Java APIs that Google reimplemented in independently written code for the Android platform were unprotectable by copyright law, relying on several prior appellate court decisions interpreting copyright as applied to APIs. The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) decided not to follow those rulings and reversed the lower court, holding that the Java APIs are indeed protectable by copyright law. The reasoning adopted in the CAFC decision not only nixes Google's main defense in the case, but also calls into question the rulings in other interoperability cases. In the fall of 2014 Google asked the Supreme Court to review the CAFC's ruling. The Court will decide in early 2015 whether to hear this appeal. This talk will discuss what's at stake in the case, what the legal issues being debated are, what impact the CAFC's ruling will have if the Supreme Court decides not to review it, and what may happen if the Supreme Court does hear the case.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

SmartGrid Seminar: Grid Modernization: Challenges, Opportunities, and Solutions

Topic: 
Grid Modernization: Challenges, Opportunities, and Solutions
Abstract / Description: 

Our aging grid infrastructure faces increasing challenges from multiple sources including greater demand variability, stricter environmental regulations and growing cyber security concerns. Advanced smart grid technologies provide possible solutions to tackle these challenges. Meanwhile how to best utilize these new devices and technologies such as PMUs and electric vehicles remains a challenge by itself. In this talk, I will address various topics which span a multitude of areas including demand response, stochastic optimization for renewable integration, microgrids and cyber security. I will present the technical issues in implementing these technologies and corresponding potential solutions.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 1:15pm to 2:15pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 270

SmartGrid Seminar: Modal Analysis of Power System Data

Topic: 
Modal Analysis of Power System Data
Abstract / Description: 

Reliable operation of the power grid relies on the real-time stabilization of an interconnected continentalscale network of dynamic components. These include everything from central-station thermal and hydro power plants to end-use loads. The natural uncontrolled responses to disturbances are oscillatory, and swings in voltage and power flows are evident in data from disturbances. Specific control systems are used to damp these natural oscillations that otherwise can result in large-scale blackouts. In order to design and tune controllers it is imperative to understand and anticipate the oscillations, and to develop high fidelity models that can represent this behavior.

In this seminar we focus on the modal analysis of power system data to study oscillations for three purposes:

1. Better the understanding of the oscillations actually present in the grid. (Off-line engineering analysis.)
2. Validation of models used to study the grid. (Operational Planning.)
3. Improve situational awareness by tracking system modes in real-time. (Operations.)

We will provide examples of oscillations observed in the grid in the context of these three objectives. We review the industry standard approaches for power system modal analysis and highlight their shortcomings in practice. They often require preprocessing the data, fine-tuning in model order, and give inconsistent results with related data sets. We suggest that the main attraction of these established methods is that they are computationally easy to use; the calculations require linear algebra. Based on our experience and dissatisfaction with these methods, we explore the use of nonlinear fitting techniques to estimate modes from data. With current computing power, computational barriers are low, and we show excellent results using a variable projection method.

Our method is currently in use by some power engineers to characterize observed oscillations in the West. We show results of using modal analysis to aid in power plant model validation. We discuss and present initial results for adapting our method to estimating modal behavior from ambient data in the grid, which is the focus of our on-going research in this area.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 270

Circuitry underlying robust perception and memory

Topic: 
Circuitry underlying robust perception and memory
Abstract / Description: 

The nervous system is a surprisingly noisy place. For example, if one presents the exact same stimulus to an animal many times, and records the activities of their sensory neurons, those neural responses typically show high levels of trial-to-trial variability. At the same time, we have the experience of having robust thoughts and perceptions. How do our brains generate this robustness from systems of individually unreliable components? In my talk, I will discuss three major circuit mechanisms that have been advanced by my research program. First, I will discuss a mechanism through which the nervous system can learn the statistical structure of the stimuli that it typically experiences. This knowledge allows for the nervous system to make educated guesses about the most likely stimulus presented, even when that stimulus is corrupted by noise. The de-noising process works best when the stimuli, and the noise that corrupts them, have different statistical structures. This motivates the second principle that I will discuss, namely that the peripheral nervous system can shape its noise statistics such that the noise only minimally interferes with the transmission of information about the external world. In particular, I will present a circuit mechanism through which the retina appears to perform this noise shaping. Finally, I will confront the fact that neural systems (like those involved in memory) must typically maintain stable representations even while the responses of individual neurons evolve dynamically over time, and are noisy. Using modern data-science tools, I will illustrate a novel mechanism through which the hippocampus appears to solve this problem. In addition to the importance of these circuit mechanisms for basic science, I will highlight in my talk the implications of my work for the creation of useful biomimetic technologies.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Venue: 
Clark, S360

EE Distinguished Lecture: Will Clean Energy Take Our Economy to the Cleaners?

Topic: 
Will Clean Energy Take Our Economy to the Cleaners?
Abstract / Description: 

In 2009 when the Obama-Biden ticket was inaugurated into office, they set out to accomplish the following aspirational goals:

  • Implement an economy-wide cap and trade systems to reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 83% of 2005 levels by 2050;
  • Save more oil than we import from the Middle East and Venezuela by 2019;
  • Ensure 10% of our electricity comes from renewables in 2012 and 25% by 2025;
  • Put one million Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles on the road by 2015;
  • Create five million jobs by investing $150 bn over ten years to catalyze private efforts to build a clean-energy future.

And in the 2011 State of the Union address, the President put forth a goal to reach 80% clean electricity by 2035. The Office of the Under Secretary for Energy at the US Department of Energy put together a plan to realize these goals, along with the cost of attaining 80% clean electricity by 2035. In this talk, I will summarize this plan, called the "Strategic Technology Energy Plan (STEP)" as well highlight the unique role of run-of-river and pumped storage hydropower in STEP.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Exciton-Polariton based Photonic Circuits

Topic: 
Exciton-Polariton based Photonic Circuits
Abstract / Description: 

Exciton-Polaritons in semiconductor microcavities are hybrid states of light and matter exhibiting a mix of electronic and photonic properties [1], including strong nonlinearity, low dephasing, ultrafast dynamics, sensitivity to electric and magnetic fields and a rich spin dynamics. These properties are ideal for the construction of a new generation of polaritonic information processing devices, such as exciton-polariton based circuits [2].

For such applications, attention is needed to overcome disorder in the system. Here, advances in the patterning of polariton potentials [3] are theoretically expected to allow for topological polaritons [4]. In analogy to photonic topological insulators [5], propagation immune to scattering with disorder is predicted.

In this presentation, I will also show preliminary work in the application of exciton-polaritons in unconventional circuit architectures such as neural networks [6].

Finally, I will consider the enhancement of nonlinear polaritonic effects at the quantum level with a viewpoint toward triggered single-photon emission [7].

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 25, 2015 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

GSEE Afternoon Tea

Topic: 
EE community event
Abstract / Description: 

Take a break this Wednesday afternoon to enjoy some beverages, snacks, and conversation!

All members of the EE community - students, faculty, and staff - are welcome.

Don't forget to bring a reusable mug if you have one. Hope to see you there!

 

- Hosted by GSEE

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard Kitchen, 2nd floor

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