EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

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Graduate

Beyond prosthetics: brain-machine interfaces as common clinical tools

Topic: 
Beyond prosthetics: brain-machine interfaces as common clinical tools
Abstract / Description: 

To date, the scope of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) has largely been to restore lost function to people with paralysis stemming from conditions such as neurodegenerative disease and spinal cord injury. These systems interface with the brain using neurosurgically implanted electrodes, measure the voltage of individual and groups of neurons, and translate these measurements via a decoding algorithm to control an end effector such as a computer cursor. I will discuss work performed in preclinical rhesus models that led to the highest performing communication BMI demonstrated to date, as well as recent results of an ongoing clinical trial where these preclinical algorithmic innovations have been successfully translated to a human participant, again yielding the highest communication rates of any known clinical BMI.

The example of prosthetics is just one important application leveraging intracortical BMIs as a platform for accurately assessing and acting on the neural state. However, these measurements could play a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of neurological and psychiatric diseases and disorders, ranging from stroke and epilepsy to depression and unconsciousness. Just as EEG recordings help localize seizures both temporally and spatially, and MRI imaging provides morphological and gross functional evaluations of the brain, BMI measurements may reveal previously unrecognized disease-specific adulterations in the neural state. Not only could this aid in forming better prognoses, but may also lead to interventions to prevent or alleviate undesirable symptoms and improve rehabilitation. In this manner, the utility of BMIs could extend far beyond communication or motor prosthetics to become an indispensable clinical tool in the treatment of brain disorders. I will discuss the emerging potential and key initial steps of this new class of medical system.


Event is sponsored by the Department of Neurosciences Institute and Bioengineering. View Event on Stanford Neuro Institute.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 10:00am to 11:00am
Venue: 
Clark Center Auditorium

SystemX Seminar: Energy Efficiency and Conversion in 1D and 2D Electronics

Topic: 
Energy Efficiency and Conversion in 1D and 2D Electronics
Abstract / Description: 

We review our recent studies concerning the heterogeneous integration of nanomaterials for low-power electronics and energy harvesting applications. Through careful transport studies of two-dimensional (2D) devices based on graphene and MoS2, we have uncovered details regarding their physical properties and band structure. We have investigated thermoelectric effects in graphene transistors and phase-change memory (PCM) elements for low-power electronics. We found that low-power transistors and memory could be enhanced by built-in thermoelectric effects which are particularly pronounced at nanometer length scales. We have also examined energy harvesting using composites based on one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes, and uncovered both the lower (diffusive) and upper (ballistic) limits of heat flow in 1D and 2D nanomaterials. Our results suggest fundamental limits and new applications that could be achieved through the co-design and heterogeneous integration of 1D and 2D nanomaterials.


The SystemX Alliance: a new forum for university-industry knowledge exchange.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: Optimization Techniques for Alphabet-Constrained Signal Design

Topic: 
Optimization Techniques for Alphabet-Constrained Signal Design
Abstract / Description: 

The theoretical and computational results in the field of signal design have been of interest to both engineers and mathematicians in the last decades. Signal optimization for active sensing and communications usually deals with various measures of quality (including estimation/detection and information-theoretic criteria), and moreover, the practical condition that the employed signals must belong to a limited signal set. Such diversity of design metrics and signal constraints paves the way for many interesting research works in signal optimization. We study the latest techniques facilitating signal design for optimized actuation, sensing, and communication over constrained sets. In particular, we focus on three different methodologies:

  • Alternating Projections on Converging Sets (ALPS-CS) -- an alternating projections-based approach specialized for constrained alphabets;
  • Power Method-Like Iterations -- a fast approach for alphabet-constrained signal design that resembles power method; and a
  • Monotonically Error-Bound Improving Technique for Optimization (MERIT)-- a novel optimization framework that lays the ground for obtaining computational data-dependent sub-optimality guarantees for the obtained solutions. The new guarantees typically outperform the a priori known guarantees of semidefinite relaxation (SDR) -- a widely used approach for constrained signal design
Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: Dynamic Code Optimization and the NVIDIA Denver Processor

Topic: 
Dynamic Code Optimization and the NVIDIA Denver Processor
Abstract / Description: 

VIDIA's first 64-bit ARM processor, code-named Denver, leverages a host of new technologies to enable high-performance mobile computing. Implemented in a 28-nm process, the Denver CPU can attain clock speeds of up to 2.5 GHz. This talk will outline the Denver architecture and describe some of its technological innovations. In particular this talk will discuss some of the motivations and advantages of dynamic code optimization.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

GSEE Afternoon Tea

Topic: 
EE community event
Abstract / Description: 

Take a break this Wednesday afternoon to enjoy some beverages, snacks, and conversation! All members of the EE community - students, faculty, and staff - are welcome. Don't forget to bring a reusable mug if you have one.

Hope to see you there!

