EE Student Information

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EE Student Information, Spring Quarter through Academic Year 2020-2021: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

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Conference

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Stanford Data Science / Infoseminar: Applying theory to practice (and practice to theory)

Topic: 
Applying theory to practice (and practice to theory)
Abstract / Description: 

The speaker will talk about applying theory to practice, with a focus on two IBM case studies. In the first case study, the practitioner initiated the interaction. This interaction led to the following problem. Assume that there is a set of "voters" and a set of "candidates", where each voter assigns a numerical score to each candidate. There is a scoring function (such as the mean or the median), and a consensus ranking is obtained by applying the scoring function to each candidate's scores. The problem is to find the top k candidates, while minimizing the number of database accesses. The speaker will present an algorithm that is optimal in an extremely strong sense: not just in the worst case or the average case, but in every case! Even though the algorithm is only 10 lines long (!), the paper containing the algorithm won the 2014 Gödel Prize, the top prize for a paper in theoretical computer science.

The interaction in the second case study was initiated by theoreticians, who wanted to lay the foundations for "data exchange", in which data is converted from one format to another. Although this problem may sound mundane, the issues that arise are fascinating, and this work made data exchange a new subfield, with special sessions in every major database conference.

This talk will be completely self-contained, and the speaker will derive morals from the case studies. The talk is aimed at both theoreticians and practitioners, to show them the mutual benefits of working together.


Stanford Data Science / Infoseminar is a weekly event held at Stanford that brings together people interested in big data, analytics, databases, and other interesting computer science topics.

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 23, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Huang Engineering Center, Nvidia Auditorium
Tags: 

Stanford Data Science / Infoseminar: Reverse-Engineering Censorship in China

Topic: 
Reverse-Engineering Censorship in China
Abstract / Description: 

Chinese government censorship of social media constitutes the largest selective suppression of human communication in recorded history. In three ways, we show, paradoxically, that this large system also leaves large footprints that reveal a great deal about itself and the intentions of the government. First is an observational study where we download all social media posts before the Chinese government can read and censor those they deem objectionable, and then detect from a network of computers all over the world which are censored. Second, we conduct a large scale randomized experiment by creating accounts on numerous social media sites spread throughout the country, submitting different randomly assigned types of social media texts, and then detecting which types are censored. And finally, we supplement the current approach of conducting uncertain (and potentially unsafe) confidential interviews with insiders via participant observation by setting up our own social media site in China, contracting with Chinese firms to install the same censoring technologies as existing sites, and -- with direct access to their software, documentation, and even customer service help desk support -- reverse engineering how it all works. Our results demonstrate, contrary to prior understandings, that criticism of the state, its leaders, and their policies are routinely published whereas posts with collective action potential are much more likely to be censored (regardless of whether they are for or against the state). We are also able to clarify the internal mechanisms of the Chinese censorship apparatus, and show how changes in censorship behavior reveal government intent by presaging their action on the ground. This talk is based on two papers, joint with with Jennifer Pan and Margaret Roberts, available at http://j.mp/ChinaExp and http://j.mp/ChinaObs.


Stanford Data Science / Infoseminar is a weekly event held at Stanford that brings together people interested in big data, analytics, databases, and other interesting computer science topics.

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 16, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Huang Engineering Center, Nvidia Auditorium
Tags: 

Stanford Data Science / Infoseminar: From bytes to bites: How data science might help feed the world

Topic: 
From bytes to bites: How data science might help feed the world
Abstract / Description: 

There is a lot of hype now about using big data in agriculture. This talk will present some background on the big current questions in the topics of agriculture and food security, briefly outline a vision for how data science can contribute to improving both agriculture and food security, detail some current work in our center towards this vision, and highlight some of the remaining technical obstacles.


Stanford Data Science / Infoseminar is a weekly event held at Stanford that brings together people interested in big data, analytics, databases, and other interesting computer science topics.

