Graduate

SCIEN Talk, eWear seminar: 'Immersive Technology and AI' with focus on mobile AR research

Topic: 
'Immersive Technology and AI' with focus on mobile AR research
Abstract / Description: 

Talk Title: Saliency in VR: How Do People Explore Virtual Environments,presented by Vincent Sitzmann

Understanding how people explore immersive virtual environments is crucial for many applications, such as designing virtual reality (VR) content, developing new compression algorithms, or learning computational models of saliency or visual attention. Whereas a body of recent work has focused on modeling saliency in desktop viewing conditions, VR is very different from these conditions in that viewing behavior is governed by stereoscopic vision and by the complex interaction of head orientation, gaze, and other kinematic constraints. To further our understanding of viewing behavior and saliency in VR, we capture and analyze gaze and head orientation data of 169 users exploring stereoscopic, static omni-directional panoramas, for a total of 1980 head and gaze trajectories for three different viewing conditions. We provide a thorough analysis of our data, which leads to several important insights, such as the existence of a particular fixation bias, which we then use to adapt existing saliency predictors to immersive VR conditions. In addition, we explore other applications of our data and analysis, including automatic alignment of VR video cuts, panorama thumbnails, panorama video synopsis, and saliency-based compression.

Talk Title: "Immersive Technology and AI" with focus on mobile AR research

Abstract: not available

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 31, 2018 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: GW170817: Hearing and Seeing a Binary Neutron Star Merger

Topic: 
GW170817: Hearing and Seeing a Binary Neutron Star Merger
Abstract / Description: 

With the discovery of GW170817 in gravitational waves, and the discovery of an associated short gamma-ray burst, and the discovery of an associated optical afterglow, we have finally entered the era of gravitational-wave multi-messenger astronomy. We will discuss LIGO/Virgo's detection of this binary coalescence and focus on some of the scientific implications, including insight into the origin of gold and platinum in the universe, tests of black holes and general relativity, elucidation of the formation mechanisms for black holes and neutron stars, and the first standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: Artificial Intelligence: Current and Future Paradigms and Implications

Topic: 
Artificial Intelligence: Current and Future Paradigms and Implications
Abstract / Description: 

Artificial intelligence has advanced rapidly in the last five years. This talk intends to provide high level answers to questions like:

  • What can the evolution of intelligence in the animal kingdom teach us about the evolution of AI?
  • How should people who are not AI researchers view the societal transformation that is now underway? What are some of the social, economic, and political implications of this technology as it exists now?
  • What will future AI systems likely be capable of, and what are the largest expected impacts of these systems?

The talk will be understandable for non-computer scientists.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 30, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

US-ATMC (EE402) Seminar: New Trends Among Asia-focused Accelerators — Incubating at a Distance

Topic: 
New Trends Among Asia-focused Accelerators — Incubating at a Distance
Abstract / Description: 

New Trends Among Asia-focused Accelerators — Incubating at a Distance

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Skilling Auditorium, 494 Lomita Mall

IEEE SCV-WIE presents Career Panel Talk: Advising My Younger Self

Topic: 
Career Panel Talk: Advising My Younger Self
Abstract / Description: 

The event will start with Career Perspectives from women who hold varied experiences both in industry and academia, facilitated by an IEEE-SCV-WIE Board Member and continue with the Q&A. The focus of the panel discussion will be around how to begin and maintain a passionate career track

Please register

  • Moderator: Karen Horovitz, IEEE-SCV-WIE Board
  • Panelists: Kitty Yeung, Liliane Peters, Mayuri Kulkarni, Patsy Price, and Sneha Prasad
Date and Time: 
Friday, May 25, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

SmartGrid Seminar: Trends in Electric Power Distribution System Analysis at PNNL

Topic: 
Trends in Electric Power Distribution System Analysis at PNNL
Abstract / Description: 

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) originated and continues to maintain one of the two leading open-source distribution system simulators, called GridLAB-D, which has been downloaded 80,000+ times world-wide. While it continues to improve core functionality, PNNL is placing more emphasis recently on GridLAB-D as part of a development platform, improving its interoperability and opening the software up to more customization by researchers. This talk will cover two ongoing open-source development projects, funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, that incorporate and extend GridLAB-D. One of these projects is also expected to contribute distribution feeder model conversion tools for a new California Energy Commission project headed by SLAC. Highlights of the talk will include:

  • Transactive energy simulation platform, at tesp.readthedocs.io/en/latest
  • GridAPPS-D application development platform, at gridappsd.readthedocs.io/en/latest
  • Evole GridLAB-D's co-simulation support from FNCS interface, to a multi-lab interface called HELICS compliant with Functional Mockup Interface (FMI): https://github.com/GMLC-TDC/HELICS-src
  • Leveraging new capabilities for large-building simulation in JModelica, power flow analysis in OpenDSS, and transactive energy system agents in Python
  • Implementation and use of the Common Information Model (CIM) in a NoSQL triple-store database for standardized feeder model conversion
  • Comparison of different types of stochastic modeling for load and distributed energy resource (DER) output variability, and its impact on feeder model order reduction and state estimation
  • Special system protection example concerns on urban secondary networks with high penetration of DER
Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 1:30pm
Venue: 
Y2E2 111

Fully Autonomous Vehicles: Removing the Front-Seat Driver

Topic: 
Fully Autonomous Vehicles: Removing the Front-Seat Driver
Abstract / Description: 

The automotive industry is bracing for a new surge of progress and opportunity, with billions of dollars on the line. The potential is huge. People have been dreaming about owning a self-driving car for decades, and recent sales have shown that consumers are willing to spend big bucks for this dream.

