Graduate

SystemX presents Quantum Computing with Spins in Silicon

Topic: 
Quantum computing with spins in silicon
Abstract / Description: 

The realization of quantum computers will provide a new and unprecedented computing resource that could significantly impact many industries ranging from medicine to artificial intelligence. Recently, the field of quantum computing has been transitioning from experimental demonstrations of quantum bits (qubits) to engineering larger scale quantum systems with the aid of industry. Electron spin qubits in silicon are an excellent candidate for this purpose as they can be made using transistor-like structures that are CMOS compatible, opening up the possibility to leverage off the semiconducting industry [1].

In this talk I will discuss the state-of-the-art in the silicon spin qubit field focusing on my recent work at TUDelft where we demonstrated a programmable two-qubit quantum processor that could perform the Deutsch-Josza and Grover search algorithm [2]. Moving to larger scale qubit systems will require the ability to make reproducible qubit arrays which is incredibly challenging for university clean rooms due limited process control and slow turn around. I will discuss how these issues are being addressed at Intel through the use of their industrial 300mm fabrication line and expertise in high volume electrical tests.

[1] F. A. Zwanenburg et al. Silicon quantum electronics, Rev. Mod. Phys. 85, 961 (2013)

[2] T. F. Watson et al. A programmable two-qubit processor in silicon, Nature 555, 633-637 (2018)

Date and Time: 
Thursday, February 28, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Bldg. 380 Rm. 380X

SystemX BONUS lecture: Microrobots as the Future of Tools: Designing Effective Platforms and Collaborative Swarms

Topic: 
Secure and Spectrum-Aware Wireless Communications: Challenges and Opportunities
Abstract / Description: 

The Internet of Things (IoT) is redefining how we interact with the world by supplying a global view based not only on human-provided data but also human-device connected data. For example, in Health Care, IoT will bring decreased costs, improved treatment results, and better disease management. However, the connectivity-in-everything model brings heightened security concerns. Additionally, the projected growth of connected nodes not only increases security concerns, it also leads to a 1000-fold increase in wireless data traffic in the near future. This data storm results in a spectrum scarcity thereby driving the urgent need for shared spectrum access technologies. These security deficiencies and the wireless spectrum crunch require innovative system-level secure and scalable solutions.

This talk will introduce energy-efficient and application-driven system-level solutions for secure and spectrum-aware wireless communications. I will present an ultra-fast bit-level frequency-hopping scheme for physical-layer security. This scheme utilizes the frequency agility of devices in combination with time-interleaved radio frequency architectures and protocols to achieve secure wireless communications. To address the wireless spectrum crunch, future smart radio systems will evaluate the spectrum usage dynamically and opportunistically use the underutilized spectrum; this will require spectrum sensing for interferer avoidance. I will discuss a system-level approach using band-pass sparse signal processing for rapid interferer detection in a wideband spectrum to convert the abstract improvements promised by sparse signal processing theory, e.g., fewer measurements, to concrete improvements in time and energy efficiency. Beyond these system-level solutions, I will also discuss future research directions including secure package-less THz tags and ingestible micro-bio-electronic devices.

 

Date and Time: 
Friday, February 22, 2019 - 11:00am
Venue: 
Packard 202

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents Karthik and Arushi

Topic: 
User Interface
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium (EE380) meets on Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 throughout the academic year. Talks are given before a live audience in Room 104 of the Shriram Building on the Stanford Campus. The live talks (and the videos hosted at Stanford and on YouTube) are open to the public.

Stanford students may enroll in EE380 to take the Colloquium as a one unit S/NC class. Enrolled students are required to keep and electronic notebook or journal and to write a short, pithy comment about each of the ten lectures and a short free form evaluation of the class in order to receive credit. Assignments are due at the end of the quarter, on the last day of examinations.

EE380 is a video class. Live attendance is encouraged but not required. We (the organizers) feel that watching the video is not a substitute for being present in the classroom. Questions are encouraged.

Many past EE380 talks are available on YouTube, see the EE380 Playlist.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents Jamie Morgenstern

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium (EE380) meets on Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 throughout the academic year. Talks are given before a live audience in Room 104 of the Shriram Building on the Stanford Campus. The live talks (and the videos hosted at Stanford and on YouTube) are open to the public.

