EE Student Information

Graduate

Next Generation Cybersecurity in the Enterprise

Topic: 
Next Generation Cybersecurity in the Enterprise
Abstract / Description: 

The whack-a-mole approach to security is not working; we needed to change the mindset from following the attacker to following the code: the root to solving the security problem is preventing unauthorized code from attackers or other third-parties from running on applications. Protecting the integrity of an application, in real-time, is becoming a minimum requirement to ensuring the security of every enterprise. But how? When implementing real-time application monitoring policies, there are typically two major pain points: policy creation and policy maintenance and flexibility. This session will detail different approaches about how to tackle these pain points to provide the next-generation of application security. Specifically, the talk will dive into the question of how to monitor an application at runtime protecting it against fileless attacks while doing so in a practical manner. The next- generation of application runtime security needs to be deterministic, yet flexible enough to adapt the real-time behavior of the application.


Sponsorship:
Santa Clara Valley Chapter of the IEEE Information Theory Society
Santa Clara Valley Chapter of the IEEE Computer Society

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 6:00pm

AP/P Colloquium: Finding Beauty: The role of lattice QCD in high energy physics

Topic: 
Finding Beauty: The role of lattice QCD in high energy physics
Abstract / Description: 

Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions, is a beautifully simple quantum field theory which describes an extraordinary range of complex phenomena. A tour of the main features of QCD is followed by an introduction to lattice field theory, a nonperturbative approach to quantifying QCD effects. I will discuss the current status of lattice QCD calculations with a focus on results that are essential for unlocking the discovery potential of high energy experiments at the precision frontier.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 200 + Zoom

Electronic Systems Technology Seminar Talk: Enabling Next-Generation Nitride-Based Materials and Devices

Topic: 
Enabling Next-Generation Nitride-Based Materials and Devices
Abstract / Description: 

Nitrides form a fascinating class of functional materials, though are still largely unexplored due to stringent synthesis constraints. For example, of the 447 computationally predicted thermodynamically stable ternary nitrides less than half have been synthesized. Even for the simpler binary nitrides, single crystal synthesis is demanding and constraint by the relative ease of their decomposition at elevated temperature.

Group-III nitrides, including In1-xGaxN, Al1-xGaxN, and cubic/hexagonal BN, are of scientific and technological interest in part due to their advantageous intrinsic materials properties: (ultra-) wide band gap, radiation hardness, extreme thermal conductivity, and mechanical hardness. Important applications include optoelectronic (IR through UV) and power electronic (e.g. high-power, high-frequency) devices. Critical to high-performance, high-efficiency device operation is the availability of large-area, high-quality single crystal substrates or boules, though these are expense and small at best and non-existent at worst. Improved nitride synthesis approaches are needed to improve upon existing materials and enable new devices. Furthermore, to access new material compositions/phases and improve upon crystal quality for device applications, enhanced thin film synthesis approaches are needed.

This talk will discuss important advances made in the realm of single crystal nitride synthesis using the ammonothermal method enabling high growth rate, high transparency GaN boules, while simultaneously laying the groundwork to explore the bulk, single crystal growth of cubic BN, hexagonal BN and InN for the first time. Advances in the complementary development of a novel, thin film synthesis platform consisting of a high pressure spatial chemical vapor deposition tool (HPS-CVD) capable of operating up to 100 atm will be discussed using computational fluid dynamic modeling.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 16, 2021 - 1:00pm

SystemX Alliance presents "Choreorobotics: An Emerging Discipline"

Topic: 
Choreorobotics: An Emerging Discipline
Abstract / Description: 

Choreographers and roboticists both organize moving bodies in space, yet the platforms and practices they employ are seemingly dissimilar. This talk describes the emerging field of choreorobotics, from dancing robots to novel programming interfaces, and why the intersection of these artistic and engineering fields is rapidly expanding.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 5:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018 + Zoom

SoE Harvest Celebration for International Graduate Students

Topic: 
SoE Harvest Celebration for International Graduate Students
Abstract / Description: 

EE international graduate students,

The School of Engineering hosts a holiday celebration for international graduate students in engineering!

