EE Student Information

EE Student Information, Spring Quarter 19-20: FAQs and Updated EE Course List.

Updates will be posted on this page, as well as emailed to the EE student mail list.

Please see Stanford University Health Alerts for course and travel updates.

As always, use your best judgement and consider your own and others' well-being at all times.

Q-FARM presents "Atom arrays of ultracold strontium: new tools for metrology and many-body physics"

Topic: 
Atom arrays of ultracold strontium: new tools for metrology and many-body physics
Wednesday, April 1, 2020 - 12:00pm
Venue: 
Zoom link: stanford.zoom.us/j/987676025
Speaker: 
Adam Kaufman (CU Boulder)
Abstract / Description: 

The development of microscopic detection of ensembles of neutral atoms has transformed our ability to study complex many-body systems. Techniques like quantum gas microscopy and optical tweezer arrays grant a unique single-particle-resolved perspective on solid-state analogs and idealized quantum spin models, as well as novel detection capabilities for quantities like entanglement. In this talk, I will describe our progress towards developing these tools for a new atomic species, strontium. In doing so, we establish new prospects enabled by the rich internal degrees-of-freedom associated with alkaline-earth atoms. I will report on our recent results in which we apply our platform to optical atomic clocks, a new application of optical tweezer arrays which indicates a number of strengths for metrology. In particular, I will describe our strategies for reaching arrays with hundreds of tweezers with sub-Hz atom-optical coherence, 41 seconds of atomic coherence, and atomic stability on par with the state-of-the-art. I will then describe our parallel progress towards engineering entanglement on an optical clock transition, as well as new scaling strategies involving atom-by-atom assembly in optical lattice potentials.

Bio:

Adam Kaufman is an Associate JILA fellow at CU Boulder. He has worked on optical tweezer trapping of neutral atoms and quantum gas microscopy, for studies in few-to-many body physics with ultracold atoms.