EE Student Information

The Department of Electrical Engineering supports Black Lives Matter. Read more.

• • • • •

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Graduate

Special Seminar: "Pathfinding DTCO: Quantifying Challenges and Opportunities beyond the End of Pitch Scaling"

Topic: 
Pathfinding DTCO: Quantifying Challenges and Opportunities beyond the End of Pitch Scaling
Abstract / Description: 

Fueled by higher bandwidth wireless communication and ubiquitous AI, the demand for more affordable and power efficient transistors is accelerating at a time when Dennard scaling is undeniably crawling to a halt. While the enormous complexity of leading edge technology nodes has been achieved incrementally over time by deliberately limiting each technology node to mostly small evolutionary steps, far more disruptive device and interconnect innovations are necessary to achieve meaningful power-performance-area-cost (PPAC) improvement as we approach the fundamental device-physics and material-science limits of dimensional scaling. The complexity versus benefit tradeoffs of innovative 3-dimensional device architectures with non-standard power-distribution networks are so hard to quantify that rigorous yet efficient prototyping becomes indispensable even prior to committing wafer fabrication equipment R&D resources. In this talk we will present our work on developing a purpose-built suite of tools to vastly accelerate the quantitative pre-screening and optimization of technology options to help the industry maintain its relentless pace of PPAC scaling and to give TEL a leg up in identifying new process challenges and tool innovation opportunities. This presentation will cover the three main components of our pathfinding DTCO flow:

  • Standard Cells for DTCO Pathfinding (Lars Liebmann)
  • Extraction, Characterization, Circuit Simulation (Daniel Chanemougame)
  • Synthesis, Place-and-Route, STCO (Paul Gutwin)
Date and Time: 
Monday, October 5, 2020 - 4:10pm to 5:10pm
Venue: 
Zoom ID: 960 8703 6899; +password

SCIEN and EE292E present "Computational Imaging, One Photon at a Time"

Topic: 
Computational Imaging, One Photon at a Time
Abstract / Description: 

Single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are an emerging sensor technology capable of detecting and time-tagging individual photons with picosecond precision. Despite (or perhaps, due to) these capabilities, SPADs are considered specialized devices suitable only for photon-starved scenarios, and restricted to a limited set of niche applications. This raises the following questions: Can SPADs operate not just in low light, but in bright scenes as well? Can SPADs be used not just with precisely controlled active light sources such as pulsed lasers, but under passive, uncontrolled illumination like cellphone or machine vision cameras?
I will describe our recent work on designing computational imaging techniques that (a) enable single-photon sensors to operate across the entire gamut of imaging conditions including high-flux scenes, and (b) leverages SPADs as passive imaging devices for ultra-low light photography. The overall goal is to transform SPADs into all-weather, general-purpose sensors capable of both active and passive imaging, across photon-starved and photon-flooded environments.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Registration required

AP 483 Seminar presents "Resolving starlight: a quantum perspective"

Topic: 
Resolving starlight: a quantum perspective
Abstract / Description: 

The wave-particle duality of light introduces two fundamental problems to imaging, namely, the diffraction limit and the photon shot noise. Quantum information theory can tackle them both in one holistic formalism: model the light as a quantum object, consider any quantum measurement, and pick the one that gives the best statistics. While Helstrom pioneered the theory half a century ago and first applied it to incoherent imaging, it was not until recently that the approach offered a genuine surprise on the age-old topic by predicting a new class of superior imaging methods. For the resolution of two sub-Rayleigh sources, the new methods have been shown theoretically and experimentally to outperform direct imaging and approach the true quantum limits. Recent efforts to generalize the theory for an arbitrary number of sources suggest that, despite the existence of harsh quantum limits, the quantum-inspired methods can still offer significant improvements over direct imaging for subdiffraction objects, potentially benefiting many applications in astronomy as well as fluorescence microscopy.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 16, 2020 - 4:15pm

AP 483 Seminar presents "Correlated photon physics in mesoscopic atomic chains"

