Graduate

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Searches for new Physics with Nuclear Spin Precession

Topic: 
Searches for new Physics with Nuclear Spin Precession
Abstract / Description: 

Prof. Mike Romalis of Princeton University will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium on Jan. 23, 2018, entitled "Searches for new Physics with Nuclear Spin Precession."

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: Symmetries of Time

Topic: 
Symmetries of Time
Abstract / Description: 

Time is a basic element in our models of the physical world, as is symmetry. Several issues at the frontiers of modern physics concern the interplay of those concepts. Elaborating on this theme, I will survey the current state of axions and time crystals, including very recent work.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

SCIEN Talk: Street View 2018 - The Newest Generation of Mapping Hardware

Topic: 
Street View 2018 - The Newest Generation of Mapping Hardware
Abstract / Description: 

A brief overview of Street View from it's inception 10 years ago until now will be presented. Street level Imagery has been the prime objective for Google's Street View in the past, and has now migrated into a state-of-the-art mapping platform. Challenges and solutions to the design and fabrication of the imaging system and optimization of hardware to align with specific software post processing will be discussed. Real world challenges of fielding hardware in 80+ countries will also be addressed.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN Talk: Learning where to look in 360 environments

Topic: 
Learning where to look in 360 environments
Abstract / Description: 

Many vision tasks require not just categorizing a well-composed human-taken photo, but also intelligently deciding "where to look" in order to get a meaningful observation in the first place. We explore how an agent can anticipate the visual effects of its actions, and develop policies for learning to look around actively---both for the sake of a specific recognition task as well as for generic exploratory behavior. In addition, we examine how a system can learn from unlabeled video to mimic human videographer tendencies, automatically deciding where to look in unedited 360 degree panoramas. Finally, to facilitate 360 video processing, we introduce spherical convolution, which allows application of off-the-shelf deep networks and object detectors to 360 imagery.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN Talk: Driverless Anything and the Role of LiDAR

Topic: 
Driverless Anything and the Role of LiDAR
Abstract / Description: 

LiDAR, or light detection and ranging, is a versatile light-based remote sensing technology that has been the subject of a great deal of attention in recent times. It has shown up in a number of media venues, and has even led to public debate about engineering choices of a well-known electric car company, Tesla Motors. During this talk the speaker will provide some background on LiDAR and discuss why it is a key link to the future autonomous vehicle ecosystem as well as its strong connection to power electronics technologies.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

SCIEN Talk: Advancing Healthcare with AI and VR

Topic: 
Advancing Healthcare with AI and VR
Abstract / Description: 

Quality, cost, and accessibility form an iron triangle that has prevented healthcare from achieving accelerated advancement in the last few decades. Improving any one of the three metrics may lead to degradation of the other two. However, thanks to recent breakthroughs in artificial intelligence (AI) and virtual reality (VR), this iron triangle can finally be shattered. In this talk, I will share the experience of developing DeepQ, an AI platform for AI-assisted diagnosis and VR-facilitated surgery. I will present three healthcare initiatives we have undertaken since 2012: Healthbox, Tricorder, and VR surgery, and explain how AI and VR play pivotal roles in improving diagnosis accuracy and treatment effectiveness. And more specifically, how we have dealt with not only big data analytics, but also small data learning, which is typical in the medical domain. The talk concludes with roadmaps and a list of open research issues in signal processing and AI to achieve precision medicine and surgery.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

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