EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium

How to Design Addictive Games [EE380 Computer Systems]

Topic: 
How to Design Addictive Games
Abstract / Description: 

A great game seduces its player into flow state. Since we know a lot about what flow state is and what it requires, you might imagine that game's design to be a lot of work, but not mysterious. Yet 99% of all games fail. The vast majority of game designers have never designed an addictive game. In HCI research, games are analyzed based on flow state properties but that's descriptive, not prescriptive. Designing such games remains mystical. Like other performing arts, game design needs accident, luck, inspiration, perspiration, and knowledge. I would like to justify my being invited to talk so on top of the skeleton of flow, I will add some meat that you would not likely hear from anyone else. I will talk about what I learned playtesting my own work and what I was taught by great game designers, in creating games that were indeed addictive. As such, this will be a very idiosyncratic and personal introduction to the art of designing irresistible engagement.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Computers, Programming, Addiction, False News, Alternative Facts [EE380 Computer Systems]

Topic: 
Computers, Programming, Addiction, False News, Alternative Facts
Abstract / Description: 

Today's Internet is powerful and seductive. It's burrowed itself into the way we think, feel, and respond. We have come to depend upon the availability of organized, accessible, searchable information. But with the positive effects, there are negative factors as well, with unforeseen consequences, that change the very way we experience the world.

Archiving and indexing all of the world's information has changed the way we think, but it has its limitations. Very low cost communication and publication have both positive and negative effects. Interactive environments are compelling and sometimes addictive. Social interactions on the Internet are different than they are in "real life". Truth seems less important than it once was.

This talk will identify and explore a few of these issues. Interactive discussion will be encouraged.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Software-centric Visible Light Communication for the Internet of Things [EE380 Computer Systems]

Topic: 
Software-centric Visible Light Communication for the Internet of Things
Abstract / Description: 

Visible Light Communication (VLC) based on LEDs for light emission and reception can be realized using simple components, delegating many of the "hard" problems to software. We present a software-centric approach that supports networking a wide range of devices -- devices that include only simple single LEDs (such as wearables, toys, consumer electronics) as well as LED light bulbs that run Linux and provide a VLC communication fabric (room-area network). One of the benefits of the software-centric approach is easy integration into distributed applications - a necessary condition for a pervasive communication infrastructure for the Internet of Things that requires a wide range of services (localization, time, authentication, etc).

Joint work with Stefan Mangold (Lovefield Wireless, Inc.) and Stefan Schmid (ETH Zurich).

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

PyWren - pushing microservices to teraflops [EE380 Computer Systems]

Topic: 
PyWren - pushing microservices to teraflops
Abstract / Description: 

Much of cloud computing infrastructure remains hard to use, in spite of decades of both academic research and commercialization. Fortunately, recent technologies developed for web services and internet startups can be repurposed to enable a much lower-friction scalable cloud experience. Our goal is making the power, elasticity, and dynamism of commercial cloud services like Amazon's EC2 accessible to busy applied physicists, electrical engineers, and data scientists, as well as a compelling new capability over Matlab, hopefully encouraging migration. We built PyWren, a transparent distributed execution engine on top of AWS Lambda, which hopefully simplifies many scale-out use cases for data science and computational imaging. We will demo applications built on our framework and seek user input into next directions.

Joint work with Shivaram Venkataraman, Qifan Pu, Ion Stoica, and Ben Recht.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Living in Information Everywhere [EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium]

Topic: 
Living in Information Everywhere
Abstract / Description: 

The term cloud computing increasingly describes not just the technology of large networked data centers, but is a proxy term for the unification of smartphones, apps, IoT, Big Data, and Artificial Intelligence -- in effect, the deployment of computational intelligence to virtually every point on the planet. One may view this as a fulfillment of Moore's Law, or the start of decades-long project that is likely to reshape civilization. As someone who both covers this topic and has been profoundly affected by it, I will speak about the technology, and what historical parallels tell us about the likely impact.