The final push to widespread availability of fully autonomous vehicles has begun. Testing has moved onto public roads, and in the next few years, several vendors plan to release autonomous vehicles in limited-use "Level 4" situations (taxis, transit companies, fleet operations, freeway-only driving). As the technology advances from "assisted driving" to true self-driving, consumer-ready vehicles for general road travel (Level 5) will be tailgating right behind.

In this panel, industry-leading startups, entrepreneurs, and investors will explore the technologies and challenges related to realizing the dream of a fully autonomous self-driving vehicle — i.e. a vehicle that a human does not need to monitor and that can completely take over all driving responsibilities.

Panelists:
- Sterling Anderson, Co-Founder and Chief Product Officer, Aurora
Named "America's Hottest Self-Driving Startup" by Wired
- Alexei Andreev, Managing Director, Autotech Ventures
Focused on the $3T ground transportation sector
- Ivan Mihov, Director of Program Management, Zoox
Valued at over $1B by Crunchbase
- Rob Coneybeer, Managing Director, Shasta Ventures (Moderator)

FREE for Stanford ID holders. Registration required by 5/23. Please email  briana.burrows@stanford.edu  for a ticket.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

Social Entrepreneurship and Tech Innovation Advancing Sustainable Development Goals in South Asia

Topic: 
Social Entrepreneurship and Tech Innovation Advancing Sustainable Development Goals in South Asia
Abstract / Description: 

Panelists:
- Rikin Gandhi, Co-founder/Executive Director of Digital Green
- Radhika Shah, Co-President of Stanford Angels & Entrepreneurs
- Dr. Richard Dasher, Director of the US-Asia Technology Management Center (Moderator)

Rikin Gandhi is co-founder and executive director of Digital Green, a global development organization that empowers smallholder farmers to lift themselves out of poverty by harnessing the collective power of technology and grassroots-level partnerships. He began his career at Oracle, where he received patents for linguistic search algorithms that he helped develop. Later, he joined Microsoft Research India's Technology for Emerging Markets team, where he researched ways to amplify the effectiveness of agricultural development globally. While traveling around India's rural communities, Gandhi developed a passion for helping the country's rural farmers. That passion then became his career: in 2006, he co-founded what is now Digital Green. Gandhi holds a master's in aeronautical and astronautical space engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a bachelor's in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University.

Radhika Shah is Co-President of Stanford Angels & Entrepreneurs. She is an angel/impact tech investor also passionate about civic engagement, community building & transformative social change. She is an advisor to the Sustainable Development Goals Philanthropy Platform and Founding Chair of the Tech Advisory Group for Stanford Handa Center for Human Rights. She also sits on the International Advisory Network for Business and Human Rights Resource Centre. She is passionate about women's rights, education, social justice, environment since her childhood, growing up under the influence of the Gandhi Ashram in India. Radhika co-founded former Ashoka SV chapter, is on SV Leadership Council for Action for India, an advisor/mentor to CGNetSwara.org, Samasource.org.

See https://asia.stanford.edu/social-entrepreneurship-may-22-2018/ for details.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 22, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Skilling Auditorium, 494 Lomita Mall

ISL Colloquium: Finite Sample Guarantees for Control of an Unknown Linear Dynamical System

Topic: 
Finite Sample Guarantees for Control of an Unknown Linear Dynamical System
Abstract / Description: 

In principle, control of a physical system is accomplished by first deriving a faithful model of the underlying dynamics from first principles, and then solving an optimal control problem with the modeled dynamics. In practice, the system may be too complex to precisely characterize, and an appealing alternative is to instead collect trajectories of the system and fit a model of the dynamics from the data. How many samples are needed for this to work? How sub-optimal is the resulting controller?

In this talk, I will shed light on these questions when the underlying dynamical system is linear and the control objective is quadratic, a classic optimal control problem known as the Linear Quadratic Regulator. Despite the simplicity of linear dynamical systems, deriving finite-time guarantees for both system identification and controller performance is non-trivial. I will first talk about our results in the "one-shot" setting, where measurements are collected offline, a model is estimated from the data, and a controller is synthesized using the estimated model with confidence bounds. Then, I will discuss our recent work on guarantees in the online regret setting, where noise injected into the system for learning the dynamics needs to trade-off with state regulation.

This talk is based on joint work with Sarah Dean, Horia Mania, Nikolai Matni, and Benjamin Recht.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: The IceCube Neutrino Observatory and the Beginning of Neutrino Astrophysics

Topic: 
The IceCube Neutrino Observatory and the Beginning of Neutrino Astrophysics
Abstract / Description: 

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the world's largest neutrino detector, instrumenting a cubic kilometer of ice at the geographic South Pole. IceCube was designed to detect high-energy astrophysical neutrinos from potential cosmic ray acceleration sites such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and supernova remnants. IceCube announced the detection of a diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos in 2013, including the highest energy neutrinos ever detected. The sources of these neutrinos are as yet unknown, and IceCube continues to collect data and to collaborate with multi messenger partners in order to explore the neutrino sky. I will discuss the latest results from IceCube and discuss prospects for future upgrades and expansions of the detector.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 22, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

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