EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

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Ginzton Lab

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "A glimpse into the dark world of excitons in 2D semiconductors Via time--resolved µ-ARPES"

Topic: 
A glimpse into the dark world of excitons in 2D semiconductors Via time--resolved µ-ARPES
Abstract / Description: 

About a decade ago, the discovery of monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides opened a new frontier in the study of optically excited states in semiconductors, and related opto-electronic technologies. These materials exhibit a plethora of robust excitonic states, such as bright excitons at the K & K' valleys, momentum- and spin-forbidden dark excitons, and hot excitons. Optics-based experiments have revealed much about the bright excitonic states, but they remain largely unable to access their valley character, their scattering channels into other valleys within the Brilloin Zone, and the nature of the dark states in these valleys. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) based techniques would be ideal to access the valley character, and momentum-resolved scattering channels of photoexcited states in 2D semiconductors. But these are very challenging experiments to perform on the typically-available, micron-scale, 2D semiconductors. In today's talk, I will discuss the challenges involved, and progress made in my lab to date towards this aim. Any maybe – if time permits – we will end with an entertaining peek into the 'quantum psychology of dark excitons'!


 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 28, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Waves, Modes, Communications and Optics - Just How Many Different Light Beams are There?"

Topic: 
Waves, Modes, Communications and Optics - Just How Many Different Light Beams are There?
Abstract / Description: 

There are many useful ways we can think about optics and waves. “Modes,” like resonator modes or propagating modes in fibers, can give particularly powerful and simple descriptions. We then only need amplitudes of a few functions rather than field values at each of a large number of points. But, for scattering from complex nanophotonic structures or use of multiple beams or waves in space to send more information, these resonator or propagating modes are not enough, and can lead to confusion and even major error (for example, in correctly counting the number of “channels” we have to communicate). We need to think about scattering or communicating waves from some source space to some receiving space. That means we need pairs of functions, one in each space. Fortunately, there are elegant and efficient ways of establishing these pairs, both mathematically and physically. Once we do so, we find many simple heuristic behaviors; we can correctly count numbers of usable channels, establishing clear limits; and we can find the “right” fundamental basis pairs for describing optical systems. That basis is fundamental because it leads, for example, to new “Kirchhoff” radiation laws and a simpler “Einstein A&B” coefficient argument, both of which work mode by mode, but only for these new basis function pairs. Along the way, we establish a new “M-gauge” for electromagnetism and an elegant quantization of the electromagnetic field without arbitrary “boxes.” The talk is summarizing a recent paper [1] that introduces all of the necessary math, physics, and results.


 

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

This seminar series is sponsored by Ginzton Laboratory, SPRC, Applied Physics, Physics, and HEPL. 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 21, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Photonics in Computing"

Topic: 
Photonics in Computing
Abstract / Description: 

In the 1980s, optical computing emerged as an extremely active area of research promising immense parallelism and signal processing capabilities. Optical neural networks exploited Fourier transform, convolution, and nonlinear elements to demonstrate matrix multiplication, pattern recognition, and associative memory, capabilities. By the 1990s, however, the field of optical computing died. Psaltis wrote in his 1990 article that optical computing was dead because of (a) the lack of practical devices that can be integrated and because there was (2) insufficient knowledge of complex neural networks. Fast-forwarding to today, we find that (a) integrated circuits can contain heterogeneous nano-scale photonic and electronic components utilizing semiconductor industry ecosystems, and (b) new artificial neural network algorithms can imitate or even surpass the capabilities of humans. We discuss possible new directions in computing exploiting the nonlinearity of nanoelectronics and the parallelism of nanophotonics. We will cover two platforms: (1) brain-inspired spiking-photonic-neuromorphic computing utilizing embedded 3D photonic-electronic integrated circuits and (2) photonic-FPGA utilizing reconfigurable 3D photonics. Prospects of future computing systems including such photonic computing modules will also be discussed.


 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 14, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Splitting a Bose-Einstein Condensate Enables EPR Steering and Simultaneous Readout of Conjugate Observables"

Topic: 
Splitting a Bose-Einstein Condensate Enables EPR Steering and Simultaneous Readout of Conjugate Observables
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 7, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 & AMO Seminar presents "Adventures with Angular Momenta of Near Field Photons"

Topic: 
Adventures with Angular Momenta of Near Field Photons
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 Optics and Electronics Seminar

Prof. Olav Solgaard, Organizer Fall 2019

 

AMO Seminar Sub-Series first Monday of each month)

Monica Schleier-Smith, Organizer Fall 2019

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, September 30, 2019 - 4:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Effective medium approach towards topological photonics"

Topic: 
Pandora and Prometheus: Science, Scientists, and Society
Abstract / Description: 

As researchers in photonics we have both opportunities to positively impact people's lives and responsibilities to assist in ethical integration of these important new and disruptive technologies into modern society. While photonics provides solutions to critical global issues, such as key technology for measuring the environment and mitigating the impact of climate change, we are also developing new capabilities, which test society's legal and moral frameworks. Photonics enables the internet and social networking, high throughput sequencing of the human genome, pre-implantation testing of human embryos, measurement and control of neural networks in vivo—advances which present significant ethical challenges.

