Ginzton Lab

New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab

Topic: 
New Directions in Management Science & Engineering: A Brief History of the Virtual Lab
Abstract / Description: 

Lab experiments have long played an important role in behavioral science, in part because they allow for carefully designed tests of theory, and in part because randomized assignment facilitates identification of causal effects. At the same time, lab experiments have traditionally suffered from numerous constraints (e.g. short duration, small-scale, unrepresentative subjects, simplistic design, etc.) that limit their external validity. In this talk I describe how the web in general—and crowdsourcing sites like Amazon's Mechanical Turk in particular—allow researchers to create "virtual labs" in which they can conduct behavioral experiments of a scale, duration, and realism that far exceed what is possible in physical labs. To illustrate, I describe some recent experiments that showcase the advantages of virtual labs, as well as some of the limitations. I then discuss how this relatively new experimental capability may unfold in the future, along with some implications for social and behavioral science.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:15pm
Venue: 
Packard 101

Claude E. Shannon's 100th Birthday

Topic: 
Centennial year of the 'Father of the Information Age'
Abstract / Description: 

From UCLA Shannon Centennial Celebration website:

Claude Shannon was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory". Shannon founded information theory and is perhaps equally well known for founding both digital computer and digital circuit design theory. Shannon also laid the foundations of cryptography and did basic work on code breaking and secure telecommunications.

 

Events taking place around the world are listed at IEEE Information Theory Society.

Date and Time: 
Saturday, April 30, 2016 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
N/A

Ginzton Lab / AMO Seminar

Topic: 
2D/3D Photonic Integration Technologies for Arbitrary Optical Waveform Generation in Temporal, Spectral, and Spatial Domains
Abstract / Description: 

Beginning Academic year 2015-2016, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 29, 2016 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Ginzton Lab / AMO Seminar

Topic: 
Silicon-Plus Photonics for Tomorrow's (Astronomically) Large-Scale Networks
Abstract / Description: 

Beginning Academic year 2015-2016, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP 483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 22, 2016 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Ginzton Lab / AMO Seminar

Topic: 
'Supermode-Polariton Condensation in a Multimode Cavity QED-BEC System' and 'Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Atoms and Molecules'
Abstract / Description: 

Beginning Academic year 2015-2016, please join us at Spilker room 232 every Monday afternoon from 4 pm for the AP483 & Ginzton Lab, and AMO Seminar Series.

Refreshments begin at 4 pm, seminar at 4:15 pm.

Date and Time: 
Monday, January 4, 2016 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Ginzton Lab: Special Optics Seminar

Topic: 
A Carbon Nanotube Optical Rectenna
Abstract / Description: 

An optical rectenna – that is, a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to d.c. electricity – was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 petahertz (switching speed on the order of a femtosecond). Ultralow capacitance, on the order of a few attofarads, enables a diode to operate at these frequencies; and the development of metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions with nanoscale dimensions has emerged as a potential path to diodes with ultralow capacitance, but these structures remain extremely difficult to fabricate and couple to a nanoscale antenna reliably. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with ultralow junction capacitance of approximately 2 attofarads, at the tips of multiwall carbon nanotubes, which act as the antenna and metallic electron field emitter in the diode. This demonstration is achieved using very small diode areas based on the diameter of a single carbon nanotube (about 10 nanometers), geometric field enhancement at the carbon nanotube tips, and a low work function semitransparent top metal contact. Using vertically-aligned arrays of the diodes, we measure d.c. open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current at visible and infrared electromagnetic frequencies that is due to a rectification process, and quantify minor contributions from thermal effects. In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field is rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Our devices show evidence of photon-assisted tunneling that reduces diode resistance by two orders of magnitude under monochromatic illumination. Additionally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination. Numerous current-voltage scans on different devices, and between 5-77 degrees Celsius, show no detectable change in diode performance, indicating a potential for robust operation.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232
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