Applied Physics / Physics Colloquium

#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces

Topic: 
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces
Abstract / Description: 

Individuals of all genders invited to be a part of:
#StanfordToo: A Conversation about Sexual Harassment in Our Academic Spaces, where we will feature real stories of harassment at Stanford academic STEM in a conversation with Provost Drell, Dean Minor (SoM), and Dean Graham (SE3). We will have plenty of time for audience discussion on how we can take concrete action to dismantle this culture and actively work towards a more inclusive Stanford for everyone. While our emphasis is on STEM fields, we welcome and encourage participation from students, postdocs, staff, and faculty of all academic disciplines and backgrounds.

Date and Time: 
Friday, April 19, 2019 - 3:30pm
Venue: 
STLC 111

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents "Strongly Interacting Synthetic Topological Insulators in High Dimensions"

Topic: 
Strongly Interacting Synthetic Topological Insulators in High Dimensions
Abstract / Description: 

details TBA

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, May 21, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Imaging at the genomic-scale: from 3D organization of the genome to cell atlas of the brain

Topic: 
Imaging at the genomic-scale: from 3D organization of the genome to cell atlas of the brain
Abstract / Description: 

details TBA

 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Matter made of Light: Mott Insulators and Topological Fields

Topic: 
Matter made of Light: Mott Insulators and Topological Fields
Abstract / Description: 

In this talk I will describe our ongoing effort at the University of Chicago to explore exotic models of condensed matter using materials made of light. Starting with a quick discussion of "light as matter," I will then explain how we imbue photons with the essential attributes of a material particle: mass, charge, and interactions. Along the way, I will introduce the two "flavors" of photons that we employ for our photonic matter: optical photons trapped in Fabry-Perot cavities, and microwave photons trapped in superconducting resonators or transmon qubits. Finally, I will describe the first two materials that have emerged from our interacting photons: a Mott insulator of microwave photons and a topological fluid of optical photons. More broadly, building materials from light impacts both (a) the kinds of matter that can be assembled, and (b) the assembly process itself, providing a new window on the physics of correlated quantum matter.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 23, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Computational Microscopy for phase retrieval, super-resolution and 3D imaging

Topic: 
Computational Microscopy for phase retrieval, super-resolution and 3D imaging
Abstract / Description: 

Computational imaging involves the joint design of imaging system hardware and software, optimizing across the entire pipeline from acquisition to reconstruction. Computers can replace bulky and expensive optics by solving computational inverse problems. This talk will describe new microscopes that use computational imaging to enable 3D, super-resolution and phase imaging with simple and inexpensive hardware. Our reconstruction algorithms are based on large-scale nonlinear non-convex optimization. Applications span optical bioimaging, X-ray lithography and atomic-resolution electron microscopy.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 16, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium presents Black Holes, Holography, and Entanglement

Topic: 
Black Holes, Holography, and Entanglement
Abstract / Description: 

Black holes have been instrumental in paving the way toward a quantum theory of gravity. Their elegant mathematical formulation has revealed that black holes behave as thermodynamic objects, which subsequently motivated the holographic principle. Its concrete realization, the gauge/gravity duality, offers a framework for elucidating the fundamental nature of spacetime, once we understand the map between the two sides of the duality sufficiently well. Research over the last decade has offered tantalizing hints that quantum entanglement plays a foundational role, ushering in more mysteries. This talk will give a broad-brush perspective on these themes and motivate considering a time-dependent context in order to gain further insight.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, April 9, 2019 - 4:30pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 201

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