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Nanomanufacturing: Science, Technology and Manufacturing Practice

Topic: 
Nanomanufacturing: Science, Technology and Manufacturing Practice
Abstract / Description: 

Good science, great technology and rapid innovation are the key attributes of a successful organization. Great organizations keep up with change by re-inventing themselves. Manufacturing frequently thought of as 'processes for making goods on a large scale' is erroneous and is dated.

Manufacture is rightfully value creation, and encompasses methods of realization post ideation. Volume flow within manufacturing is shifting towards mass customization. Batch size is shrinking, part identity, traceability, process flow, manufacturing geographies, supply chain all are taking on new meaning. Product foot-print is being redefined with the onset of wearables and IoT's. These are indeed wonderful times!

This presentation will begin with an insight to the start-up scene through the eyes of a venture partner. With a briefing on a few start-ups the author will provide insight on a few emerging technology pathways that could address needs in the manufacturing environment.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 4:15pm to 5:30pm
Venue: 
Huang 018
Tags: 

The Unexpectedly Common Traumatic Brain Injury We Continue to Ignore

Topic: 
The Unexpectedly Common Traumatic Brain Injury We Continue to Ignore
Abstract / Description: 

While the risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has recently become a health focus in athletics and militaries worldwide, data from fielding over 150,000 individually wearable sensors for monitoring hazardous events question common assumptions about the sources of those risks. This talk will review the development and fielding of a sensor system to record TBI events. Findings from two years of use by high-risk military and first responder groups will be discussed. A representative set of the over 5,000 recorded events will be reviewed, along with detailed event recreations. This will include data from the first recorded improvised explosive device (IED) attack and from training operations of civilian first responders. While the expected inertial and blast exposures are observed, the majority of the hazardous exposures are found to be unreported training events. These events will be discussed, along with future research directions.

Date and Time: 
Monday, November 17, 2014 - 4:00pm to Tuesday, November 18, 2014 - 4:55pm
Venue: 
AllenX Auditorium
Tags: 

Optics & Electronics Seminar: Ultracold Molecules in Crystals of Light: A Highly Tunable System for Exploring Novel Materials and Quantum Physics

Topic: 
Ultracold Molecules in Crystals of Light: A Highly Tunable System for Exploring Novel Materials and Quantum Physics
Abstract / Description: 

Ultracold molecules at sub-microKelvin temperatures and trapped in crystals of light (optical lattices) present a new regime of physical chemistry and a new state of matter: complex dipolar matter. We present models for the quantum many-body statics and dynamics of present experiments on polar bi-alkali dimer molecules. We are developing and will discuss Hamiltonians and simulations for upcoming experiments on dimers beyond the alkali metals, including biologically and chemically important naturally occurring free radicals like the hydroxyl free radical (OH), as well as symmetric top polyatomic molecules like methyl fluoride (CH3F). These systems offer surprising opportunities in modeling and design of new materials, in addition to well-known exciting possibilities in quantum computing applications. For example, symmetric top polyatomics can be used to study quantum molecular magnets and quantum liquid crystals. Our numerical method of choice is massively parallel high performance computing via variational matrix-product-state (MPS) algorithms, a highly successful form of data compression used to treat lowly entangled dynamics and statics of many-body systems with large Hilbert spaces; we supplement our calculations with exact diagonalization and simpler variational, perturbative, and other approaches. We use MPS algorithms not only to produce experimentally measurable quantum phase diagrams but also to explore the dynamical interplay between internal and external degrees of freedom inherent in complex dipolar matter. Our group maintains open source code (openTEBD and openMPS) available freely and used widely. We have worked and will continue to work closely with experimentalists throughout our projects, and make detailed use of ultracold molecular properties and constants to provide concrete and accurate explanations, guidance, and inspiration.

