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ACM Learning Webinar presents Prof. Andrea Goldsmith - webinar

Image of Professor Andrea Goldsmith
Topic: 
The Future of Wireless and What It Will Enable
Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 9:00am
Venue: 
webinar
Speaker: 
Professor Andrea Goldsmith (Stanford)
Abstract / Description: 

Wireless technology has enormous potential to change the way we live, work, and play over the next several decades. Future wireless networks will support 100 Gbps communication between people, devices, and the "Internet of Things," with high reliability and uniform coverage indoors and out. The shortage of spectrum to support such systems will be alleviated by advances in massive MIMO and mmW technology as well as cognitive radios. Wireless technology will also enable smart and energy-efficient homes and buildings, automated highways and skyways, and in-body networks for monitoring, analysis, and treatment of medical conditions. Breakthrough energy-efficiency architectures, algorithms, and hardware will allow wireless networks to be powered by tiny batteries, energy-harvesting, or over-the-air power transfer. Finally, new communication systems based on biology and chemistry to encode bits will enable a wide range of new micro and macroscale applications. There are many technical challenges that must be overcome in order to make this vision a reality. This talk will describe what the wireless future might look like along with some of the innovations and breakthroughs required to realize this vision.

Bios:

Andrea Goldsmith is the Stephen Harris professor in the School of Engineering and a professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She co-founded and served as Chief Technical Officer of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna (QTNA), and she currently serves on the Corporate or Technical Advisory Boards of multiple public and private companies. She has also held industry positions at Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford, and has received several awards for her work, including the ACM Athena Lecturer Award, the IEEE Comsoc Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award, the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecture Award, the Women in Communications Engineering Mentoring Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal's Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book Wireless Communications and co-author of the books MIMO Wireless Communications and Principles of Cognitive Radio, all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents. She has also launched and led several multi-university research projects. Her research interests are in information theory and communication theory, and their application to wireless communications and related fields. She received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley.

At Stanford she has served as Chair of Stanford's Faculty Senate and on its Advisory Board, Budget Group, Committee on Research, Planning and Policy Board, Commissions on Graduate and on Undergraduate Education, Faculty Women's Forum Steering Committee, and Task Force on Women and Leadership.


Moderator, Marco Gruteser is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering as well as Computer Science (by courtesy) at Rutgers University's Wireless Information Network Laboratory (WINLAB). He directs research in mobile computing, is a pioneer in the area of location privacy, and recognized for his work on connected vehicles. Beyond these topics, Marco's more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and patents span a wide range of wireless, mobile systems, and pervasive computing issues. He has served as program co-chair or vice-chair for conferences such as ACM MobiSys, ACM WiSec, IEEE VNC, and IEEE Percom. He has delivered nine conference and workshop keynotes, served as panel moderator at ACM MobiCom, and as panelist at ACM MobiSys, IEEE Infocom, and IEEE ICC. In the past, Marco has held research and visiting positions at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center and Carnegie Mellon University. His recognitions include an NSF CAREER award, a Rutgers Board of Trustees Research Fellowship for Scholarly Excellence, a Rutgers Outstanding Engineering Faculty Award, as well as best paper awards at ACM MobiCom 2012, ACM MobiCom 2011, and ACM MobiSys 2010. His work has been regularly featured in the media, including NPR, the New York Times, Fox News TV, and CNN TV. Marco is an ACM Distinguished Scientist and currently serves as Chair of ACM SIGMOBILE.