Graduate

ISL Colloquium presents Transportation Systems Resilience: Capacity-Aware Control and Value of Information

Topic: 
Transportation Systems Resilience: Capacity-Aware Control and Value of Information
Abstract / Description: 

Resilience of a transportation system is its ability to operate under adverse events like incidents and storms. Availability of real-time traffic data provides new opportunities for predicting travelers' routing behavior and implementing network control operations during adverse events. In this talk, we will discuss two problems: controlling highway corridors in response to disruptions and modeling strategic route choices of travelers with heterogeneous access to incident information. Firstly, we present an approach to designing control strategies for highway corridors facing stochastic capacity disruptions such random incidents and vehicle platoons/moving bottlenecks. We exploit the properties of traffic flow dynamics under recurrent incidents to derive verifiable conditions for stability of traffic queues, and also obtain guarantees on the system throughput. Secondly, we introduce a routing game in which travelers receive asymmetric and incomplete information about uncertain network state, and make route choices based on their private beliefs about the state and other travelers' behavior. We study the effects of information heterogeneity on travelers' equilibrium route choices and costs. Our analysis is useful for evaluating the value of receiving state information for travelers, which can be positive, zero, or negative in equilibrium. These results demonstrate the advantages of considering network state uncertainty in both strategic and operational aspects of system resilience.

Date and Time: 
Friday, November 30, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SystemX Seminar presents "Safe Control and Algorithmic Human-Robot Interaction"

Topic: 
Safe Control and Algorithmic Human-Robot Interaction
Abstract / Description: 

Dorsa Sadigh is an Assistant Professor in CS and EE.

Her work is focused on the design of algorithms for autonomous systems that safely and reliably interact with people.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Huang 018

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents "Safe passwords made easy to use"

Topic: 
Safe passwords made easy to use
Abstract / Description: 

How do we choose and remember our secure access codes? So far biometrics, password managers, and systems like Facebook connect have not been able to guarantee the security we need. Remembering dozens of different passwords becomes a usability nightmare. 25+ years into online experience, each of us have many hard-to-remember or easy-to-guess passwords, with all the risks and frustration they imply.

We describe experiments showing how to make easy to remember codes and passwords and the system to make them, called Cue-Pin-Select. It can generate (and regenerate) passwords on the go using only the user's brain for computation. It has the advantage of creating memorable passwords, not requiring any external storage or computing device, and can be executed in less than a minute to create a new password.

This talk will summarize recent usable security work done with Ted Selker. It will start with the Cue-Pin-Select algorithm, cover an improvement we found that applies to all passphrase-based security systems, and explain some of the work currently underway to have better tools to study password schemes and human computation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

ISL Colloquium presents Deconstructing the Blockchain to Approach Physical Limits

Topic: 
Deconstructing the Blockchain to Approach Physical Limits
Abstract / Description: 

The concept of a blockchain was invented by Satoshi Nakamoto to maintain a distributed ledger for an electronic payment system, Bitcoin. In addition to its security, important performance measures of a blockchain protocol are its transaction throughput, confirmation latency and confirmation reliability. These measures are limited by two underlying physical network attributes: communication capacity and speed-of-light propagation delay. Existing systems operate far away from these physical limits. In this work we introduce Prism, a new blockchain protocol, which can provably achieve 1) security against up to 50% adversarial hashing power; 2) optimal throughput up to the capacity C of the network; 3) confirmation latency for honest transactions proportional to the propagation delay D, with confirmation error probability exponentially small in the bandwidth-delay product CD; 4) eventual total ordering of all transactions. Our approach to the design of this protocol is based on deconstructing the blockchain into its basic functionalities and systematically scaling up these functionalities to approach their physical limits.

This is joint work with Vivek Bagaria, David Tse, Giulia Fanti and Pramod Viswanath. The full paper can be found here.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 3:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Optics & Electronics Seminar presents New designer materials: Sculpting electromagnetic fields on the atomic scale

Topic: 
New designer materials: Sculpting electromagnetic fields on the atomic scale
Abstract / Description: 

New optical nanomaterials hold the potential for breakthroughs in a wide range of areas from ultrafast optoelectronics such as modulators, light sources and hyperspectral detectors, to efficient upconversion for energy applications, bio-sensing and on-chip components for quantum information science. An exciting opportunity to realize such new nanomaterials lies in controlling the local electromagnetic environment on the atomic- and molecular-scale, (~1-10 nm) which enables extreme local field enhancements. We use creative nanofabrication techniques at the interface between chemistry and physics to realize this new regime, together with advanced, ultrafast optical techniques to probe the emerging phenomena. Here, I will provide an overview of our recent research including high-speed thermal photodetectors, ultrafast spontaneous emission and enhanced biosensors.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 26, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Detecting Single Photons with Superconductors

Topic: 
Detecting Single Photons with Superconductors
Abstract / Description: 

From space communications to quantum communications to sensing dark matter, ultrasenstive, ultrafast photodetectors are required. But conventional detector technologies often fall short, exhibiting noise, slow response times, poor sensitivity, or a combination of these issues. In contrast, superconducting detectors based on nanowires provide a unique combination of high speed, excellent efficiency, and low noise. Their underlying physical operating mechanism also provides a rich parameter space for application of physics across the optical, condensed-matter, and microwave domains. For example, we have recently used an ultra-slow plasmonic microwave mode in the nanowires to demonstrate single-photon-sensitive imaging. This rich physical parameter space for engineering has has resulted in improved device performance and extended the impact of these devices even further.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 27, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Industry Lunch with Dr. Orly Liba (EE PhD '18)

Topic: 
Dr. Orly Liba (EE PhD) shares insights
Abstract / Description: 

Stanford WEE is organizing an Industry lunch with Dr. Orly Liba from Google. Dr. Liba has a PhD from Stanford EE and will be sharing her personal experiences of graduate school and working in industry.

Note: The event is limited to the first 20 students who sign-up. REGISTRATION LINK

 


READ Orly's EE Spotlight

 

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 204

SCIEN Industry Affiliates Meeting

Topic: 
SCIEN Industry Affiliates Meeting
Abstract / Description: 

SCIEN Industry Affiliates Meeting gives you the opportunity to meet new SCIEN faculty and the postdocs and graduate students who are working in image systems engineering, with expertise in optics, computational imaging, human vision and machine learning. Read Poster Abstracts and bios.

Registration is required
Date and Time: 
Friday, November 30, 2018 - 1:30pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
- please register -

Women in Business and Engineering Mixer

Topic: 
[RSVP required] Women in Business and Engineering Mixer
Abstract / Description: 

SWIB, SWE, WEE, and WiCs will be hosting a
Women in Business and Engineering Mixer
Tuesday, November 27th from 6:30pm - 7:30pm in Freidenrich Hall

Please RSVP for a great dinner and a chance to meet other women interested in the intersection of technology and business!

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 27, 2018 - 6:30pm

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