[1] Kenji Maeda, M. L. Wall, and L. D. Carr, ''Hyperfine structure of OH molecule in electric and magnetic fields,'' New J. Phys., under review, arXiv:1410.3849 (2014)
[2] M. L. Wall, Kenji Maeda, and L. D. Carr, ''Realizing unconventional quantum magnetism with symmetric top molecules,'' New J. Phys., under review, arXiv:1410.4226 (2014)
[3] M. L. Wall, Kenji Maeda, and L. D. Carr, ''Simulating quantum magnets with symmetric top molecules,'' Ann. Phys. (Berlin) 525, 845 (2013)
[4] M. L. Wall, E. Bekaroglu and L. D. Carr, ''The Molecular Hubbard Hamiltonian: Field Regimes and Molecular Species,'' Phys. Rev. A, 88, 023605 (2013)
[5] M. L. Wall and L. D. Carr, ''Out of equilibrium dynamics with Matrix Product States,'' New J. Phys. 14, 125015 (2012)
[6] L. D. Carr, David DeMille, Roman V. Krems, and Jun Ye, ''Cold and Ultracold Molecules: Science, Technology, and Applications,'' New J. Phys. 11, 055049 (2009)

Date and Time: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232
Tags: 

Optics & Electronics Seminar: Exploring Strongly Correlated Matter with Multimode Cavity QED

Topic: 
Exploring Strongly Correlated Matter with Multimode Cavity QED
Abstract / Description: 

Tentative Abstract: The last 10-15 years have seen huge advances in the use of ultra-cold atoms techniques to study strongly correlated physics. The combination of laser cooling and optical lattices has allowed experimentalists to create clean, cold, and tunable artificial crystals of atoms and light. These systems provide an excellent platform in which to study fundamental underpinnings of materials physics involving degenerate Bose and Fermi gasses in rigid periodic potentials. I will discuss current experimental work in Lev Lab studying a multimode cavity QED system that gives rise to a novel kind of dynamical optical lattice which will generate a smecticly ordered superfluid state of 87Rb. Finally, I will discuss future work to generate glassy ordered states.

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232
Tags: 

Optics & Electronics Seminar: Magnetic Excitations in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates

Topic: 
Magnetic Excitations in Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensates
Abstract / Description: 

The quantum degenerate spinor Bose gas is a new material characterized by both magnetic and superfluid order. Like other ordered magnetic materials, the gas supports magnon excitations, which are the Nambu-Goldstone bosons associated with the spontaneous breaking of rotational symmetry. We have developed techniques to create and image magnon excitations in ferromagnetic rubidium spinor condensates. At short times after their creation, magnons are observed to propagate coherently, allowing us to measure their energy dispersion with high precision through interferometry. Using high-resolution spin-sensitive imaging, we measure the magnon spectrum to be gapped due to magnetic dipole interactions (as it often is in magnetic solids). At longer times, the magnons thermalize. We show that this thermalization allows one to measure the temperature of highly degenerate gases, and to reduce this temperature further by a new form of evaporative cooling.

Date and Time: 
Monday, December 1, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232
Tags: 

Optics & Electronics Seminar: Direct Laser Cooling and Trapping of Diatomic Molecules

Topic: 
Direct Laser Cooling and Trapping of Diatomic Molecules
Abstract / Description: 

It was long considered a practical impossibility to extend the methods of laser cooling and trapping to diatomic molecules. Here, unlike in atoms, photon absorption can excite internal degrees of freedom (vibration and rotation), which both interrupts the optical cycling needed for motional cooling and leads to internal-state heating. We have recently demonstrated that, nevertheless, methods like those of standard atomic laser cooling and trapping can be applied to some molecules. We have achieved sub-Doppler cooling in 1-D, radiation pressure slowing and stopping of a molecular beam, and 3-D magneto-optical trapping of SrF molecules. This promises to open a wide range of scientific applications from precision measurements, to quantum information and quantum simulation, to precise control over chemical reactions.

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232
Tags: 

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