Ginzton Lab

OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy"

Topic: 
Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy
Abstract / Description: 

Rapid and precise measurements are and always have been of interest in science and technology partly because of their numerous practical applications. Since their development, frequency comb-based methods have revolutionized optical measurements. They simultaneously provide high resolution, high sensitivity, and rapid acquisition times. These methods are being developed for use in many fields, from atomic and molecular spectroscopy, to precision metrology, to spectral LIDAR and even atmospheric monitoring. However they cannot address the issues of inhomogeneously broadened transitions or sample heterogeneity. This is especially important for remote chemical sensing applications.

In this talk I will discuss a novel optical method, that I recently developed, which overcomes these limitations. I will demonstrate its capabilities for probing extremely weak fundamental processes as well as its applications for rapid and high resolution chemical sensing.

 

References:

B. Lomsadze, B. Smith and S. T. Cundiff. "Tri-comb spectroscopy". Nature Photonics 12, 676, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency-comb based double-quantum two-dimensional spectrum identifies collective hyperfine resonances in atomic vapor induced by dipole-dipole interactions." Physical Review Letters 120, 233401, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency combs enable rapid and high-resolution multidimensional coherent spectroscopy". Science 357, 1389, 2017
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency comb-based four-wave-mixing spectroscopy". Optics letters 42, 2346, 2017

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

RESCHEDULED: OSA/SPIE, SPRC and Ginzton Lab present "Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy"

Topic: 
RESCHEDULED: Frequency comb-based nonlinear spectroscopy: Bridging the gap between fundamental science and cutting-edge technology
Abstract / Description: 

RESCHEDULED for June 12

Rapid and precise measurements are and always have been of interest in science and technology partly because of their numerous practical applications. Since their development, frequency comb-based methods have revolutionized optical measurements. They simultaneously provide high resolution, high sensitivity, and rapid acquisition times. These methods are being developed for use in many fields, from atomic and molecular spectroscopy, to precision metrology, to spectral LIDAR and even atmospheric monitoring. However they cannot address the issues of inhomogeneously broadened transitions or sample heterogeneity. This is especially important for remote chemical sensing applications.

In this talk I will discuss a novel optical method, that I recently developed, which overcomes these limitations. I will demonstrate its capabilities for probing extremely weak fundamental processes as well as its applications for rapid and high resolution chemical sensing.

 

References:

B. Lomsadze, B. Smith and S. T. Cundiff. "Tri-comb spectroscopy". Nature Photonics 12, 676, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency-comb based double-quantum two-dimensional spectrum identifies collective hyperfine resonances in atomic vapor induced by dipole-dipole interactions." Physical Review Letters 120, 233401, 2018.
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency combs enable rapid and high-resolution multidimensional coherent spectroscopy". Science 357, 1389, 2017
B. Lomsadze and S. T. Cundiff. "Frequency comb-based four-wave-mixing spectroscopy". Optics letters 42, 2346, 2017

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 20, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Allen 101X

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Ultrafast X-ray diffraction imaging with Free Electron Lasers

Topic: 
Ultrafast X-ray diffraction imaging with Free Electron Lasers
Abstract / Description: 

The advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) opens the door for unprecedented studies on non-crystallin nanoparticles with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In the recent past, ultrafast X-ray imaging studies with intense, femtosecond short FEL pulses have elucidated hidden processes in individual fragile specimens, which are inaccessible with conventional imaging techniques. Examples include airborne soot particle formation [1], metastable states in the synthesis of metal nanoparticles [2] and transient vortices in superfluid quantum systems [3] . Theoretically, ultrafast coherent diffraction X-ray imaging (CDI) could achieve atomic resolution in combination with sub-femtosecond temporal precision. Currently, the spatial resolution of ultrafast X-ray CDI is limited to several nanometers due to a combination of several factors such as X-ray photon flux, image imperfections and ultimately, sample damage [4] .