 

Food, drink, and games will be provided.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 23, 2021 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
Venue: 
Huang Amphitheater

ISL Colloquium: Optimization in Theory and Practice

Topic: 
Optimization in Theory and Practice
Abstract / Description: 

Join us for coffee and snacks at 3:30pm in the Grove outside Packard (near Bytes' outdoor seating). This week's speaker will join us via Zoom, which will be screened in Packard 101, and streamed for those unable to attend in person.


Complexity analysis in optimization seeks upper bounds on the amount of work required to find approximate solutions of problems in a given class with a given algorithm, and also lower bounds, usually in the form of a worst-case example from a given problem class. The relationship between theoretical complexity bounds and practical performance of algorithms on "typical" problems varies widely across problem and algorithm classes, and relative interest among researchers between the theoretical and practical aspects of algorithm design and analysis has waxed and waned over the years. This talk surveys complexity analysis and its relationship to practical algorithms in optimization, with an emphasis on linear programming and convex and nonconvex nonlinear optimization, providing historical (and cultural) perspectives on research in these areas.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
Packard Grove / Packard 101

Q-FARM Seminar: Quantum criticality in transition metal dichalcogenides

Topic: 
Quantum criticality in transition metal dichalcogenides
Abstract / Description: 

I will discuss low temperature transport measurements on twisted bilayers of WSe2, where we see evidence for an electron-correlation driven insulating phase at half filling of the lowest moiré subband. I will then discuss how metal-insulator transitions can be driven in this system using gate voltages that tune doping and bandwidth. I will show evidence for the presence of a ring of quantum critical points in this system via the behavior of electron transport in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transitions. I will also describe generally the various types of disorder in moiré materials that we can image by microscopic measurements.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Physics & Astrophysics Building, Room 102/103

IT-Forum: Differentially Private Covariance-adaptive Mean Estimation

Topic: 
Differentially Private Covariance-adaptive Mean Estimation
Abstract / Description: 

Mean estimation in Mahalanobis distance is a fundamental problem in statistics: given i.i.d. samples from a high-dimensional distribution with unknown mean and covariance, the goal is to find an estimator with small Mahalanobis distance from the true mean. To protect the privacy of the individuals who participate in the dataset, we study statistical estimators which satisfy differential privacy, a condition that has become a standard criterion for individual privacy in statistics and machine learning.


We present two differentially private mean estimators for multivariate (sub)Gaussian distributions with unknown covariance. All previous estimators with the same accuracy guarantee in Mahalanobis loss either require strong a priori bounds on the covariance matrix or require that the number of samples grows superlinearly with the dimension of the data, which is suboptimal. Our algorithms achieve nearly optimal sample complexity (matching that of the known-covariance case) by adapting the noise added due to privacy to the distribution's covariance matrix, without explicitly estimating it.
Joint work with Gavin Brown, Marco Gaboardi, Adam Smith, Jonathan Ullman.

Date and Time: 
Friday, November 12, 2021 - 1:00pm

SystemX Alliance Virtual Fall Conference

Topic: 
SystemX Alliance Virtual Fall Conference
Abstract / Description: 

Day 1 - Monday, November 8 • (8:00am-1:00pm) Student Poster Sessions
Day 2 - Tuesday, November 9 • (9:00am-2:10pm) Plenary Talk by Department Chair, Focus Area Overviews, and Technical Sessions
Day 3 - Wednesday, November 10 • (9:15am-2:10pm) New Faculty Introductions, Focus Area Overviews, and Technical Sessions
Day 4 - Thursday, November 11 • (3:00pm-8:25pm) Focus Area Overviews and Technical Sessions

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 8, 2021 - 12:00am to Thursday, November 11, 2021 - 11:55pm

HAI virtual fall conference on Policy & AI

Topic: 
Four Radical Proposals for a Better Society
Abstract / Description: 

This year's virtual fall conference features a novel format. We will present and discuss four policy proposals that respond to the issues and opportunities created by artificial intelligence. Each policy proposal will be a radical challenge to the status quo and capable of having a significant and far-reaching positive impact on humanity. The proposals will be presented to a panel of experts from multiple disciplines and backgrounds, who will vet, debate, and judge the merits of each proposal. We will also encourage audience participation throughout.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 9, 2021 - 12:00am to Thursday, November 11, 2021 - 11:55pm

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