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 10, 2017 - 3:10pm to 4:10pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Neuromorphic Chips: Addressing the Nanostransistor Challenge by Combining Analog Computation with Digital Communication [EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium]

Topic: 
Neuromorphic Chips: Addressing the Nanostransistor Challenge by Combining Analog Computation with Digital Communication
Abstract / Description: 

As transistors shrink to nanoscale dimensions, trapped electrons--blocking "lanes" of electron traffic--are making it difficult for digital computers to work. In stark contrast, the brain works fine with single-lane nanoscale devices that are intermittently blocked (ion channels). Conjecturing that it achieves error-tolerance by combining analog dendritic computation with digital axonal communication, neuromorphic engineers (neuromorphs) began emulating dendrites with subthreshold analog circuits and axons with asynchronous digital circuits in the mid-1980s. Three decades in, they achieved a consequential scale with Neurogrid, the first neuromorphic system with billions of synaptic connections. Neuromorphs then tackled the challenge of mapping arbitrary computations onto neuromorphic chips in a manner robust to lanes intermittently--or even permanently--blocked by trapped electrons. Having demonstrated scalability and programmability, they now seek to encode continuous signals with spike trains in a manner that promises greater energy efficiency than all-analog or all-digital computing across a five-decade precision range.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

50 Years in the Making: The Open RISC-V Instruction Set architecture [EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium & EE180]

Topic: 
50 Years in the Making: The Open RISC-V Instruction Set architecture
Abstract / Description: 

About the talk (10:30-11:30):
We start by reviewing 50 years of computer architecture to show there is now widespread agreement on instruction set architecture (ISA). Unlike other fields, despite this harmony there is no open alternative to proprietary offerings from ARM and Intel. Our champion is RISC-V, whose foundation has been joined by nearly every hi-tech company (except for the two with popular proprietary ISAs). We continue the discussion by focusing on the challenges ahead as IC technology slows down, older architectural approaches face diminishing returns, and the needs of users change dramatically.

 

General Information: This presentation is the last lecture of EE180 for Winter 2017. The lecture is open to the public. The lecture will not be video recorded nor available on the web.

EE380 students and attendees are urged to attend this lecture, but it is optional. It cannot be substituted for one of the ten required EE380 lectures.

 

Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 10:30am to 11:30am
Venue: 
Cubberly Auditorium, School of Education

Autonomous Driving, are we there yet? - technology, business, legal considerations [EE380]

Topic: 
Autonomous Driving, are we there yet? - technology, business, legal considerations
Abstract / Description: 

Autonomous driving is arguably one of the most anticipated topics in the tech community. It is pivotal to one of the most established industries as autonomous driving changes the entire field from a sector providing a very hardware oriented product to offering personal mobility without the need to drive a car. Now, there are still many questions to be answered. As we are changing the paradigm of what an automobile is, not just technology solutions need to be found, but also business models will change and legal frameworks need to be adapted. This talk will look at the topic of autonomous driving from different perspectives and discuss what needs to happen to make a great vision become reality and change transportation forever.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Google's Multilingual Neural Machine Translation System [EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium]

Topic: 
Google's Multilingual Neural Machine Translation System: Enabling Zero-Shot Translation
Abstract / Description: 

Neural Machine Translation (NMT) has been a big success story in the deep learning revolution. It has grown out of academic labs to large-scale adoption in a short period of time. Recently, we at Google announced that we are now providing neural translations to our users. In this talk, I will briefly review the history of machine translation and explain our GNMT (Google's NMT) system. I will talk about our approach to Multilingual NMT which aims to translate between multiple languages at the same time. This opens many interesting avenues for further research. Most notably, it enables us to perform Zero-Shot translation - the ability to translate between languages the model has never seen before. Further analysis of this phenomenon hints at a presence of an interlingua - a language independent representation.

This is joint work with many members from the Google Brain and Google Translate teams.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Gates B03

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium