Graduate

Carl Zeiss Smart Glasses [SCIEN Talk]

Topic: 
Carl Zeiss Smart Glasses
Abstract / Description: 

Kai Stroeder, Managing Director at Carl Zeiss Smart Optics GmbH, will talk about the Carl Zeiss Smart Glasses.

This will be an informal session with an introduction and prototype demo of the Smart Glasses and an open discussion about future directions and applications.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 - 10:00am
Venue: 
Lucas Center for Imaging, P083

EE State of the Department

Topic: 
End-of-Year Meeting for EE Students, Postdocs, Faculty, and Staff
Abstract / Description: 

You are Invited to Attend EE's Annual State of the Department Meeting:

  • Come hear about new developments in the department and how student and faculty groups support our community.
  • Ask questions during a Q&A session with the Department Chair.
  • Free food & drinks will be served during the HappEE Hour. Please bring proof of age (21+) if you plan on drinking alcohol.
  • All attendees may enter a raffle to receive a $20 gift card (must be present to win)

 

This meeting is open to all members of the EE community.

We hope to see you there!

- EE Student Life Committee, GSEE & Fuse

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 1, 2017 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

An Information Theoretic Perspective of Fronthaul Constrained Cloud and Fog Radio Access Networks [Special Seminar: ISL Colloquium]

Topic: 
An Information Theoretic Perspective of Fronthaul Constrained Cloud and Fog Radio Access Networks
Abstract / Description: 

Cloud radio access networks (C-RANs) emerge as appealing architectures for next-generation wireless/cellular systems whereby the processing/decoding is migrated from the local base-stations/radio units (RUs) to a control/central unit (CU) in the "cloud". Fog radio access networks (F-RAN) address the case where the RUs are enhanced by having the ability of local caching of popular contents. The network
operates via fronthaul digital links connecting the CU and the RUs. In this talk we will address basic information theoretic aspects of such networks, with emphasis of simple oblivious processing. Theoretical results illustrate the considerable performance gains to be expected for different cellular models. Some interesting theoretical directions conclude the presentation.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202

Applications of Mixed Reality in Medical Education and Beyond

Topic: 
Applications of Mixed Reality in Medical Education and Beyond
Abstract / Description: 

For centuries, humans have been seeking ways to unlock the mysteries of the body and to study its structures and organs using everything from wax and plastic models, to animal models and human cadavers. As modern technology provides advances in virtual and augmented reality, we see new opportunities to teach and learn by applying our expertise in medical imaging and computation. In this talk, we will cover our work over the last two and a half years using the mixed reality Microsoft HoloLens device as a platform for teaching anatomy and related topics. A special focus will be on the social nature of this technology, which allows for "shared" or multiuser experiences that provide an enhanced level of engagement with students. We see this kind of technology as transforming education across our campus, in addition to other direct scientific and research applications in medicine, engineering, art and beyond.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 12:15pm
Venue: 
Clark S360

Pre-seminar presentation on 'Applications of Mixed Reality in Medical Education'

Topic: 
Pre-Seminar presentation on 'Applications of Mixed Reality in Medical Education'
Abstract / Description: 

Attend Dr. Hargreaves's pre-seminar presentation to learn more about Dr. Mark Griswold's seminar, "Applications of Mixed Reality in Medical Education and Beyond", to be held Thursday, May 25th.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 12:15pm
Venue: 
Clark Center Seminar room S361

Calibration and Dynamic Matching in Data Converters [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Calibration and Dynamic Matching in Data Converters
Abstract / Description: 

In the early days of integrated data converters, calibration was limited to factory adjustments made with programmable fuses and lasers. As integration levels increased, on-chip recalibration outside the factory became possible. Initially, such on-chip calibration operated only in the foreground, interrupting the conversion of the desired input. Later, calibration expanded to allow operation in the background, that is, during normal conversion. Both foreground and background calibration were done at first by making adjustments to the analog circuits. A breakthrough occurred with the realization that analog-to-digital converters with redundancy can be calibrated entirely in the digital domain. This approach shifted design complexity to the digital domain and took advantage of the rapid scaling of digital circuits. Recently, dynamic matching techniques, which have been used effectively in oversampled converters, have been combined with digital background calibration in Nyquist converters. In practice, error-insensitive analog circuit design, calibration, and dynamic matching are all important. The designer's job is to find the best combination of these techniques to meet the requirements of a given application, often focusing on minimizing power dissipation. This talk will describe issues related to all of these techniques.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

Engineering Hope with Biomimetic Systems [SystemX Seminar]

Topic: 
Engineering Hope with Biomimetic Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Biomimetic system (neural prosthesis) research has progressed rapidly in the recent years fueled by the unique interdisciplinary efforts fusing engineering, medicine, and biology.  Biomimetic systems will offer viable solution and thus hope to those suffering with neural disorder diseases, which currently do not have curable solutions but potentially affect very large population of people worldwide. This talk will present the works of neural implants in Biomimetic Research Lab (BRL) at UCLA, including 1) to regain the eyesight for the blind; 2) to restore the motor function for the spinal cord injury; 3) to recover the cognition. I’ll particularly discuss about the creation, technical challenge/barrier, clinical trials, and regulatory approval of the retinal prosthesis.  The success of the retinal prosthesis suggests that the technology could be applied to other physiological problems.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
AllenX

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