In this talk, I will present several experimental studies, which address these limitations and/or demonstrate the potential of ultrafast CDI. In the first part of the talk, I will report on a novel "in-flight" holographic method which overcomes the phase problem and paves the way for high-resolution X-ray imaging in presence of noise and image imperfections [5]. The second part will focus on potential applications of ultrafast X-ray CDI such as visualization of irreversible light-induced dynamics at the nanoscale with nanometer and sub-femtosecond resolutions [6]. In the third part, I will present world's first diffraction images of heavy atom nanoparticles recorded with isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses. The study indicates that the combination of the optimal pulse length and X-ray energy can significantly deviate from linear models and control over transient resonances might be an efficient pathway for the improvement of spatial resolution [7] .

In summary, ultrafast CDI is a powerful method for studies of transient non-equilibrium dynamics at the nanoscale. The increasing number of X-ray FEL facilities, and the constant improvement in accelerator and X-ray focusing technology will broaden our capabilities to observe transient states of matter. This development will have a significant impact on research fields such as catalysis, nanophotonics, matter under extreme conditions, light-matter interactions and biological studies.

[1] Loh, N. D. et al. Fractal morphology, imaging and mass spectrometry of single aerosol particles in flight. Nature 486, 513–517 (2012).
[2] Barke, I. et al. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering. Nat. Commun. 6, (2015):6187.
[3] Gomez, L. F. et al. Shapes and vorticities of superfluid helium nanodroplets. Science 345, 906–909 (2014).
[4] Aquila, Andrew, et al., The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map., Structur. Dyn. 2.4 (2015): 041701
[5] Gorkhover,T. et al., Femtosecond and nanometre visualization of structural dynamics in superheated nanoparticles. Nat. Phot. 10, (2016):93.
[6] Gorkhover,T.,et al., Femtosecond X-ray Fourier holography imaging of free-flying nanoparticles. Nat. Phot. 12.3, (2018): 150.
[7] Kuschel, S., et al, in prep.

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

John G. Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology

Topic: 
Internet of Things and Internet of Energy for Connecting at Any Time and Any Place
Abstract / Description: 

In this presentation, I would like to discuss with you how to establish a sustainable and smart society through the internet of energy for connecting at any time and any place. I suspect that you have heard the phrase, "Internet of Energy" less often. The meaning of this phrase is simple. Because of a ubiquitous energy transmission system, you do not need to worry about a shortage of electric power. One of the most important items for establishing a sustainable society is [...]


"Inaugural Linvill Distinguished Seminar on Electronic Systems Technology," EE News, July 2018

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series presents "Quantum Electrodynamics of Superconducting Circuits"

Topic: 
Quantum Electrodynamics of Superconducting Circuits
Abstract / Description: 

The demand for rapid and high-fidelity execution of initialization, gate and read-out operations casts tight constraints on the accuracy of quantum electrodynamic modeling of superconducting integrated circuits. Attaining the required accuracies requires reconsidering our basic approach to the quantization of the electromagnetic field in a light-confining medium and the notion of normal modes. I will discuss a computational framework based on the Heisenberg-Langevin approach to address these fundamental questions. This framework allows the accurate determination of the quantum dynamics of a superconducting qubit in an arbitrarily complex electromagnetic environment, free of divergences that have plagued earlier approaches. I will also discuss the effectiveness of this computational approach in meeting the demands of present-day quantum computing research.


Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 3, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series

Topic: 
When quantum-information scrambling met quasiprobabilities
Abstract / Description: 

We do physics partially out of a drive to understand essences. One topic whose essence merits understanding is the out-of-time-ordered correlator (OTOC). The OTOC reflects quantum manybody thermalization, chaos, and scrambling (the spread of quantum information through manybody entanglement). The OTOC, I will show, equals an average over a quasiprobability distribution. A quasiprobability resembles a probability but can become negative and nonreal. Such nonclassical values can signal nonclassical physics. The OTOC quasiprobability has several applications: Experimentally, the quasiprobability points to a scheme for measuring the OTOC (via weak measurements, which refrain from disturbing the measured system much). The quasiprobability also signals false positives in attempts to measure scrambling of open systems. Theoretically, the quasiprobability links the OTOC to uncertainty relations, to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, and more strongly to chaos. As coarse-graining the quasiprobability yields the OTOC, the quasiprobability forms the OTOC's essence.