Topic: 
Correlated photon physics in mesoscopic atomic chains
Abstract / Description: 

Tightly packed ordered arrays of atoms (or, more generally, quantum emitters) exhibit remarkable collective optical properties, as dissipation in the form of photon emission is correlated. In this talk, I will discuss the single-, few- and many-body out-of-equilibrium physics of 1D arrays, and their potential to realize versatile light-matter interfaces. For small enough inter-atomic distances, atomic chains feature dark states that allow for dissipationless transport of photons, behaving as waveguides for single-photon states. Atomic waveguides can be used to mediate interactions between impurity qubits coupled to the array, and allow for the realization of multiple paradigms in waveguide QED, from bandgap physics to chiral quantum optics [1]. Due to the two-level nature of the atoms, atomic waveguides are a perfect playground to realize strong photon-photon interactions. At the many-body level, I will address the open question of how the geometry of the array impacts the process of "Dicke superradiance", where fully inverted atoms synchronize as they de-excite, emitting light in a burst (in contrast to the exponential decay expected from independent emitters). While most literature attributes the quenching of superradiance to Hamiltonian dipole-dipole interactions, the actual culprits are dissipative processes in the form of photon emission into different optical modes. I will provide an understanding of the physics in terms of collective jump operators and demonstrate that superradiance survives at small inter-atomic distances [2]. I will finish my talk by discussing the implications of correlated photon emission for quantum information processing and metrology.

[1] S. J. Masson, A. Asenjo-Garcia, Atomic-waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics, arXiv: 1912.06234 (2019)

[2] S. J. Masson, I. Ferrier-Barbut, L. A. Orozco, A. Browaeys, A. Asenjo-Garcia, Many-body signatures of collective decay in atomic chains, arXiv: 2008.08139 (2020)


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 9, 2020 - 4:15pm

AP 483 Seminar presents "Benchmarking quantum computers and future directions for superconducting quantum hardware"

Topic: 
Benchmarking quantum computers and future directions for superconducting quantum hardware
Abstract / Description: 

While the fully fault-tolerant universal quantum computing system is still many years ahead, building an early quantum computer with quantum advantage becomes a feasible near-term milestone that we can realistically plan. Increasing number of near-term applications has been accelerating the development of quantum hardware in the industries, and as quantum system size grows, we need a whole system metric to evaluate the level of hardware performance. I would like to introduce the quantum volume (arXiv:1811.12926 and more recently arXiv:2008.08571) as a system-level metric that quantifies quantum computational power of early quantum computing processors. The quantum volume depends on various individual component metrics such as gate fidelity and crosstalk. I will discuss some of the challenges in building superconducting quantum hardware and suggest few directions to improve the quantum volume.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 2, 2020 - 4:15pm

AP 483 Seminar presents "Quantum Technologies Enabled by Cavity-Optomechanics at Low Temperatures"

Topic: 
Quantum Technologies Enabled by Cavity-Optomechanics at Low Temperatures
Abstract / Description: 

The ability to fabricate devices that demonstrate quantum behavior, as opposed to being restricted to what nature has given us, has opened up the possibility of technologies based on the laws of quantum physics instead of classical physics. The prime example of this is the superconducting qubit at the core of a quantum processor. Another class of fabricated devices that are beginning to demonstrate quantum behavior is that of nanoscale mechanical resonators. Such devices promise force and torque sensors operating at or beyond the standard quantum limit, and novel technologies such as quantum-level wavelength transducers. I will tell you about our efforts to develop such technologies and some of the fun physics we have uncovered along the way.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 26, 2020 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Zoom

AP 483 Seminar presents "Organic small molecule integrated photonics"

Topic: 
Organic small molecule integrated photonics
Abstract / Description: 

