Applied Physics / Physics Colloquium

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Black Holes, Holography, and Entanglement

Topic: 
Black Holes, Holography, and Entanglement
Abstract / Description: 

Black holes have been instrumental in paving the way toward a quantum theory of gravity. Their elegant mathematical formulation has revealed that black holes behave as thermodynamic objects, which subsequently motivated the holographic principle. Its concrete realization, the gauge/gravity duality, offers a framework for elucidating the fundamental nature of spacetime, once we understand the map between the two sides of the duality sufficiently well. Research over the last decade has offered tantalizing hints that quantum entanglement plays a foundational role, ushering in more mysteries. This talk will give a broad-brush perspective on these themes and motivate considering a time-dependent context in order to gain further insight.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

The Shoucheng Zhang Memorial Workshop

Topic: 
The Shoucheng Zhang Memorial Workshop
Abstract / Description: 

Our friend, Professor Shoucheng Zhang, passed away on December 1, 2018. This was a great loss for the entire physics community.

To honor Shoucheng and to celebrate his remarkable science and life, a Memorial Workshop from May 2-4, 2019 is being held.

Shoucheng has influenced many of us deeply with his great enthusiasm and unique talent for discovering the beauty and simplicity in physics. We feel that the best way to remember him is to dedicate to him a lively workshop with exciting lectures and a lot of fruitful discussion.

Date and Time: 
Thursday, May 2, 2019 - 8:30am to Saturday, May 4, 2019 - 5:00pm
Venue: 
Bechtel Conference Center, Encina Hall

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Quantum Diamond Sensors

Topic: 
Quantum Diamond Sensors
Abstract / Description: 

In recent years, optically probed nitrogen–vacancy (NV) quantum defects in diamond have become a leading modality for magnetic, electrical, and temperature sensing at short length scales (nanometers to millimeters) under ambient conditions. This technology has wide-ranging application across the physical and life sciences — from NMR spectroscopy at the scale of individual cells to improved biomedical diagnostics to the search for dark matter. I will provide an overview of quantum diamond sensors and their diverse applications.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Critical Fabulations: Reworking the Methods and Margins of Design

Topic: 
Critical Fabulations: Reworking the Methods and Margins of Design
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)


Speaker Daniela Rosner
Assistant Professor, Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering, University of Washington
Critical Fabulations: Reworking the Methods and Margins of Design

Date and Time: 
Monday, March 11, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Seeing is Believing: The Role of Materials in Painting Life

Topic: 
Seeing is Believing: The Role of Materials in Painting Life
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)


Speaker Barbara Berrie
Head of Scientific Research Department, National Gallery of Art
Seeing is Believing: The Role of Materials in Painting Life

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 25, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Precision Chemical Sensing: Using techniques from Quantum Optics to reach part-per-trillion sensitivity in the field

Topic: 
Precision Chemical Sensing: Using techniques from Quantum Optics to reach part-per-trillion sensitivity in the field
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)


Speaker Tony Miller
CEO, Entanglement Technologies
Precision Chemical Sensing: Using techniques from Quantum Optics to reach part-per-trillion sensitivity in the field

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 11, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

AP483 Optics & Electronics Seminar presents Internal models and the neural control of prey interception

Topic: 
Internal models and the neural control of prey interception
Abstract / Description: 

AP 483 & AMO Seminar Series
Time:
4:15 pm, every Monday (Refreshments begin at 4 pm)


Speaker Matthew Norcia
NRC Postdoctoral Fellow, JILA, University of Colorado at Boulder
Superradiance, enhanced cooling, and microscopic control with narrow-li

 

Date and Time: 
Monday, February 4, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Microbial Ecology as a New Frontier for Theoretical Physics

Topic: 
Microbial Ecology as a New Frontier for Theoretical Physics
Abstract / Description: 

Life on Earth is predominantly microbial; complex microbial ecosystems run our planet and shape our health. Thanks to a recent technological revolution, we are discovering that our macroscopic intuition about evolution and ecology is faltering at the microbial scale, making us question some of the most basic concepts, such as "species," "fitness," and even "organism." But how else could we describe these systems, if not in these terms? I will argue that this exciting challenge is one where the methods of theoretical physics have the most to contribute. I will then discuss one way to make this intriguing question precise, investigating simple mathematical models whose large-N regime can be seen as describing both ecological and evolutionary phenomena. This approach blurs the boundary between a simple ecosystem and a complex organism, and may pave the road towards non-discrete generalizations of the familiar discrete notions.


 

Wtr. Qtr. Colloq. committee: A. Linde (Chair), S. Kivelson, B. Lev, S. Zhang
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 201

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 12, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Pixels to Physics: The Promise and Challenges of Survey Cosmology

Topic: 
Pixels to Physics: The Promise and Challenges of Survey Cosmology
Abstract / Description: 

We are entering a transformative period in observational cosmology. Large cosmological surveys starting in 2019 promise to solve key problems in cosmology — but only if we develop new approaches for handling the volume and complexity of the data. Extracting robust cosmological information from these surveys is a major challenge that will require development and validation of analysis methods at each step of the chain from raw pixels to cosmology. I will comment on some of the experimental and methodological innovations that are needed to realize the promise of upcoming surveys.


 

Wtr. Qtr. Colloq. committee: A. Linde (Chair), S. Kivelson, B. Lev, S. Zhang
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 201

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents New Perspectives on the Riemann Hypothesis

Topic: 
New Perspectives on the Riemann Hypothesis
Abstract / Description: 

The Riemann Hypothesis is widely considered as the greatest unsolved problem in pure mathematics, conjectured nearly over 160 years ago. Its importance is for the many far-reaching implications for the distribution of prime numbers. In this colloquium, I will first review these well-known facts and history, with some emphasis on the appearance of Riemann's zeta function in physics, in particular in quantum statistical mechanics. I will then outline some recent work that offers a clear strategy towards proving the Riemann Hypothesis. One such strategy is based on an analogy with random walks and stochastic time series. As a concrete application of these ideas, I will explain how I calculated the google-th Riemann zero.

This lecture is dedicated to Shoucheng Zhang. In discussions with him in the last year I learned that he had a deep interest and knowledge of this problem, and some interesting ideas about it.


 

Wtr. Qtr. Colloq. committee: A. Linde (Chair), S. Kivelson, B. Lev, S. Zhang
Location: Hewlett Teaching Center, Rm. 201

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

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