In addition, as scientists we are part of a global research community with the common goal of openly sharing our knowledge world-wide. Knowledge gives competitive and strategic advantages to those having access to it, leading to government pressure to limit free access to and unrestricted dissemination of scientific research. How do we reconcile our national responsibilities and loyalties with our responsibilities as members of the global scientific community to openly share our knowledge? These pressures become particularly acute when most of our research funding comes from federal/national sources.

Both students and faculty are welcome and encouraged to participate in an open discussion of these topics over lunch.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, June 6, 2019 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Ultrafast Multidimensional Coherent Spectroscopy of Color Centers in Diamond"

Topic: 
Ultrafast Multidimensional Coherent Spectroscopy of Color Centers in Diamond
Abstract / Description: 

Color centers in diamond are point defects within the diamond host lattice that absorb and emit light at optical frequencies. Besides contributing to the striking visual characteristics of "fancy colored diamond" gemstones, the centers—particularly the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center and silicon-vacancy (SiV-) center—offer a number of possibilities for quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this talk, I will summarize recent work investigating the properties of negatively charged silicon-vacancy centers in diamond using the optical multidimensional coherent spectroscopy (MDCS). Finding suggest a strong influence of strain in determining the presence or absence of radiative coupling in the centers. By extension, the results reveal a new knob for tuning color-center-based photonic devices.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Recent Advances in Submarine Fiber Optical Systems"

Topic: 
Recent Advances in Submarine Fiber Optical Systems
Abstract / Description: 

Undersea fiber optical systems have shown tremendous advances over the past one or two decades. Capacities have increased by 20x while the cost per bit of submarine transmission has decreased by 250 times. These advances have been primarily a result of coherent transmission and I will highlight all of the main points regarding these advances. This has led to the recent deployment of 16-QAM transmission on a trans-Atlantic link! Future directions in submarine fiber optic transmission systems, such as SDM, will also be discussed.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 23, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Hot Topics in Optics and Photonics"

Topic: 
Hot Topics in Optics and Photonics
Abstract / Description: 

Optics and photonics is a diverse field, spanning dynamic commercial successes to slowly-moving niche markets to speculative research and fundamental science. But most people only work in small spaces of the field at a given time, whether they are working in industry or academia. It can be difficult to visualize the entire field and understand it. How do you forecast where the technology is going? What is the Next Big Thing? How do you know what is a hot topic and what is a buzzword? This talk will provide ways of looking at current hot topics in photonics, in both the research funding and commercial markets. It will also give some perspectives on selected topics and where they are going. The talk will give "market perspectives," which is to say that it's about the overall environment and near- to mid-term future, rather than recent scientific results.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 16, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

OSA/SPIE present "Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse"

Topic: 
Measuring Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About a Light Pulse
Abstract / Description: 

The vast majority of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time have resulted directly from more powerful techniques for measuring light. Indeed, our most important source of information about our universe is light, and our ability to extract information from it is limited only by our ability to measure it.


Interestingly, most of the light in our universe remains immeasurable, involving long pulses of relatively broadband light, necessarily involving ultrafast and extremely complex temporal variations in their intensity and phase. As a result, it is important to develop techniques for measuring, ever more completely, light with ever more complex submicron detail in space and ever more complex ultrafast variations in time. The problem is severely complicated by the fact that the timescales involved correspond to the shortest events ever created, and measuring an event in time seems to require a shorter one, which, by definition, doesn't exist!
Nevertheless, we have developed simple, elegant techniques for completely measuring such light, using the light to measure itself and yielding a light pulse's intensity and phase vs. time and space. One technique involves making an optical spectrogram of the pulse using a nonlinear optical medium and whose mathematics is equivalent to the two-dimensional phase-retrieval problem—a problem that's solvable only because the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra fails for polynomials of two variables. In addition, we have recently developed simple methods for measuring the complete spatio-temporal electric field [E(x,y,z,t)] of an arbitrary, potentially complex light pulse without the need to average over multiple pulses.

Date and Time: 
Friday, May 10, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

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