The initial, landmark integrated photonic devices relied on silicon and III-V materials, and recent advances in material fabrication and deposition methods have enabled a plethora of new technologies based on materials with higher optical nonlinearities, including 2D materials and organic polymers. However, nonlinear optical (NLO) organic small molecules have not experienced similar growth due to a perceived environmental instability and to challenges related to intra and intermolecular interactions. Because NLO small molecules have NLO coefficients that are orders of magnitude larger than conventional optical materials, developing strategies to fabricate optical devices could enable significant performance improvements. In recent work, we combined conventional top-down fabrication methods with bottom-up techniques to develop on-chip devices that incorporated NLO optical small molecules. These hybrid systems provide access to optical behavior and performance not attainable with conventional material systems. In this seminar, I will discuss a couple examples of NLO small molecule integrated resonators, including Raman lasers and all optically-switchable devices.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 19, 2020 - 4:15pm

AP 483 Seminar presents "Spin-photon interfaces for quantum networks"

Topic: 
Spin-photon interfaces for quantum networks
Abstract / Description: 

Spin-photon interfaces augmented with auxiliary qubits are prime candidates for quantum repeater nodes. I will present our theoretical work toward the realization of practical quantum repeaters, focusing on the triggered generation of highly entangled photonic (graph) states from a spin-photon interface and their performance-resource tradeoff in a network. I will also discuss our quantum control work on the selective high-fidelity control of a nuclear spin register coupled to an NV center spin in diamond.


This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 12, 2020 - 4:15pm

AP 483 Seminar presents "A Renaissance in Brillouin scattering"

Topic: 
A Renaissance in Brillouin scattering
Abstract / Description: 

Brillouin scattering was for many years confined to experiments in hundreds of metres of optical fibre, in which the spectrum was fixed and where Brillouin properties were almost identical to those of bulk materials. A recent renaissance in Brillouin scattering research has been driven by the increasing maturity of photonic integration platforms as well as advances in nanophotonics and nonlinear optics. A central problem to be solved in integrated applications has been the simultaneous confinement of the optical and acoustic waves. Traditional silicon nanowires confine light but do not confine sound and the group IV semiconductors are typically very stiff so that rib waveguides do not guide elastic waves. A first solution to the confinement problem, and the first demonstration of SBS in an integrated photonic environment, was found in the chalcogenide soft glass platform, where the high refractive index and low stiffness of As2Se3 glass allowed for confinement of both optical and elastic waves by total internal reflection, leading to strong Brillouin gain and a multitude of application possibilities. I will review the diverse array of strategies that have been used to enhance and shape Brillouin interactions within integrated photonic waveguide systems, as well as some of the goals and motivations of the growing field of integrated Brillouin photonics with particular emphasis on my group's research on developing compact microwave photonic functions.


 

This seminar is sponsored by the department of Applied Physics and the Ginzton Laboratory.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 5, 2020 - 4:15pm

Workshop in Biostatistics presents "Interpretability and Human Validation of Machine Learning"

Topic: 
Interpretability and Human Validation of Machine Learning
Abstract / Description: 

As machine learning systems become ubiquitous, there is a growing interest in interpretable machine learning -- that is, systems that can provide human-interpretable rationale for their predictions and decisions. In this talk, I'll first give examples of why interpretability is needed in some of our work in machine learning for health, discussing how human input (which would be impossible without interpretability) is crucial for getting past fundamental limits of statistical validation. Next, I'll speak about some of the work we are doing to understand interpretability more broadly: what exactly is interpretability, and how can we assess it? By formalizing these notions, we can hope to identify universals of interpretability and also rigorously compare different kinds of systems for producing algorithmic explanations. Includes joint work with Been Kim, Andrew Ross, Mike Wu, Michael Hughes, Menaka Narayanan, Sam Gershman, Emily Chen, Jeffrey He, Isaac Lage, Roy Perlis, Tom McCoy, Gabe Hope, Leah Weiner, Erik Sudderth, Sonali Parbhoo, Marzyeh Ghassemi, Pete Szolovits, Mornin Feng, Leo Celi, Nicole Brimmer, Tristan Naumann, Rohit Joshi, Anna Rumshisky, Omer Gottesman, Emma Brunskill, Yao Liu, Sonali Parbhoo, Joe Futoma, and the Berkman Klein Center.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 2:30pm

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Graduate