References
• NYH, Phys. Rev. A 95, 012120 (2017). https://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.95.012120
• NYH, Swingle, and Dressel, Phys. Rev. A 97, 042105 (2018). https://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.97.042105
• NYH, Bartolotta, and Pollack, arXiv:1806.04147 (2018). https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.04147
• Gonzàlez Alonso, NYH, and Dressel, arXiv:1806.09637 (2018). https://arxiv.org/abs/1806.09637
• Swingle and NYH, Phys. Rev. A 97, 062113 (2018). https://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.97.062113
• Dressel, Gonzàlez Alonso, Waegell, and NYH, Phys. Rev. A 98, 012132 (2018). https://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.98.012132


Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 12, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series presents Conductivity of a perfect crystal

Topic: 
Conductivity of a perfect crystal
Abstract / Description: 

Dissipation of electrical current in typical metals is due to scattering off material defects and phonons. But what if the material were a perfect crystal, and sufficiently stiff or cold to eliminate phonons -- would conductivity become infinite? We realize an analogous scenario with atomic fermions in a cubic optical lattice, and measure conductivity. The equivalent of Ohm's law for neutral particles gives conductivity as the ratio of particle current to the strength of an applied force. Our measurements are at non-zero frequency (since a trapping potential prevents dc current flow), giving the low-frequency spectrum of real and imaginary conductivity. Since our atoms carry no charge, we measure particle currents with in-situ microscopy, with which both on- and off-diagonal response is visible. Sum rules are used to relate the observed conductivity to thermodynamic properties such as kinetic energy. We explore the effect of lattice depth, temperature, interaction strength, and atom number on conductivity. Using a relaxation-time approximation, we extract the transport time, i.e., the relaxation rate of current through collisions. Returning to the initial question, we demonstrate that fermion-fermion collisions damp current since the lattice breaks Galilean invariance.


Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 29, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series

Topic: 
New opportunities with old photonic materials
Abstract / Description: 

 Lithium niobate (LN) is an "old" material with many applications in optical and microwave technologies, owing to its unique properties that include large second order nonlinear susceptibility, large piezoelectric response, and wide optical transparency window. Conventional LN components, including modulators and periodically polled frequency converters, have been the workhorse of the optoelectronic industry. They are reaching their limits, however, as they rely on weakly guiding ion-diffusion defined optical waveguides in bulk LN crystal. I will discuss our efforts aimed at the development of integrated LN platform, featuring sub-wavelength scale light confinement and dense integration of optical and electrical components, that has the potential to revolutionize optical communication networks and microwave photonic systems, as well as enable realization of quantum photonic circuits. Good example is our recently demonstrated integrated LN electro-optic modulator that can be driven directly by a CMOS circuit, that supports data rates > 200 gigabits per second with > 90% optical transmission efficiency. I will also discuss our work on ultra-high Q LN optical cavities (Q ~ 10,000,000) and their applications, as well as nonlinear wavelength conversion using different approaches based on LN films.
Diamond is another "old" material with remarkable properties! It is transparent from the ultra-violet to infrared, has a high refractive index, strong optical nonlinearity and a wide variety of light-emitting defects of interest for quantum communication and computation. In my talk, I will summarize our efforts towards the development of integrated diamond quantum photonics platform aimed at realization of efficient photonic and phononic interfaces for diamond spin qubits.


 

Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 22, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483, Ginzton Lab, & AMO Seminar Series presents Dynamic photonic structures

Topic: 
Dynamic photonic structures: non-reciprocity, gauge potential, and synthetic dimensions.
Abstract / Description: 

 

We show that dynamic photonic structures, where refractive index of the structure is modulated as a function of time, offers a wide ranges of possibilities for exploration of physics and applications of light. In particular, dynamic photonic structures naturally break reciprocity. With proper design such photonic structure can then be used to achieve complete optical isolation and to completely reproduce magneto-optical effects without the use of gyrotropic materials. Moreover, the phase of the modulation corresponds to an effective magnetic gauge potential for photons, through which one can explore a wide variety of fundamental physics effects of synthetic magnetic field using photons. Finally, such dynamic photonic structure can be used to explore physics, especially topological physics, in dimensions that are higher than the physical dimension of the structure, leading to intriguing possibilities in manipulation of the frequencies of light in non-trivial ways.


 

Academic year 2018-2019, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, October 15, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

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