Graduate

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "The magic of moiré quantum matter"

Topic: 
The magic of moiré quantum matter
Abstract / Description: 

The understanding of strongly-correlated quantum matter has challenged physicists for decades. The discovery three years ago of correlated phases and superconductivity in magic angle twisted bilayer graphene led to the emergence of a new materials platform to investigate strongly correlated physics, namely moiré quantum matter. These systems exhibit a plethora of quantum phases, such as correlated insulators, superconductivity, magnetism, Chern insulators, and more. In this talk I will review some of the recent advances in the field, focusing on the newest generation of moiré quantum systems, where correlated physics, superconductivity, and other fascinating phases can be studied with unprecedented tunability. I will end the talk with an outlook of some exciting directions in this emerging field.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 9, 2021 - 4:30pm

Mapping urban emissions with neighborhood resolution

Topic: 
Mapping urban emissions with neighborhood resolution
Abstract / Description: 

Most people on earth live in cities and they are responsible for the majority of greenhouse gas emissions. Cities are also where exposure to poor air quality is most frequent and most variable. Understanding and managing the path to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions, improved public health and lower public health inequities requires a view into the emissions and atmospheric chemistry of cities with the fine-grained detail that allows evaluation of specific processes and variations from one neighborhood to another. In this talk, I will describe the development of the Berkeley Environment, Air Quality and CO2 Network (BEACO2N http://beacon.berkeley.edu/about/), a dense network for mapping urban CO2, NOx, CO, O3 and aerosol. Each node of the network contains multiple optical and ChemFET sensors which accurately quantify the trace gases and are calibrated in the field using a variety of cross-referencing methods and comparisons with traceable standards. Integration of the BEACO2N maps with simple Gaussian plume models and sophisticated inversions employing high resolution weather models provide unique observational constraints on spatial and temporal patterns of CO2 and other emissions. Examples from the COVID shelter-in-place and testing models of fuel efficiency vs. vehicle speed in the SF Bay Area will be described along with prospects for further extension to other cities and other chemicals.



Organized by Stanford OSA/SPIE Student Chapter with SPRC and Ginzton Lab

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 9, 2021 - 1:30pm

VPGE Workshop: Top Tips to Manage Graduate Life

Topic: 
Grad Student Workshop: Top Tips to Manage Graduate Life
Abstract / Description: 

Come join VPGE to learn more about how to manage your graduate life!

Workshop: Top Tips to Manage Graduate Life

Learn how to manage the challenges and joys of grad student life, focusing on managing your schedule, your relationship with your advisor, and making the most of what should be a truly special time.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 4, 2021 - 4:00pm
Tags: 

IEEE, Santa Clara Valley Chapter presents "Improving the stability of RNA therapeutics through biophysics, machine learning, and crowdsourcing"

Topic: 
Improving the stability of RNA therapeutics through biophysics, machine learning, and crowdsourcing
Abstract / Description: 

The COVID-19 pandemic is unlikely to end until a majority of the world's population is vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The first authorized vaccine candidates have been based on messenger RNA molecules that promote translation of SARS-CoV-2 antigen proteins. However, these vaccines currently need to be kept frozen during shipping and storage, and have been logistically problematic for delivery to developing countries and to rural populations in developed countries. The inherent chemical instability of RNA molecules sets a fundamental limit on the stability of mRNA vaccines, but a largely unexplored strategy to reduce mRNA hydrolysis is to redesign RNAs to form protected double-stranded regions while coding for the same proteins. We developed a series of principled biophysical models for RNA degradation, and used these models to launch crowdsourced design initiatives on the massive open online laboratory Eterna, as well as to develop fully-automated design algorithms. We anticipate this work will be formative for guiding future therapeutic and vaccine development in potency and stability.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 24, 2021 - 6:00pm
Venue: 
Registration required

Electronic Systems Technology Seminar: From Scaled Transistors with 2D Materials to Qubits: How to Continue Improving Computing

Topic: 
From Scaled Transistors with 2D Materials to Qubits: How to Continue Improving Computing
Abstract / Description: 

For the past 20 years, doomsayers have been talking about the end of performance increase in computing because transistor scaling was supposed to end. We all know this was far from true and continued physical and performance scaling of transistors has enabled huge leaps in computing power. Maintaining physical or performance scaling of the switches themselves is becoming more difficult and alternative channel materials are starting to look very promising for replacing Si. Certain oxides and 2D or 1D semiconductors are prime candidates to enable continued performance and/or area scaling while maintaining the computing paradigm. Beyond these simple switches, performance gains at function level could come from implementing more complex devices such as majority gates. Beyond functional scaling, paradigm changes such as quantum computing could provide continued increase of computing power. In this presentation, we will touch on few key topics for several of the devices that enable this continued performance gains. We will outline what we believe to be important aspects to innovate on.

Transistors with 2D materials hold the promise for extreme gate length scaling compared to Si as they can be deposited with monolayer precision, and mobility is expected to be almost independent of material thickness. In this presentation, we will discuss imec's work on 2D materials going from certain materials and process steps, through device fabrication and modelling of transistors with 2D materials. We will briefly cover device architecture for high performance applications and implications for device integration. We will emphasize how variability analysis can help differentiate between one-off observations and consistent process control and understanding.

Quantum computing is fundamentally different that classical computing but many of the technology challenges are similar to those for building classical systems. In this talk, we will outline how learning and practices from standard semiconductor development can be used to enable quantum computing. We will discuss how materials and process development can improve device performance. We explain how standard modelling can be extended to describe qubits. And we will describe imec's latest work on qubits.


The EST Seminar series hosted by the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford is designed to explore and disseminate research and developments on electronic systems. This includes advances in materials science, device physics, device technologies, as well as circuits and architectures that could impact future electronic systems.The application space spans the gamut of computing, memory, communication, energy harvesting and storage, power devices, sensors and sensor systems. Distinguished speakers from both industry and academia are invited to present their most recent research in these respective fields.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 2, 2021 - 1:00pm

SWE Faculty Lunch Series welcomes Prof. Jin Hyung Lee

Topic: 
Stanford Women in Engineering lunch with Faculty Event
Abstract / Description: 

SWE Faculty Lunch Series Presents: Jin Hyung Lee

Lunch with Associate Professor Jin Hyung Lee from the Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Bioengineering, Neurosurgery, and Electrical Engineering (by courtesy) Departments.

This faculty lunch is a great way to talk with Dr. Lee in a more intimate setting. Ask questions about neurological sciences, bioengineering, and electrical engineering as a major/minor or interest, how to navigate your undergraduate studies in engineering, research and career guidance, and anything else!

All are welcome!

Please fill out the RSVP form as soon as possible. We try to limit attendance to 15 people to keep an intimate environment. We will email the Zoom link to those who RSVP.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 8, 2021 - 11:00am

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