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 2nd Floor lounge

Information Systems Lab Colloquium: Collective computation in nonlinear networks and the grammar of evolvability

Topic: 
Collective computation in nonlinear networks and the grammar of evolvability
Abstract / Description: 

Computation, synchronization, and control are key issues in complex networks. Vast nonlinear networks are encountered in biology, for instance, and in neuroscience, where for most tasks the human brain grossly outperforms engineered algorithms using computational elements 7 orders of magnitude slower than their artificial counterparts. We show that nonlinear systems tools, such as contraction analysis and virtual dynamical systems, yield simple but highly non-intuitive insights about such issues, and that they also suggest systematic mechanisms to build progressively more refined networks and novel algorithms through stable accumulation of functional building blocks and motifs.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

IT-Forum: Searching with measurement dependent noise

Topic: 
Searching with measurement dependent noise
Abstract / Description: 

We consider a search problem in which a target is arbitrarily placed on the unit interval. To acquire the target, any region of the interval can be probed for its presence, but the associated measurement noise increases with the size of the probed region. We are interested in the expected search time required to find the target to within some given resolution and error probability. When the measurement noise is constant (independent of the probed region), this problem is known to be equivalent to standard channel coding with feedback. We characterize the optimal tradeoff between time and resolution (i.e., maximal rate), and show that in contrast to the case of constant measurement noise, measurement dependent noise incurs a multiplicative gap between adaptive search and non-adaptive search. Moreover, our adaptive scheme attains the optimal rate-reliability tradeoff. An extension of this problem into a multi-target setting is also considered. We highlight the equivalence of this extension to coding for a certain multiple access channel and the optimal rate, as a function of the number of targets, is characterized. Finally, we show that as the number of targets increases, the performance gap between adaptive- and non-adaptive search becomes negligible. This talk is based on joint work with Ofer Shayevitz and Tara Javidi.

Date and Time: 
Friday, March 6, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

MEMS-in-TEM for in-situ Nano Electromechanical Testing and High-Performance Energy Harvesters using Ionic Liquid

Topic: 
MEMS-in-TEM for in-situ Nano Electromechanical Testing and High-Performance Energy Harvesters using Ionic Liquid
Abstract / Description: 

My research group has investigated MEMS fabrication and actuators since 1986. Recently, we inserted and operated MEMS devices in the specimen chamber of the transmission electron microscope (TEM). We conducted in situ TEM observation of the tensile and shear testing of nano junctions between two sharp tips. The tensile testing of a silicon junction of a few nm in diameter showed its extraordinary large plastic deformation. The shear deformation of a silver nano junction exhibited series of sub-nm steps correlated well with the crystalline spacing along an easy-to-slide plane; we may call those steps an atomic-scale stick-slip. Furthermore, we found the heat transfer through a short and thin, both in a few nm, silicon junction was much higher than the bulk value because of ballistic heat transfer. Also we have built a MEMS liquid cell in which the growth of a gold electrode by electroplating was observed in real time. We propose a high power-output vibrational energy harvesting based on ionic liquid. Ionic liquid enables very large capacitance (1.0-10 μF cm-2) on the electrode at bias voltage less than 1.9 V due to its extremely thin (~ 1 nm) electrical double layer. By mechanical squeezing and drawing the ionic liquid, that was solidified with a polymer additive, between a pair of electrodes at 15 Hz, we stably obtained the current output of 22 μAp-p cm-2 at 1.5 V.

Date and Time: 
Friday, March 6, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

Dependable VLSI Platform with Variability and Soft-Error Resilience

Topic: 
Dependable VLSI Platform with Variability and Soft-Error Resilience
Abstract / Description: 

Extreme scaling imposes enormous challenges, such as increased variability and soft-error vulnerability, on the resilience of VLSI circuits and systems. For coping with those threats, we have been developing a VLSI platform that can realize a dependable circuit with required level of reliability. The platform achieves variability resilience at circuit-level by on-chip performance monitoring and variability compensation by localized body biasing. Architecture-level resilience to soft-errors is accommodated in a mixed-grained reconfigurable array that can configure functionality and reliability as well. Those properties have been experimentally verified by proof-of-concept chips fabricated in a 65nm process. Overview of the dependable VLSI platform with emphasis on the variability and soft-error resilience will be explained.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 415

Electronics Meets Pharmaceuticals: Getting the Most out of Every Pill

Topic: 
Electronics Meets Pharmaceuticals: Getting the Most out of Every Pill
Abstract / Description: 

The practice of medicine didn't evolve for thousands of years. Starting about 100 years ago during the great influenza pandemic, the optical microscope ushered in a century of technological innovation in medicine that continues to cure disease and improve and extend the lives of millions of people. Better microscopes, such as CAT, MRI & PET scanners, enabled accurate diagnosis; pharmaceuticals tested using the scientific method gave doctors therapies to treat formerly incurable disease. Today, the study of genomics continues to revolutionize biochemistry, while mobile technology will bring these miracles to everyone, everywhere.

This presentation will first review a framework of innovation within the intersection of healthcare and mobile technology. Examples will show how mobile devices are reducing the cost and improving the performance of healthcare in the developed world while bringing modern miracles to underdeveloped regions. Proteus Digital Health® has combined electronics and pharmaceuticals to create digital medicines and wearable physiologic sensors.

The Proteus method can provide insights into medication taking behaviors and a patient's physiological response that will enable clinicians to make more informed therapeutic decisions and have evidence-based discussions with their patients on how best to approach management of their condition. By providing information to differentiate between non-response and nonadherence, the Proteus technique optimizes therapy costs (i.e. avoid unnecessary therapy changes and escalation to higher cost drugs) and use of medical resources (i.e. prevent unnecessary specialist referrals and costly complications), facilitating efficient progression through the recommended treatment pathway, and advancing patients towards their treatment goals. In the developing world, digital medicines will target the scourge of counterfeit medicines, which contaminate roughly half of Africa's supply chain.

The Proteus Patch, Ingestible Sensor, and related software will be presented. The Proteus Patch is a wearable data-logger for ambulatory recording of physiological metrics such as heart rate, activity, body angle relative to gravity, and time-stamped events, including events signaled by swallowing the Ingestible Sensor. Data from eleven clinical studies involving 492 subjects and ingestion of 20,993 ingestible sensors will be summarized.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium

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