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 9, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Huang Engineering Center, Nvidia Auditorium
Tags: 

EE380 Computer Systems Colloquium: From Nanodevices to Nanosystems: The Carbon Nanotube Case Study

Topic: 
From Nanodevices to Nanosystems: The Carbon Nanotube Case Study
Abstract / Description: 

Emerging nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have great potential to revolutionize future electronic systems. For instance, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) are projected to improve the energy efficiency of digital systems by an order of magnitude compared to silicon CMOS. Unfortunately, CNTs face major obstacles such as substantial imperfections and variations inherent to CNTs, and low CNFET current densities. These obstacles limited CNFET demonstrations to stand-alone transistors or logic gates, with severely limited performance, yield, and scalability. In this talk, I will describe how to overcome these challenges through a combination of new CNT processing and CNFET circuit design solutions. This new approach transforms CNTs from solely a scientifically-interesting material to working nanosystems such as the first microprocessor [Nature 2013] and the first digital sub- systems [ISSCC 2013, JSSC 2014, ACS Nano 2014] built entirely using CNFETs. These are the first system-level demonstrations among promising emerging nanotechnologies for high- performance and highly energy-efficient digital systems. I will also demonstrate the highest current-drive CNFETs to-date, which are, for the first time, competitive with comparably-sized silicon-based transistors available from commercial foundries [IEDM 2014].

I will also discuss how CNTs are naturally suited for enabling new system architectures, such as monolithically-integrated three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits. Monolithic 3D integration allows for computation immersed in memory by creating massive connectivity between vertically-interleaved layers of logic and memory. Such architectures are key to achieving high degrees of energy efficiency for emerging abundant-data applications. I will demonstrate the first monolithically-integrated 3D nanosystems combining arbitrary vertical- interleaving layers of emerging memories (Resistive RAM) and CNFET-based digital logic, fabricated directly over a silicon CMOS substrate [VLSI Tech. 2014, IEDM 2014].

Date and Time: 
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Gates B3
Tags: 

IT-Forum: Statistical Language Modeling in the Era of Abundant Data

Topic: 
Statistical Language Modeling in the Era of Abundant Data
Abstract / Description: 

The talk presents an overview of statistical language modeling as applied to real-word problems: speech recognition, machine translation, spelling correction, soft keyboards to name a few prominent ones. We summarize the most successful estimation techniques, and examine how they fare for applications with abundant data, e.g. voice search. We conclude by highlighting a few open problems: getting an accurate estimate for the entropy of text produced by a very specific source, e.g. query stream); optimally leveraging data that is of different degrees of relevance to a given "domain"; does a bound on the size of a "good" model for a given source exist?

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 9, 2015 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Venue: 
Packard 202
Tags: 

Secure Internet of Things Research Program: Analytics on Sensor Data

Topic: 
Analytics on Sensor Data
Abstract / Description: 

The Secure Internet of Things Research Program has a weekly research seminar in the winter quarter of 2015. The seminar meets 11AM-Noon on Mondays in Gates 415 and is open to the public. We encourage students who are looking for research topics and ideas to attend. Refreshments (coffee, bagels, etc.) are served.

iot.stanford.edu/seminar/15w.html

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 9, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 415
Tags: 

Secure Internet of Things Research Program: fabryq: Using Phones as Gateways to Program Smart Devices from the Web

Topic: 
Using Phones as Gateways to Program Smart Devices from the Web
Abstract / Description: 

The Secure Internet of Things Research Program has a weekly research seminar in the winter quarter of 2015. The seminar meets 11AM-Noon on Mondays in Gates 415 and is open to the public. We encourage students who are looking for research topics and ideas to attend. Refreshments (coffee, bagels, etc.) are served.

iot.stanford.edu/seminar/15w.html

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 2, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 415
Tags: 

Secure Internet of Things Research Program: Affiliate Talk

Topic: 
Affiliate Talk
Abstract / Description: 

The Secure Internet of Things Research Program has a weekly research seminar in the winter quarter of 2015. The seminar meets 11AM-Noon on Mondays in Gates 415 and is open to the public. We encourage students who are looking for research topics and ideas to attend. Refreshments (coffee, bagels, etc.) are served.

iot.stanford.edu/seminar/15w.html

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 23, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 415
Tags: 

Secure Internet of Things Research Program: Beetle: Many-to-Many Bluetooth Communication

Topic: 
Beetle: Many-to-Many Bluetooth Communication
Abstract / Description: 

The Secure Internet of Things Research Program has a weekly research seminar in the winter quarter of 2015. The seminar meets 11AM-Noon on Mondays in Gates 415 and is open to the public. We encourage students who are looking for research topics and ideas to attend. Refreshments (coffee, bagels, etc.) are served.

iot.stanford.edu/seminar/15w.html

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 9, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Venue: 
Gates 415
Tags: 

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