William C. Reynolds Memorial Seminar

Topic: 
Where Imperfections Lead to Opportunity: Defect-Based Devices in Diamond and SiC
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 5:00pm to 6:00pm
Venue: 
Huang 300
Speaker: 
Dr. Evelyn Hu (Harvard)
Abstract / Description: 

If "form defines function", our usual assumption may be that a "perfect form" is needed to provide "perfect functions" for a device, whether the function involves precision sensing, or the storing or transmission of information. However, a great deal of recent excitement has centered on defects in diamond. The "nitrogen-vacancy" pairs a carbon vacancy in the crystal with a substitutional nitrogen atom. This defect can display outstanding spin coherence, uniquely coupled to a distinctive photon signature, providing exceptional opportunities for preparing, reading out and transmitting spin states by optical means. And yet the diamond NVs appear to be only one of a wealth of still to be discovered spin-photon-active defects that could span a wide swathe of photon energies and applications. This talk will focus on the formation of sensitive optical amplifiers (nanocavities) for these defects, in both diamond and SiC, detailing the challenges and delicacy of the fabrication processes to preserve the defects and enhance their signatures.

Reception prior to the seminar 4:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Bio:

Dr. Evelyn Hu is the Tarr-Coyne Professor of Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard. Prior to Harvard, she was a faculty member at UCSB, in the Departments of Materials, and of Electrical and Computer Engineering. While at UCSB, she also served as the founding Scientific co-Director of the California NanoSystems Institute, a joint initiative between UCSB and UCLA. Before joining UCSB, she worked at Bell Labs in both Holmdel and Murray Hill. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Academica Sinica of Taiwan. She is a recipient of an NSF Distinguished Teaching Fellow award, an AAAS Lifetime Mentor Award, and holds honorary Doctorates from the University of Glasgow, Heriot-Watt University, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and the University of Notre Dame.