Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium: From Stimulation to Perception: Adaptive Optics for Testing Human Vision on a Cellular Scale

Topic: 
From Stimulation to Perception: Adaptive Optics for Testing Human Vision on a Cellular Scale
Tuesday, March 3, 2015 - 4:15pm to 5:15pm
Venue: 
Hewlett 200
Speaker: 
Austin Roorda (UC Berkeley)
Abstract / Description: 

Learning how sensory signals are transformed into perception is a challenge. In vitro preparations offer access to single cells as well as to an ever-expanding arsenal of tools to measure physiology, but come at the cost of perception. Living animals impose limitations on access (controlling the retinal stimulation, for example) and can only offer primitive measures of perception. By combining adaptive-optics micro-optical-stimulation with high-speed eye tracking in humans, we believe we can offer the best of both worlds. Adaptive optics and high-speed eye tracking allow us to control light stimulation down to the single receptor level and, since it is done in humans, we can use that in concert with sophisticated psychophysical tasks. This talk will describe the evolution of the technology that we've developed in our lab followed by an update on our ongoing efforts to learn about the neural circuits that underlie human spatial and color vision.


 

Held Tuesdays at 4:15 pm, in the William R. Hewlett Teaching Center, room 200 (see map). Refreshments in the lobby of Varian Physics at 4:00 pm.

Autumn 2014/15, Committee: A. Linde (Chair), L. Hollberg, B. Macintosh & Young Lee