OSA/SPIE Seminar: Computational Optics for Multidimensional Nanoscale Imaging of Single Fluorescent Molecules

Topic: 
Computational Optics for Multidimensional Nanoscale Imaging of Single Fluorescent Molecules
Thursday, June 7, 2018 - 4:15pm
Venue: 
Spilker 232
Speaker: 
Matthew D. Lew (Washington University)
Abstract / Description: 

Visualizing the dynamic movements and interactions between biomolecules remains a challenge, motivating the development of new optical technology and computational algorithms for imaging at the nanoscale. We have built two technologies for multidimensional imaging of single molecules (SMs): the Tri-spot point spread function (PSF) and the Robust Statistical Estimation (RoSE) algorithm. The Tri-spot PSF measures each second moment of SM orientation with near-uniform sensitivity, thereby capturing the orientation and rotational diffusion of SMs using just one camera frame. For 3D imaging, we developed RoSE to minimize the vectorial localization errors in super-resolution microscopy that result from both the structure of the sample and the PSF itself. By estimating the likelihood of a blinking event to be present in each imaging frame, RoSE localizes molecules accurately and minimizes false localizations even when images overlap.

Bio:

Professor Lew joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis in 2015, after completing his PhD in Electrical Engineering in the Moerner Lab and a postdoctoral appointment in the de la Zerda group at Stanford. Professor Lew is a recipient of a 2017 NSF CAREER Award for his project entitled "CAREER: Nanoscale sensing and imaging using computational single-molecule nanoscopy." In 2016, Professor Lew was given the Hiruma/Wagner Award at the 16th Conference of Peace through Mind/Brain Science. He has also received a Second Place Poster Award at the Gordon Research Conference "Single-Molecule Approaches to Biology" and a PicoQuant Young Investigator Award at SPIE Photonics West. Professor Lew is a member the Optical Society, SPIE, the American Chemical Society, Tau Beta Pi, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was co-president of the Stanford Optical Society in 2013-14 and chair of the Stanford University Photonics Retreat in 2013.