Stanford students may enroll in EE380 to take the Colloquium as a one unit S/NC class. Enrolled students are required to keep and electronic notebook or journal and to write a short, pithy comment about each of the ten lectures and a short free form evaluation of the class in order to receive credit. Assignments are due at the end of the quarter, on the last day of examinations.

EE380 is a video class. Live attendance is encouraged but not required. We (the organizers) feel that watching the video is not a substitute for being present in the classroom. Questions are encouraged.

Many past EE380 talks are available on YouTube, see the EE380 Playlist.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents Judith Estrin

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


 

The Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium (EE380) meets on Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 throughout the academic year. Talks are given before a live audience in Room 104 of the Shriram Building on the Stanford Campus. The live talks (and the videos hosted at Stanford and on YouTube) are open to the public.

Stanford students may enroll in EE380 to take the Colloquium as a one unit S/NC class. Enrolled students are required to keep and electronic notebook or journal and to write a short, pithy comment about each of the ten lectures and a short free form evaluation of the class in order to receive credit. Assignments are due at the end of the quarter, on the last day of examinations.

EE380 is a video class. Live attendance is encouraged but not required. We (the organizers) feel that watching the video is not a substitute for being present in the classroom. Questions are encouraged.

Many past EE380 talks are available on YouTube, see the EE380 Playlist.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents

Topic: 
TBA
Abstract / Description: 

TBA


The Stanford EE Computer Systems Colloquium (EE380) meets on Wednesdays 4:30-5:45 throughout the academic year. Talks are given before a live audience in Room 104 of the Shriram Building on the Stanford Campus. The live talks (and the videos hosted at Stanford and on YouTube) are open to the public.

Stanford students may enroll in EE380 to take the Colloquium as a one unit S/NC class. Enrolled students are required to keep and electronic notebook or journal and to write a short, pithy comment about each of the ten lectures and a short free form evaluation of the class in order to receive credit. Assignments are due at the end of the quarter, on the last day of examinations.

EE380 is a video class. Live attendance is encouraged but not required. We (the organizers) feel that watching the video is not a substitute for being present in the classroom. Questions are encouraged.

Many past EE380 talks are available on YouTube, see the EE380 Playlist.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium presents Electronic Design Automation (EDA) and the Resurgence of Chip Design

Topic: 
Electronic Design Automation (EDA) and the Resurgence of Chip Design
Abstract / Description: 

Electronic Design Automation (EDA) enables the design of semiconductors comprised of tens of billions of devices. EDA consists of design software incorporating cutting-edge optimization and analysis algorithms, as well as pre-designed blocks known as "Intellectual Property" (IP). This talk reviews trends in the EDA industry in the context of the Semiconductor industry, highlighting new developments such as the rise of IP to become the largest segment in EDA, the increased use of system-level tools, and the resurgence of chip design particularly in the area of artificial intelligence. The talk ends with a brief mention of two related activities: The Stanford class "EDA and Machine Learning Hardware", in which students learn the inner workings of (some) EDA tools and how to use them effectively to design digital hardware, e.g. a convolutional neural network for image recognition implemented in an FPGA; and Silicon Catalyst, an innovative local incubator focused on accelerating solutions in Silicon.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Shriram 104

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Critical Fabulations: Reworking the Methods and Margins of Design

Topic: 
Critical Fabulations: Reworking the Methods and Margins of Design
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)


Speaker Daniela Rosner
Assistant Professor, Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering, University of Washington
Critical Fabulations: Reworking the Methods and Margins of Design

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 11, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Seeing is Believing: The Role of Materials in Painting Life

Topic: 
Seeing is Believing: The Role of Materials in Painting Life
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)


Speaker Barbara Berrie
Head of Scientific Research Department, National Gallery of Art
Seeing is Believing: The Role of Materials in Painting Life

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 25, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Precision Chemical Sensing: Using techniques from Quantum Optics to reach part-per-trillion sensitivity in the field

Topic: 
Precision Chemical Sensing: Using techniques from Quantum Optics to reach part-per-trillion sensitivity in the field
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)


Speaker Tony Miller
CEO, Entanglement Technologies
Precision Chemical Sensing: Using techniques from Quantum Optics to reach part-per-trillion sensitivity in the field

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 11, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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